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Today's News

  • Trio-led Lady Indians to clash with Lady Tigers

    The Chiefland softball team has been far from perfect to start the season, just ask first-year head coach Jimmy Anderson.

    But its record heading into the March 6 meeting was flawless, at least, and the team’s three returning starters – ace pitcher Kensley Durrance, shortstop Erika Gilliam and first-base slugger Macie Thomas – have been the most consistent factor behind the success.

    During their latest stretch, the Lady Indians completed a season sweep of Class 8A Buchholz with a 6-1 win March 5 in Gainesville; came from behind at Class 5A North Marion March 2 to defeat the Lady Colts 10-7; and got past district foe Branford 4-1 on March 1.

    The March 5 win improved the team’s mark to 9-0 overall; the Lady Indians are 3-0 in District 1A-7 play.

    Meanwhile, Trenton cruised past its first pair of district opponents and boasted a 6-1 record heading into its March 6 meeting with Bronson. The Lady Tigers’ only blemish was a 4-2 loss at Class 5A Keystone Heights, whose only defeat was a 3-2 loss to reigning state champion Union County in its season opener.

  • CF hosts Preview Night for future enrollees

    The College of Central Florida Levy Campus held its Preview Night March 1 for students looking to continue their education at the local campus.

    Attendees had their $30 admission fees waived for their participation.

    Workshops were available for prospective students, offering guidance on topics like financial aid, dual enrollment, CF student life and registration.

    Additionally, professors from various fields – including economics, biological sciences, humanities, welding and emergency medical services – hosted stations where they answered questions on degree and certificate programs and directed students to helpful literature on hand.

    Administrators also helped prospective students with enrollment inquiries, and there were representatives from the University of South Florida and University of Central Florida to inform students on more long-term educational paths that begin at CF.

    Current seniors from Chiefland Middle High School and Cedar Key School were among those attending the event.

    The Ocala and Lecanto campuses held similar events.

  • SCORE to assist Levy businesses

    By Michael Bates, Citrus County Chronicle

    The Citrus County SCORE chapter got the green light this month to expand into Levy County.

    That will be a big deal to businesses there because it will have closer representation and no longer have to rely on its distant SCORE affiliate all the way in Gainesville for business assistance, said Jim Green, chairman of the Citrus SCORE.

    “We thought it would make more sense for us to do it,” Green said.

    Now the work begins, he said, to meet with Levy County civic, community and government leaders to get the word out. That process starts this week.

    “We’ve been here for 25 years (in Citrus County), but they don’t know us there,” he said.

    Green said he has appointed a Levy County expansion team among his volunteers who will make those contacts.

  • City approves grant application for police cars

    By C.L. Watson, Citizen Correspondent

    Tri County Community Resource Center Director Beverly Goodman requested the city donate use of the Tommy Usher Pineland Center for an event with chef Laura Fowler Goss.

    The event is a parent and child cooking class instructed by Goss March 21 from 10 a.m. to noon. Commissioner Teresa Barron made the motion to donate use of the center. Commissioner Donald Lawrence seconded. The motion was unanimously approved.

    City Manager Mary Ellzey presented the USDA Community Facility Grant for purchase of four police vehicles. In October 2017, the commission gave approval to file the application for the 4-to-1 matching grant. The USDA would pay $140,595 and the cost to the city would be $46,865 for four new Chevy Tahoes. Lawrence made the motion that was seconded by Barron and unanimously approved.

    Police Chief Scott Anderson informed commissioners that police officers would soon need their body cams replaced and the wireless printers in eight patrol units needed updating.

  • County may join opioid lawsuits

    In a scene reminiscent of the successful lawsuits against Big Tobacco in the 1990s, pharmaceutical companies have become a target for their role in the opioid crisis.

    The Levy County Commission on March 6 signaled its intent to join in on the action in order to recover costs that the opioid addiction has wreaked on local services and healthcare. The lawsuits, both federal and state, contend that the drug makers have knowingly misled users about the harmful effects of their painkillers, leading to widespread addiction and long-term health problems.

    County attorney Anne Bast Brown said at the meeting she has consulted with other counties that have reached agreements with firms to join in lawsuits, and has spoken with law firms seeking business from counties. She says counties like Alachua and Osceola have signed onto agreements with firms that avoid any costs up front for the counties, and those counties are shielded through the agreements from counter-suits from the pharmaceuticals.

  • Citrus County teacher removed from classroom for racist podcast

    By Carly Zervis, Citrus County Chronicle

    A Citrus County middle school teacher removed from the classroom after being outed as the host of a racially charged podcast has no record of suspensions or other disciplinary action by the Citrus County School District, an examination of her personnel file revealed Monday.

    Dayanna Volitich, originally from Aliquippa, Pennsylvania, and in her second year as a teacher in the district, was hired in August 2016 as a middle school social studies teacher, the position she continued to occupy at the time of her removal.

    According to a resume included with her employment application, Volitich earned a bachelor’s degree in history from Ohio State University in May 2014 and was pursuing a master’s degree in educational studies at Johns Hopkins University when she applied for a Citrus County teaching position in June 2016. The Chronicle was unable to confirm Monday whether she obtained the degree.

  • Indian bats frosty in season opener at WMHS

    With just one available preseason game and multiple starters just returning from basketball, the Chiefland baseball team didn’t have the luxury of easing into the season.

    Instead, the Indians were on the road against rival Williston for their opener, facing a strong Red Devil pitching rotation and a lineup with nine seniors.

    After that, CMHS celebrated its home opener Feb. 27 with a meeting against reigning state champion Trenton, which was played after the press deadline.

    Chiefland’s pitching, anchored by a strong relief outing by Jaron Feagle, and its defense helped the club hang around with Williston even when the bats weren’t popping. But the Red Devils, behind five no-hit innings by Levi Pickel and a two-run insurance rally in the third, prevailed 3-1.

  • CMHS boys, girls place 2nd in track opener

    The Chiefland boys’ and girls’ track and field teams each placed second in their five-school meets Feb. 22 at C. Doyle McCall Field.

    The meet also include Bronson, Cedar Key, Bell and Trenton. The Lady Eagles placed third.

    The CMHS boys picked up relay wins in the 4x110 yard, with the team of Jalen Rutledge, Lane Studstill, Fry Raymer and Tramaine Brown, at 46.75 second, and in the 4x440, with Brown, Paul Davis, Hector Barajas and Jahvel Blair combining for a winning time of 4 minutes, 3 seconds.

    Chiefland senior Lane Studstill picked up a second place in the 100-meter dash at 11.16 seconds. L.J. Jenkins took second for CMHS in the high hurdles (19.21 seconds) and 440-yard dash (57.50 seconds), and placed third in the 330-yard hurdles.

    Chiefland’s Jonathan Cannon was a fraction of a second off pace of a first-place finish in the 880-yard run, as he notched second at 2:39.86.

    Luke Stockman collected a pair of second-place finishes for Chiefland, both in the 1-mile run (5:29) and the 2-mile run (12:17). Brown took third in the long jump; Raymer was third in the 220-yard dash for the Indians.

  • Lady Indians remain undefeated

    The Chiefland softball team has met every challenge thrown its way in the young season, as its improved to 6-0 Feb. 26 in a 16-5 win against Taylor County with a pair of eight-run rallies.

    In the prior week, the Lady Indians went 2-0 on the road against Levy County opponents, knocking off Williston 8-4 and Bronson 6-2. In between those games, Chiefland posted a 6-0 win over Class 8A Gainesville-Buchholz Feb. 22.

    The Lady Bobcats from Gainesville presented a new wrinkle for the club – left-handed pitching.

    But five different Lady Indians – Tristen Drummond (2 for 4), Macie Thomas, Gabriel Stancil and catcher Karlie Meeks – each doubled for CMHS.

  • Let students march

    This isn’t about taking away guns or repealing the Second Amendment to the Constitution, but there are far too many mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, extended family members, neighbors, friends, co-workers, fishing buddies, church members and teammates who are hurting from the loss of those people.

    People question whether or not the students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland should be granting interviews and marching in Tallahassee or later this month in Washington, D.C.

    Verbalizing trauma is cathartic for them and maybe, just maybe, they will force an open, honest and painful debate the nation needs to have. I would feel better about them protesting if the George Clooney, Steven Spielberg and Jeffrey Katzenberg families and Oprah Winfrey hadn’t donated $500,000 to the March for Life movement.