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Today's News

  • Easter morning in Cedar Key feels serene

    Serenity surrounds me.

    It is Easter Sunday in Cedar Key.

    I gaze across the Gulf.

    It is pre-dawn.

    It is those minutes between the dark of night and sunrise.

    The moments are precious.

    Fleeting.

    Like life itself — finite.

    The soul enters the body.

    The soul leaves the body.

    Everything beyond — eternal.

    The sun rises in the East

    On Easter morning in Cedar Key.

    I gaze across the Gulf.

    My eyes look on.

    There is nothing to see except in my mind’s own eye.

    A small fishing vessel.

    Like life itself.

    The boat leaves shore.

    The boat returns.

    Everything beyond — eternal.

    The Bible is filled with references to water beginning with Gen. 1:2 (KJV), “And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was on the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.”

  • CMHS track standouts compete at prestigious Florida Relays

    The athletes of the Chiefland track and field team that competed at the 2018 Pepsi Florida Relays in Gainesville over spring break faced an uphill challenge, as they ran and hurdled against some of the top competition from around the state.

    But the Indians’ appearance – and effort – was impressive in itself, as they boasted what was likely the youngest group of runners at the University of Florida-hosted three-day meet from March 29 to March 31. And the experience was invaluable for Coach Lee Bell’s teams, as they turned in performances on a state-of-the-art track against fields of competitors that rivaled those at the state championships. The runners had to deal with long breaks between events, up to five or six hours in some cases, and rainy conditions on Friday.

  • CMHS quintet snatch wins in Monticello

    Five different Chiefland athletes combined for eight individual wins while the Indians collected an additional 18 top-3 finishes at the Jefferson County Tri Meet March 22 in Monticello.

    Reagan Hudson led the charge for CMHS with three first-place finishes – Girls 100 Hurdles (20.57 seconds); Girls 300 Hurdles (1:00.75) and Girls Discus Throw (75 feet, 9 inches) – and a second place (Girls High Jump, 4-04.0).

    Lady Indians junior Courtney Hayes prevailed in the Girls High Jump at 4-08.0.

    Sophomore Luke Stockman led the Indian boys with a first-place finish in the Boys 1600 meter run (5 minutes, 24.61 seconds) and the 3200 (2 mile) at 12:03.16. Senior Tramaine Brown collected first in the Boys Long Jump (17-02.0) for CMHS.

    For the Lady Indians, eighth-grader Lauren Jones took first in the Girls 1600 (5:48.43) and won unopposed in the 3200 (12:29.08).

    Senior Quay Brodus nearly added another win for Chiefland, as he tied for first in the Boys High Jump at 36-04.0, but was marked at second on the tiebreaker. Brodus added a No. 3 finished in the shot put (17-03.5).

  • CMHS track to honor past coaches

    Chiefland Middle High School track and field is hosting the first-ever C. Doyle McCall and Wendell Corbin Honorary Invitational Track Meet Thursday, April 5, in honor of two coaches who built the foundation of the program.

    McCall, best known as a legendary football coach for the Indians, founded the track program in 1953, and Corbin helped take it to new heights as a longtime coach. A special presentation will be held at 3:15 p.m. before the meet to honor the two coaches. McCall is unable to attend due to health reasons, so a member of one of his first track teams, Jolyn Corbin, will accept the honor on his former coach’s behalf.

    With six schools slated to participate, including Bronson, Williston, Mayo-Lafayette and Jefferson County, the meet will be as large or larger than any meet in recent years hosted at CMHS.

    The meet will start at 3:30 p.m., beginning with the 4x800 relay, followed by the field events, and then the remaining running events.

    The CMHS Running Sports Booster Club is putting on the meet with award sponsorships from Bar-B-Q Bill’s and Chiefland Farm Supply.

  • Compromise now or lose later

    We don’t use datelines at the Citizen because we are a hyperlocal newspaper because, as a general rule, we do not publish anything that is not related to Levy County. If we did, then the rule is that a dateline should tell the reader the basic information for the story was obtained in the datelined city. There are 30 American cities that stand alone without state names. All of those cities have a global identity for one reason or another. I could argue that Columbine, Newtown and Parkland could be added to the list because those three cities have a global identity.

    I am not advocating for the government to come and take someone’s gun and neither am I advocating for someone with a gun to take away someone’s child.

  • CK Open nabs over $5.5K for Fire Rescue

    The momentum continues to grow for the annual Cedar Key Open Golf Tournament.

    On March 7, the charity event set a new mark for itself in its third edition, raising $5,513 for the Cedar Key Volunteer Fire and Rescue.

    In three years, it’s raised $13,139 for local causes. Last year’s funds went toward the Cedar Key Library.

    With 88 competitors and 22 teams, participation also saw an uptick for the Open.

    The event is truly a collaborative effort, both in support and locations. It’s held at the Chiefland Golf and Country Club, and then continues at Big Deck Bar and Grill in Cedar Key, where a low country boil dinner is served courtesy of Ricky Cook. The Big Deck sponsors the CK Open.

    There was a new foursome champion this year in the scramble tournament (teammates play best ball). The team of Milt Gillis, Joe Brinkman, Skipper Henderson and Alden Davis combined to fire a tournament-best 16-under par 56.

  • Lady hoops standouts recognized at banquet

    The Chiefland Middle High School girls’ basketball program has promising talent coming up through its ranks, and lose just one senior starter next season.

    To realize its tantalizing potential, however, its young student-athletes will have to put in the gym time in the offseason.

    At the Lady Indians’ end-of-the-season banquet at Hardeetown Baptist Church March 12, the girls were honored for their contributions and impressive improvements throughout the year. It was also a chance for coaches Buddy Vicker and Jason Whistler – and CMHS Principal Dennis Webber – to paint of picture of what is required to be great going forward.

    Webber, in his introduction, unofficially introduced the theme of the evening in quoting women’s basketball coaching legend Pat Summitt, citing her claim that the competitor needs to “continually raise the bar.”

  • The wonderment of technological advances

    I used to think how wonderful it must have been for someone born in the 1890s, like my grandpa and lived through the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, two world wars, the Ford assembly line, airplanes, space travel, the telegraph, telephone, radio, television — everything we use all the time and don’t give a second thought — my grandpa saw in its very beginning.

  • Marijuana ordinance bans dispensaries

    The Levy County Commission on March 20 adopted an ordinance banning medical marijuana dispensaries in unincorporated areas while treating its growing and cultivation like other nurseries.

    The unanimous passing of the ordinance, based on a motion from Mike Joyner and a second from Matt Brooks, came after the second of two public hearings on the matter held at the Courthouse in March.

    The ordinance is consistent with the Board’s earlier proposal, based on one of the recommended options from county attorney Anne Bast Brown. In seeking guidance for the ordinance from the Board, Brown noted that the state’s current direction on the issue provided legal buffering for the banning of dispensaries, but that the county could be at a severe legal disadvantage if it discriminated against medical marijuana nurseries.

    The ordinance, which replaces the moratorium on medical marijuana, treats growers and cultivators of medical marijuana like any other agricultural industry, subject to zoning and land-use regulations.

  • Business Council discusses revenue

    The Nature Coast Business Development Council discussed generating its own income source, industrial development sites and an offer from Williston to locate in the new city hall in the fall at its March 8 meeting in the College of Central Florida Jack Wilkinson Campus.

    Memberships is an avenue of raising money beyond the amount provided by the county.

    The reason for an additional revenue stream is to give the council more flexibility and while the idea has been discussed for a time, the membership drive was finally kicked off earlier in the year.

    Councilmembers discussed the governor’s Economic Development Fund. The governor included $85 million in the fund for the next fiscal year just as he did in the current fiscal year. Of that amount, only about $35 million have been allocated for grants in this fiscal year so there is still money available. Some communities are gearing up to submit additional applications. It was suggested that NCBDC members think about what the organization can submit to help Levy County and communities to become more competitive to attract jobs and help businesses grow.