.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • The staff of the Chiefland Citizen is committed to serving the people of Levy County and the surrounding area in the most professional, courteous manner possible.

    To strengthen that commitment, we offer some tips that will help you help us fulfill our promise in the year ahead,

    1) If you need coverage of an event, please give the editor at least a week's notice to verify reporter availability. Too often requests are made on too short notice and no one is available.

  • I have almost 200 pounds of black walnuts, some riding shotgun in my car and some weighing down the trunk.

    Problem is, I don't know what to do with them.

    How I came to acquire so many was a bad communication gap.

    Sometime around Thanksgiving, Tom called to say he and future son-in-law Brett were raking leaves and had a difficult time because of all the %^$#! black walnuts.

    "Black walnuts!" I exclaimed. "I would love to have some for baking. Save me some and when I come up Christmas, I'll get them."

  • Happy New Year!

    Having eaten my fair share of hog jowls, rice, black-eyed peas and collard greens on Jan. 1, 2008, I sat back and pondered the near future.

    I wondered about the unfolding events in 2008. Will Tarmac America obtain a special exception to mine hundreds of millions of tons of limerock from the Gulf Hammock Area?

    Will Ameris Health Systems obtain funding to build Tri-County Hospital in Chiefland?

    Will State Attorney Bill Cervone prosecute alleged voter fraud cases in Levy County?

  • Every day that we are given the chance to wake up from our slumber and put our feet on the floor is another opportunity to start with a clean slate and start life anew.

    Unfortunately most of us tend to carry the burdens and travails of yesterday into our todays and that clouds our tomorrows.

    As 2008 sits on the horizon, it also marks the chance for new beginnings, new attitudes.

    What will you do with it?

    The first thing I challenge each of you to do is look back at 2007 and reflect on what was right with your life.

  • I wish I had money to buy gifts for all the people who touch my life in the course of a year.

    But if I did, you would be calling me Oprah instead of Carolyn, because those people are legion.

    Each year I write a Christmas letter to the family and friends I communicate with less than I should and this year as I thought of a summation, I knew what it had to be:

    "Except for a few minor things, I am very, very happy."

    And when I think about those minor things that trouble me, I realize how blessed I am.

  • W e take pleasure in answering thus prominently the communication below, expressing at the same time our great gratification that its faithful author is numbered among the friends of The Sun:

    Dear Editor:

    I am 8 years old. Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus. Papa says, "If you see it in The Sun, it's so." Please tell me the truth, is there a Santa Claus?

    Virginia O'Hanlon

  • Tomorrow is Dec. 7. Exactly 66 years ago today the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor and Franklin Delano Roosevelt declared this date as "a day that will live in infamy."

    On this date, 66 years ago the United States, shocked and angered by this unprovoked attack, entered into a war to defend our people, our nation and our freedom.

    Men and women across this great land rose to the call and answered this atrocity with defiance and a determination that we Americans would not be beaten.

  • It's no secret . . . I love Christmas. From crowded stores to decorations to kitchens redolent with the aromas of cinnamon and vanilla, it's all good to me.

    Every year since I can remember, I've always vowed to get an earlier start, plan better, stretch out the chores and actually enjoy the holiday I love so much.

    It's only a few days into December and I can already tell I am going to fail miserably at my goals.

  • Hay and Ink

    When I arrive home from the newspaper office, my wife Sharon occasionally tells me that I smell like ink.

    This is not a bad thing. It's just a fact resulting from my close proximity to the giant press that cranks out tens of thousands of newspapers each week. About five thousand of those weekly newspapers are copies of the Chiefland Citizen.

    The fragrance of ink permeates the building where I work and it follows me home every now and then. This odor serves as a reminder from being part of the local press corps.

  • It's becoming more apparent that soon I will be the last hold-out for sentimentality and tradition.

    Starting with Thanksgiving dinner.

    Dressing, to go with the turkey, is a necessity–whether you like it or not.

    Ditto the pumpkin pie.

    I had neither last week.

    I was part of a group of people who decided a potluck dinner was the easiest solution.

    Neither dressing nor pie was my responsibility.

    I wish it had been.

    It didn't feel like Thanksgiving without the two things that evoke childhood memories and make me all warm and fuzzy inside.

  • Will he or won't he? That's the buzz around Chiefland, as Eighth Judicial Circuit State Attorney Bill Cervone continues weighing evidence of alleged voter fraud cases brought to light in August after the city election.

    On Sept. 27, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement handed Cervone the evidence it collected after a five-week investigation.

    Two months later, the attorney is still sitting on his hands. He is drawing out a process that has left lives in chaos and seems in no hurry to bring the issue to a conclusion once and for all.

  • I like to shower. I enjoy clean clothes. I have to have my coffee in the morning–and night–lots of it.

    But those things take water. Daily.

    And for months now I have sympathized with my North Georgia friends who are suffering through the worst drought in 100 years.

    Lakes Hartwell and Lanier are mud puddles. Docks are useless and more importantly good potable water is a rare commodity for tens of thousands of people.

  • As editor of the Glades County Democrat in the late 1980s, I convinced then-publisher Richard Hitt to buy a modem so that I could transmit stories from Moore Haven to Clewiston.

    My friend Jeff Roslow was the editor of the Clewiston News and we served readers in Glades and Hendry counties. Internet service did not exist then in Moore Haven or Clewiston.

    I transmitted stories via modem from my IBM home computer in Moore Haven to the Macintosh computer at the Clewiston office.

  • On Nov. 11, America will celebrate the greatest heroes of our time-this nation's veterans. These men and women sacrificed of themselves, dedicating their efforts to the cause we call Freedom.

    Freedom always comes with a price and for many of these servicemen and women, the price was often supreme.

    From the Argonne Forest to the sands of Iwo Jima; from Pork Chop Hill in Korea to Hamburger Hill in Vietnam; and back across the waters to the Persian Gulf and now in Iraq, lives were lost, dreams were shattered and still they willingly gave.

  • For almost a year the Chiefland Citizen has been in the beginning stages of creating a more reader-friendly, informative website.

    At long last, after trials, mistakes, crashed computers and a few missed deadlines, this week we go live with what can be best described as a work in progress.

    Online readers will still find us at www.chieflandcitizen.com.

    We haven't moved, but our accommodations are more modern, more detailed, more in-depth than what you're used to seeing when you log on.

  • The Chiefland Citizen is very generous to its employees.

    This year the company offered to not only pay for flu shots for the staff, but even had a nurse come on site to administer the vaccine in the middle of the workday so there could be no excuses about inability to get one.

    The sign up sheet was posted for over a month and daily I watched name after name queue on it.

    Mine was not added and a couple co-workers asked why I hadn't signed up.

    I met their inquiries with a shrug and a quick change of subject and moved on.

  • I recently backed my 2006 Jeep Liberty into a Mitsubishi.

    The little car was so close to my vehicle?s rear bumper that I did not see it when I looked in the rear or side view mirrors. From my perspective, it was invisible. I remind readers to look very, very carefully before backing up.

    Now I will address other issues relevant to invisibility.

    I went to a three-day United Methodist Men?s retreat in Leesburg from Oct. 19 through 21. There were 359 visible attendees from 44 churches, including the five men from First United Methodist Church of Chiefland.