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Today's News

  • NRA suit vs. Florida continues

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    A Palatka goat farmer's request to intervene in the lawsuit filed March 9 by the NRA against Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi was denied.

    The National Rifle Association filed suit against Bondi in response to legislation signed into law by Gov. Rick Scott. The new law was in response to the shooting Feb. 14 at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. The new statute increases the age limit of individuals allowed to buy rifles and shotguns from age 18 to 21.

    Mitchell Williams, 26, a goat farmer attempted to intervene in the lawsuit, but the judge ruled he had no standing in the case. Williams stated in a letter to the federal court that Florida had been experiencing issues with neighbors shooting to close to his home and goats. He suggested the courts limit the purchase of ammunition and also include microchips on ammo to make it traceable.

  • Panhandling could be costly in Chiefland

    By C.L. Watson, Citizen Correspondent

    Panhandling within the city limits of Chiefland could end up costing the panhandler money.

    Ordinance 18-02 to prohibit aggressive solicitation was introduced at the March 26 meeting with the first reading winning a unanimous vote by city commissioners. The ordinance is not limited to persons scouring parking lots asking for a financial handout. The ordinance further defines aggressive solicitation as approaching or speaking to a person and solicit, or attempt to solicit, in such manner the person feels an imminent threat. Peddlers of merchandise, offers of employment and donations for charitable groups could be in violation of the proposed ordinance if the panhandler acts aggressively. The ordinance carries a maximum fine of $500 and or imprisonment for violators. The ordinance must pass a second reading April 9 before it is enforceable.

  • Christians celebrate the resurrection

    Christians in Cedar Key celebrated Easter Sunday enjoying God’s creation on the beach on a beautiful morning knowing their lord has risen.

    “Where else would you want to be,” Rev. Susie Horner, pastor of Cedar Key United Methodist Church asked. The imagery water represents in the Bible is vital to the message in the Bible. “Water is renewed life. We’re baptized in water. We are given new life through our baptism in water. It’s a continuous part of our faith walk. Water is just life giving.”

    The never ceasing wave action of the Gulf waters lapping at the shore is a reminder of that continuum of life.

    “We’re baptized in water. You go down unclean and you rise clean and from that moment, you have the promise of eternal life,” she said.

    All four of the churches in Cedar Key participated in the sunrise service: Church of Christ, Christ Episcopal Church, Cedar Key Baptist Church and the Methodist Church.

  • 2018 legislative session: some wins, some losses for the environment

    By Save the Manatee Club

    As in years past, the Florida Legislature considered but failed to pass a ban on hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”).

    The bipartisan Senate bill, SB 462, had unanimous support in the Senate Committee on Environmental Preservation and Conservation and the Appropriations Subcommittee on the Environment and Natural Resources before stalling in its final committee. The House version of the bill was never scheduled for hearing.

    Fracking is of particular concern in Florida because of the state’s karst geology and the enhanced risk that contaminants from the extraction process could migrate into ground and surface water, threatening both natural ecosystems and public drinking water supplies.

    Two bills that did pass pose potentially significant risks to Florida’s springs and wetlands.

    The first, HB 7043, authorizes DEP to assume responsibility for the federal Clean Water Act “dredge and fill” permitting program. On its face, this proposal sounds sensible, with the laudable goal of reducing duplicative application requirements.

  • Easter morning in Cedar Key feels serene

    Serenity surrounds me.

    It is Easter Sunday in Cedar Key.

    I gaze across the Gulf.

    It is pre-dawn.

    It is those minutes between the dark of night and sunrise.

    The moments are precious.

    Fleeting.

    Like life itself — finite.

    The soul enters the body.

    The soul leaves the body.

    Everything beyond — eternal.

    The sun rises in the East

    On Easter morning in Cedar Key.

    I gaze across the Gulf.

    My eyes look on.

    There is nothing to see except in my mind’s own eye.

    A small fishing vessel.

    Like life itself.

    The boat leaves shore.

    The boat returns.

    Everything beyond — eternal.

    The Bible is filled with references to water beginning with Gen. 1:2 (KJV), “And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.”

  • CMHS track standouts compete at prestigious Florida Relays

    The athletes of the Chiefland track and field team that competed at the 2018 Pepsi Florida Relays in Gainesville over spring break faced an uphill challenge, as they ran and hurdled against some of the top competition from around the state.

    But the Indians’ appearance – and effort – was impressive in itself, as they boasted what was likely the youngest group of runners at the University of Florida-hosted three-day meet from March 29 to March 31. And the experience was invaluable for Coach Lee Bell’s teams, as they turned in performances on a state-of-the-art track against fields of competitors that rivaled those at the state championships. The runners had to deal with long breaks between events, up to five or six hours in some cases, and rainy conditions on Friday.

  • CMHS quintet snatch wins in Monticello

    Five different Chiefland athletes combined for eight individual wins while the Indians collected an additional 18 top-3 finishes at the Jefferson County Tri Meet March 22 in Monticello.

    Reagan Hudson led the charge for CMHS with three first-place finishes – Girls 100 Hurdles (20.57 seconds); Girls 300 Hurdles (1:00.75) and Girls Discus Throw (75 feet, 9 inches) – and a second place (Girls High Jump, 4-04.0).

    Lady Indians junior Courtney Hayes prevailed in the Girls High Jump at 4-08.0.

    Sophomore Luke Stockman led the Indian boys with a first-place finish in the Boys 1600 meter run (5 minutes, 24.61 seconds) and the 3200 (2 mile) at 12:03.16. Senior Tramaine Brown collected first in the Boys Long Jump (17-02.0) for CMHS.

    For the Lady Indians, eighth-grader Lauren Jones took first in the Girls 1600 (5:48.43) and won unopposed in the 3200 (12:29.08).

    Senior Quay Brodus nearly added another win for Chiefland, as he tied for first in the Boys High Jump at 36-04.0, but was marked at second on the tiebreaker. Brodus added a No. 3 finished in the shot put (17-03.5).

  • CMHS track to honor past coaches

    Chiefland Middle High School track and field is hosting the first-ever C. Doyle McCall and Wendell Corbin Honorary Invitational Track Meet Thursday, April 5, in honor of two coaches who built the foundation of the program.

    McCall, best known as a legendary football coach for the Indians, founded the track program in 1953, and Corbin helped take it to new heights as a longtime coach. A special presentation will be held at 3:15 p.m. before the meet to honor the two coaches. McCall is unable to attend due to health reasons, so a member of one of his first track teams, Jolyn Corbin, will accept the honor on his former coach’s behalf.

    With six schools slated to participate, including Bronson, Williston, Mayo-Lafayette and Jefferson County, the meet will be as large or larger than any meet in recent years hosted at CMHS.

    The meet will start at 3:30 p.m., beginning with the 4x800 relay, followed by the field events, and then the remaining running events.

    The CMHS Running Sports Booster Club is putting on the meet with award sponsorships from Bar-B-Q Bill’s and Chiefland Farm Supply.

  • CMHS alumni return for busy career day

    Chiefland Middle High School’s career day on March 22 wasn’t exclusive to the school’s alumni, but their impressive representation among the professionals presenting at the event made for a good example for current students.

    Around half of the 31 career representatives – from companies, government organizations and colleges – previously attended the school. Those reps, of course, detailed and demonstrated the work of their fields, but also offered general advice to the future graduates.

    Denny George, of Duke Energy, one of 10 classroom presenters, advised current students to remain open and well-rounded when it comes to their studies, as their minds are likely to change about their career paths before they’re finished with school.

  • Easter Bunny lays 40,000 eggs

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    Forward Church covered the ground at Strickland Park with 40,000 candy-filled plastic Easter eggs Sunday, March 25.

    The annual hunt included many fun things for children to do.

    First responders were present to give children a close up look inside the back of a Levy County Ambulance or inside a Chiefland fire truck. The Levy County Sheriff’s Office brought its airboat and allowed kids to pose for pictures on the boat. A state trooper was also present and Chiefland police officer Kyle Schultz and his K9 partner, Blitz, met boys and girls. Kids posed for pictures with the first responders, talked to them about safety and were given safety pamphlets.

    Children also had the opportunities to play on bouncy houses and to have their faces painted.

    Mini Angels Rescue Petting Zoo also had many animals for children to hold and pet. They had a large tortoise, a small pig, goats, guinea pigs, rabbits and more.

    Shandscaire also landed their helicopter and allowed children and parents to explore the inside of the helicopter.