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Features

  • It was a cold, snowy day in November, and Myrtle had to walk to a bus station to get to work. The time was 7:20 a.m., and she arrived at the station at 7:50 a.m. Myrtle boarded the bus and sat behind the friendly driver.

    She was hired at the age of 16 for an electric company and had been there for two years. While at work, she received a phone call and was offered a position for bookkeeper and accountant and accepted it.

  • Nosey says...

    In the old days it seemed to take forever to get something done, but today things are done in the blink of an eye. We all know that Francis Scott Key wrote The Star Spangled Banner during the assault on Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor back in 1812, but it wasn't until 1814 that words were put to music and it was being published all over the country. It was over a hundred years later, in fact in 1931, when President Herbert Hoover made it our National Anthem.

  • AARP held its regular monthly meeting on Dec. 15, 2009, at the Spring House Lodge of Otter Springs at 10:30 a.m.

    We are all very happy that the officers who served us in 2009 will also be serving us in 2010. The officers were sworn in by Meveree Pope, former District Area Coordinator of AARP.

  • It’s been almost 30 years since Pat Wilson graduated from Williston High School, but the boy who became the man Jim Pitt has never forgotten the town, community, school and friends who helped shape his character.

    Pitt, an actor who plays a space shuttle captain in James Cameron’s Avatar that opened Friday, dropped in last week to catch up with old friends and remind people he is still the person they knew.

  • This year's Christmas and Winter Festival Parade, which took place on Dec. 5, was bigger, brighter, and better than ever.  The enthusiastic entries and over 25 floats made the judges' job tough, and resulted in some tied scores.  

    The Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce congratulates the following as standing out above the rest of the best.  Parade award winners are:

    1st Place winner:Girl Scouts of Bronson Troop 970

    Tied for 2nd Place: Double Sink 4-H Club,     Jones Plumbing Airboat No. 3,  Joe's Towing

  • While ABC’s “Extreme Makeover Home Edition” taps into the community spirit to help one family, the show also offers a way volunteers can make a difference for the entire community, and no carpentry skills are needed.

     Through Dec. 14, donors in Chiefland can also get involved by stopping by LifeSouth’s donor at 2202 N. Young Blvd. in the Winn-Dixie Center Shopping Center.  All donors will get a limited edition Extreme makeover: Home Edition Blood Donor T-shirt.

  • Forty-six people battled the rain and elements to attend the second Levy County Sheriffs Fundraiser For the Cates Family. The event raised $2,300 for the five children of Carrie Cates of Bronson, who died after being struck by a vehicle  on Oct 9. The children are being raised by her parents.

     Although over 87 people had signed up for the class, the turnout was impressive considering the bad weather, Lt. Scott Finnen, the event coordinator, said.

  • Suwannee Valley Players announces the second weekend of its production of “Not a Creature Was Stirring ... not even a moose,” a comedy written by Pat Cook.

  • When military men and women are treated for extended periods at any one of this country’s 1,200 medical facilities, their recuperation and peace of mind is enhanced by the support of their families.

    But everyone cannot afford hotel rooms for long periods.

    That’s where Fisher House comes in.

    Founded in 1990 by Zachary Fisher and his wife Elizabeth, Fisher House provides free accommodations giving veterans and their families a home away from home during treatment or rehab, said Rick Fabiani, president of the Gainesville Fisher House Foundation.

  • The Levy County Quilt Museum will hold its 26th annual quilt show starting on Nov. 26.

    Winnelle Horne, the museums director and co-founder, said the event would run for 10 days and feature over 100 quilts made by the Log Cabin Quilters. About 2/3 of the quilts are hand made, and people wishing to purchase a quilt can expect to pay anywhere from $150 to several hundred dollars.

    There’s no charge to attend the show, she said, and food will be available. The last Saturday of the event, Dec. 5, will have music and a chicken and dumpling dinner.

  • The 5th Annual Nature Coast Toys for Tots Ride raised $16,631 to be used to purchase toys for children in the tri-county area of Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties.

    Of that amount, $10,270 was cleared on the raffle of a new Toys for Tots bike built by Gulf Coast Sledz, after the bills were paid for building it. Gulf Coast Sledz donated the 400 hours of build time for the bike valued at $32.000.

  • Airheads from all over the state converged on a 45-acre farm located between Cedar Key and Chiefland recently for the Second Annual Suwannee River Tech Day and Camp.

    The international Airheads Beemer Club is for riders who own BMW bikes with air-cooled engines. Most anything that happens with an Airhead Beemer can be repaired on the side of the road with the tool kit that BMW provides — with the right knowledge, of course.

    That’s why the Airheads motto is “Simple by Choice.”

  • Ninety-year-old Olga, a long-term resident at Tri-County Nursing Home, in Trenton, looked a little confused when a small group of people entered her room asking questions about expecting visitors Thursday.

    But her confusion melted when she saw that two of the group’s members were short, hairy and of the canine variety.

    “I love animals,” she said as she caressed one of the dogs sitting on her bed, “ and they are so adorable.”

  • Three miles from Williston off a bumpy hilly road, a passage through scrub and pasture leads the unsuspecting traveler to the utopian sanctuary that Dr. Raymond Webber calls home.

    More than 400 species of plants thrive on his 100-acre bit of paradise that has been more than 16 years in the making.

    “Not many people in Florida have their house built into the side of a cliff,” Webber, an endodonist by trade, explains as he begins his trek through the assorted gardens that he has designed.

    Indeed, the vista from this porch is breathtakingly beautiful.

  • Levy County will have less stray and feral cats breeding on its streets thanks to a local Trap-Neuter-Return program.

    On Thursday, Oct. 29, members of Sheltering Hands Inc., an organization that rescues and finds homes for pets in Marion and Levy Counties, received about 39 feral cats needing to be spayed or neutered.

  • A local Levy County group joined the fight against two global epidemics — hunger and obesity — by participating in the "Lose For Good" campaign. 

    As local Weight Watchers members lose weight, they’ve also been collecting food to donate to Bronson United Methodist Church to help their neighbors in need. Within seven weeks, the group lost 854.6 pounds, and collected 488 pounds of food. 

  • O.C. Graham was once like the rest of us. He liked to party, said Aljoseph Carnegie, president of the Tri-County Branch of the NAACP at its 19th Annual Freedom Fund Banquet at Tommy Usher Community Center in Chiefland on Oct. 24.

    “He liked to party until God took him in,” Carnegie, a Raleigh resident, said. “And he was blind, really blind, until God restored his sight.”

  • The sunlight strained at the edges between clusters of bromeliad-laden tupelo trees, water oaks and cabbage palms.  

    Thin shafts of light breaking through the canopy revealed flitting birds and clouds of mosquitoes hovering over black water dotted with the heart-shaped leaves of cow lilies.

    Snakes, in search of prey, slithered in and out of the murk below, and fiddler crabs scurried over rocks and tiny islands of gnarled tree roots.

  • A few years, ago Earl Damann, of Williston, saw an article in the paper about a new group seeking volunteers.

    “Oh, I think it would be fun,” he told his wife Stella. He called the telephone number.

    They joined the fledgling group Citizens on Patrol, and after more than 7,250 hours of service to the Levy County Sheriff’s Office he’s giving up the fun because a heredity kidney disease is forcing him to the sidelines. That’s a little over 906 days of 8-hour shifts.

  • Seahorse Key gets its name from the shape of the island, but its rich history is complex: a detention camp for displaced Seminole Indians, an outpost with a lighthouse built in 1854 to guide ships into the port of Cedar Key and a prison during the Civil War.