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Today's News

  • Chiefland dominates early in win against Bronson

    Chiefland strung together one of its more satisfying performances on the season against Bronson Jan. 23 to lead by as much as 23 points in the second half.

    It was senior night for the Indians, who don’t have a senior on the roster, making for an ironic subtext behind the proceedings.

    Bronson, showing its pride against its a chief rival, made a run in the fourth quarter, but CMHS had enough cushion to absorb the blow at that point, as it went on to prevail 63-58.

    Chiefland a well-rounded scoring distribution, with newcomer Quay Brodus leading the way with 15 points. Jarrett Jerrels jumped out with seven points in the opening quarter to finish with 11 on the night for CMHS; Ty Corbin (five rebounds) and Austin Adams chipped in 10 and nine points, respectively. Payne Parnell had seven points and four boards for Chiefland.

  • Indians surrender early lead to Oak Hall

    The Chiefland boys’ basketball team had its share of mini-surges in the second half against Oak Hall Jan. 26 in the CMHS gym.

    But the Indians could never completely shake the deficit they carried into the break, as they fell 68-63 to the Gainesville private school in what turned out to be a disappointing, for CMHS, but mostly thrilling final quarter of action.

    Chiefland was under serious threat early in the fourth quarter as the Eagles pulled ahead 50-37. But back-to-back dazzling plays by sophomore Ty Corbin, including a 3-pointer and a behind-the-back assist to Sedrik Moultrie, energized the crowd and made the deficit manageable once again at 50-42.

    When OHS responded with a couple of buckets, Chiefland junior Payne Parnell connected on a 3 to take it back to an eight-point game.

    From there, Oak Hall remained ahead by 8-12 points, until an Austin Adams steal and assist – to Quay Brodus – and another Corbin 3 cut the Eagle lead to 62-58 with 3:05 remaining. Adams later added a 3-pointer of his own, but the Indians were done for the night scoring from the floor thereafter.

  • The best present I ever bought my wife

    I struggled this last year to figure out what to get my wife for Christmas this year. I’m a good gift-giver and I started trying to look around in October. My birthday is in October so I’m usually thinking about gifts then.

    She didn’t drop any hints. If she did, I wasn’t listening until finally, I just came out and asked, “What do you want for Christmas?”

    “I want an Alexa,” she said.

    “I thought you said they were a waste of money and that you didn’t want one,” I queried.

    “I didn’t, but my sisters have one and they keep telling me how much fun they are having and all the things it will do,” she replied.

    I have to remember to thank her sisters for putting an Amazon Echo in her mind because it is absolutely the best gift I ever got her for myself.

  • Citizen of the Year wanted

    The Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce is seeking the names of people who made extraordinary effort in good citizenship in 2017. These are people who have changed things for the better, who perhaps are examples of selfless volunteer service.

    This special citizen may display a broad range of contribution and achievement or be an individual unsurpassed in commitment to provide for a particular cause. Considerations may include:

    Significant contribution to the well-being of the community through personal service; personal effort that has made a lasting, noteworthy, and positive difference; perception as a role model for good citizenship and volunteerism; inspiring personal attributes, such as versatility, perseverance, devotion, and diplomacy; contributions above and beyond those expected; sustained dedication to a cause or effort, or to community service; an exceptional or extraordinary history of achievement in local philanthropic endeavors; courage in overcoming extreme adversity; a selfless act of bravery or generosity or performing service without expectation of compensation or recognition.

  • Sheriff's Department honors its own

    The Levy County Sheriff’s Department held its annual awards ceremony Wednesday, Jan. 24, in Courtroom A of the Levy County Courthouse where it was standing-room only.

    Just before the ceremony started, with everyone waiting in anticipation, an official voice boomed, “All rise!” Catching everyone off guard, many in the gallery automatically stood up, before they realized a judge had not taken the bench. The courtroom erupted in laughter at the good-natured joke. The ceremony followed that light-hearted moment with stories of benevolence, heroism, spirit, valor and fellowship.

    Sheriff Bobby McCallum welcomed everyone to the awards ceremony, followed by Chief Deputy W.O. Brett Beauchamp giving the invocation and Colonel Mike Sheffield leading in the Pledge of Allegiance.

    McCallum welcomed County Court Judge James T. Browning, thanking him for the use of his courtroom and recognized Property Appraiser Oz Barker. McCallum thanked his employees for the great job that they have done throughout 2017 and all the years before that.

  • 'Dramatic' yard sale Saturday

    Do not forget this date: Saturday, Feb. 3, from 7:30 a.m. until 1 p.m.

    The CMHS Drama/AP Art History student group is holding a yard sale in front of the high school to raise funds for its Spring Break trip to New York. This educational trip will include visits to the 911 Memorial and Museum, Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Natural History Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Empire State Building and a Broadway showing of “The Lion King.”

    The yard sale will have items such as Clay Skeet Throwers, an electric fish knife, furniture, baby items household items and appliances, electronics ranging from gaming systems and games to HDTVs and movies. We also have sports equipment, clothes, and almost everything else under the sun. Sixty-seven individuals will be represented, so there will be something for everyone.

  • Sheriff’s office holds crisis training

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    Levy County Sheriff’s Deputy Grant Sandlin presented free crisis training class covering steps that should be taken when under attack. Approximately 25 people attended the training.

    The training took place at Bronson Middle High School.

    Sandlin began by talking about how humans react to crisis situations by fighting, fleeing, or freezing. He continued by saying how important it was to plan reactions, which consists of three options: running, hiding or fighting.

    “Your response can be just as fluid as the event,” Sandlin said. “In other words, you may need to change your options for reacting as the event unfolds.”

    He then covered some important points about each option.

    If running is the option chosen he instructed the class to plan an escape route, leave belongings behind, evacuate even if others around you freeze and warn others not to enter the area on your way out.

    “Do not attempt to evacuate or treat the wounded, instead tell them to try to stop the bleeding and play dead,” Sandlin said.

  • Slain deputy is memorialized

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    A hero from long ago was honored Jan. 25 when a portion of U.S. Highway 19/98 in Otter Creek was named after him.

    The hero’s name was Atticus Haygood Ellzey, who was slain Jan. 28, 1945 in Otter Creek.

    Levy County Sheriff Bobby McCallum spoke at the dedication ceremony. He was followed by Levy County Commission Chair John Meeks and James Ellzey, grandson of the slain deputy. Nearly all of the remaining Ellzey relatives, from the Levy County area, were present for the ceremony.

    Sheriff McCallum opened the ceremony by sharing the story of Atticus’ bravery that led him to be shot in the line of duty Jan. 28, 1945. The deputy was called to assist at a bar in Otter Creek because of some unruly patrons. Ellzey asked the two men to leave the establishment. They lured Ellzey into the woods off Highway 19 in Otter Creek where they ambushed and shot him. The deputy was able to identify the two men, and they were subsequently sent to prison.

    “Sheriff Ellzey is the only Levy County Sheriff in history to be killed in the line of duty,” MCCallum said.

  • Indians misfire on layups in loss to Dixie County

    If there was an encouraging development for Chiefland in their loss to Dixie County Jan. 16, it was that the Indians, despite missing so many layups and struggling to find much momentum on offense beyond point guard Jalen Rutledge, remained in the game until the final two minutes, trailing by just six points at one point in the final quarter.

    But the misses proved too costly in the end, as the Bears pulled away in the final moments, stretching out their advantage for a 79-63 win in Chiefland.

    Dixie County is still alive for the No. 2 seed in District 1A-7 after beating Trenton 61-53 on Jan. 22. Bell is the top seed.

    After trailing by as much as 15 in the third quarter, Chiefland got its deficit down to 54-48 early in the four on an Austin Adams floater. Dixie County responded with back-to-back buckets, including one off a pickpocket takeaway, before L.J. Jenkins converted on three free throws to get Chiefland back within seven.

    The Bears continued to toy with a double-digit margin however, and CMHS junior Payne Parnell gave his team its final single-digit margin of deficit with three free throws just before the two-minute mark.

  • Lady Indians spear Bears

    The Chiefland girls’ basketball found itself in the envious position against Dixie County of building up a big enough lead to allow playing time for its entire bench.

    The Lady Indians built up a 41-13 lead in the third on the heels of a Colby Reed 3-pointer.

    The playing time for the less experience varsity talent led to a surge by Dixie County, which cut its deficit to 49-36 with 2:45 remaining.

    But Reed issued the final dagger with her second 3 of the game, as Chiefland went on to prevail 58-37.

    The lanky junior finished with a team-high 14 points, and up-and-coming eighth-grader Nikki Fuller (13 points) and rebound machines Courtney Hayes (11 points) and Naja Martin (12 points) joined her in double figures.

    Hayes and Fuller, who was 3 of 5 at the foul line, each nabbed eight rebounds, and Martin added seven.