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Today's News

  • Trick-or-treat is Saturday

    The Chiefland Police Department’s Halloween Haunted House returns this scary season for the two weekends before Halloween.

    The House opens Oct. 19, Oct. 20, Oct. 26 and Oct. 27, at the old CFEC Warehouse behind Hardee’s on 11th Ave., starting at 6:30 p.m. each night. Admission is $8 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Visit ChieflandPD.com or the CPD Facebook page for more information.

    On Oct. 27, at the same site as the haunted house, there will be the Chiefland Trunk-or-Treat. There will be a Halloween Costume Contest (for age groups: 0 to 3; 4 to 8; and 9 to 12), a pumpkin carving contest and a photo area. The event is at 6:30 p.m.

    The City of Chiefland’s official trick-or-treating day is Saturday, Oct. 27.

    On Thursday, Oct. 25, Chiefland Elementary School is holding its rescheduled Fall Festival from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

  • Karaoke, D.J. company looks to expand into Levy

    Alex Quintero, owner of GC entertainment, a Gainesville-based company that provides specialized D.J., karaoke and trivia services, said his company is looking to provide its entertainment services in Levy County.

    Quintero visited the Suwannee Valley Rotary Club at the Haven Community Building in Chiefland on Sept. 27.

    The business typically does about 15 trivia shows per week, according to Quintero. “All of our trivia shows are unique,” he said. “We do not do the same show twice.” They also do karaoke shows with live bands to back up the singers. “This makes them a star when they are on the stage,” Quintero said.

    Quintero touted the uniqueness of his services. “We meet with clients and ask a lot of questions to custom tailor events. We also have weekly meetings with clients to tweak what is not working,” Quintero said.

    GC Entertainment serves restaurants and bars, event venues, local businesses, live musicians and performers, event planners and private clients.

  • Fledgling Running Sports Booster Club is revitalizing track, cross country at CMHS

    It’s only been about a year and a half since the formation of the Chiefland Middle High School Runnings Sports Booster Club, which works to facilitate resources for the Indians’ track and field and cross country programs.

    Runnings sports might appear to have lo-tech needs, but that’s not actually the case.

    The booster club has big plans, and it’s reception of a $1,500 check through a grant from the Capital City Bank Foundation was a big step towards one of those ends. The funds were earmarked for a new pole vault set, which has already been ordered. The Club was figuring out the logistics of bringing it to Chiefland, from Ohio.

    Harry Hutson, a longtime coach, now technically retired, who was a principal figure behind the start of the club, can’t recall how long it’s been since the track and field program had a working pole vault set. It’s been longer than a decade, and its absence is costly to the team’s success.

    Hutson was a member of the school’s first-ever track team, coached by the legendary C. Doyle McCall.

  • Record-setting CMHS pair pick up state honors

    If you paid any attention to the Chiefland varsity softball team this past season, you know how critical to its success were the arm of Kensley Durrance and the bat of Macie Thomas.

    The work of the junior duo translated into a couple of record-breaking feats for the program, and now a spot on the Miracle Sports Class 1A First Team All-State lineup.

    Durrance, a right-handed ace, who set a single-season record with 217 strikeouts in her second season as the full-time starter, was selected to the First Team as a pitcher. The junior struck out 1.63 batters per inning and finished with a 17-5 mark in the circle, at one point winning 10 straight to open the season. She finished with a 1.26 ERA and held opposing hitters to a .163, while walking just 36 batters throughout her 133 frames.

    It’s the second year in a row Durrance was named to the First Team.

    Thomas, a slugging first baseman, who was selected as Chiefland’s top hitter and defensive player at the team banquet, was selected to the First Team as a designated player (DP), which is similar to a designated hitter in baseball.

  • Dynastic career

    Brittany Gilliam isn’t afraid of calling her shots.

    Her confident, well-earned swagger was the attitudinal underpinning of the Chiefland softball team’s historic run to its first Class 1A state championship in 2014, which kicked off three straight titles and four finals appearances.

    But she wasn’t expecting the level of success she and her North Georgia Nighthawks would enjoy in her senior year of college.

    The NCAA powerhouse went 62-4 before eventually falling in the Division II World Series.

    It didn’t look that promising in the fall, when the Nighthawks were splitting a series with a junior college team.

    “We still had some things to figure out,” said Gilliam, who is completing her degree in business marketing this summer before returning to Chiefland. “We had a young team, so we really didn’t know how the spring was going to play out.”

  • Worthy finish

    Austin Langworthy entered Florida’s Gainesville Super Regional baseball series against Auburn without a home run all season in McKethan Stadium.

    But the Gator baseball team, which broke through last season with its first national championship, has lately been all about unprecedented achievements.

    With his second home run in as many games Monday, the Williston alumnus led off the bottom of the 10th with a walk-off home run to right field to send UF to the NCAA Men’s College World Series (CWS) in Omaha, Nebraska, where it’ll seek to defend its title.

    Florida prevailed 3-2 in the closely-fought pitcher’s duel after splitting the first pair of games against the Tigers.

    Langworthy’s home run bounced off the glove of an Auburn outfielder, sending the sophomore left fielder, his club and the nearly 6,000 in attendance into ecstatic celebration.

    The thrilling hit earned the Levy County native a couple more unprecedented personal feats – his first Gatorade bath and an ESPN Sportscenter interview.

  • Renovated Blue Springs Park reopens in time for summer

    After months of renovation work, Blue Springs in Bronson is once again open for swimming and picnicking.

    Ten pavilions, numerous new concrete tables and benches and freshly painted restrooms with newly built changing rooms and a paved parking lot have all been added to enhance Blue Springs Park.

    The park, a once privately owned spring, was sold to the Board of Public Instruction of Levy County back in early 1950 for a nominal fee of one dollar. Since the 1950s, between the School Board, the town of Bronson and Levy County, Blue Springs has changed hands several times. Levy County now owns Blue Springs Park and Little Blue Springs.

    Blue Springs is a second magnitude spring, meaning water flows from the aquifer to the surface at a discharge rate of 280 to 2800 liters or 10 to 100 cubic feet of water per second. Blue Springs discharges to the southwest down a short run and into the Waccasassa River, which flows south to the Gulf of Mexico. Florida springs range from 69 to 97 degrees, and Blue Springs seems to maintain an average of 72 degrees, according to Matt Weldon, director of Levy County Parks.

  • Softball superlatives

    The Chiefland softball program held a festive and busy awards banquet May 24 at the Concord Baptist Church in south Chiefland, recognizing players from all three of its teams – middle school, junior varsity and varsity.

    Players received various gifts and recognitions, including letters and pins.

    The seniors received the shadow boxed jerseys and special commemorative softballs with their pictures.

    The players were also treated to a special guest speaker, two-time Florida Gator national champion Taylore Fuller. Fuller, a 2012 Chiefland graduate, was a two-time All-American in Chiefland and a Florida Player of the Year, and she went on to start 203 games at UF, where she finished second in the program in grand slams.

    Fuller discussed a typical offseason day to impart what level of commitment it takes to perform at the highest levels on the diamond. She recounted a schedule that included a 5:45 a.m. workout, followed by class, and then a four-hour practice.

  • Former Indian headed to Jax for college hoops

    Patrick Jackson has patiently bided his time while looking to resume his basketball career at the college level.

    The former Chiefland standout, who twice led the Indians in scoring and joined them for a trip to the state final four, was tentatively set to attend Webber International in 2017.

    It didn’t pan out, as WIU went through a coaching change, but Jackson didn’t lose hope. Meanwhile, he took courses at Santa Fe College and the College of Central Florida, with an eye toward eventually gaining a business degree, perhaps with a focus in sports management.

    He also stayed close to the game he loved, helping coach Cedar Key School middle schoolers, staying in shape, and rooting on his younger sister, Jasmin, who, as a dominant point guard for the Lady Sharks, has garnered her own share of attention from college scouts.

    Jackson was put in touch with coaches at Trinity Baptist College, out of Jacksonville, by one of its former players, Brandon Raines, a basketball coach and athletic director at Riverside Christian in Trenton. The connection yielded a tryout for Jackson, who let his game speak for itself.

  • Middle-schoolers garner top academic prizes

    Chiefland Middle Schoolers were honored for their outstanding academic achievements May 21 in the CMHS Auditorium.

    The top academic achievers in GPA per grade were eighth-grader Coburn Hardee; seventh-grader Adysen Baker and sixth-grader Oren Wilson; Wilson also picked up top reader honors in the Accelerated Reader Awards.