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Features

  • Area bicycle riders raised about $5,200 last Saturday during the first Cycle for Education in Chiefland. The event began along the bike trail behind Chiefland Shopping Center and ran through Old Town and back for a ride of about 25 miles. The fundraiser attracted 33 riders and benefited the Levy County Schools Foundation's general fund. School Board member Paige Brookins, of Chiefland, was the chairperson for the Cycle for Education, spending a considerable amount of time planning and preparing last Saturday's ride.

  • If spring is here, can the Wild Hog Canoe & Kayak Race be far behind?  Not likely. The Bronson AmVets Post #88 and the Levy Association for Retarded Citizens (LARC)  are gearing up for the 33rd running of this fun paddle to benefit charity.

    At 7:30 a.m. on Saturday, April 17, paddlers from near and far will gather at the river to participate in one of the six canoe classes or one of the two kayak classes that range from amateur to experienced. Prizes of miniature paddles are awarded to first, second, and third place winners in each category.

  •  The staff of Haven Hospice’s Tri-Counties care center in Chiefland honored their most dedicated volunteer, Harry L. Coleman, with a surprise 80th birthday party Mar. 5. It was a fitting tribute to this Chiefland resident who has made helping Haven his mission. For “Mr. Harry,” as he’s known, the Haven staff is his family and the care center is his home. He adopted them and they in turn adopted him.

  • LIVE OAK--Film students at American University in Washington, D.C., exchanged fun in the big city to camp in the wilds of Florida for a week over spring break. Classroom in the Wild – an alternative spring break program – gave about a dozen students an opportunity to explore life on the banks of the Suwannee River while learning to film nature.

    The students camped at Adams tract river camp, owned by the Suwannee River Water Management District (District), March 6-12. During their stay, they toured the Steinhatchee River Basin and other District lands.

  • The famous February 1945, photo of the flag raising at Iwo Jima shows six men planting an American flag. Three died there and three managed to make it back home after World War II. Among the survivors was John “Doc” Bradley, of Antigo, Wis., a corpsman, a medic.

    When Bradley died in 1994, his family recognized that he had never spoken publicly about his involvement in Iwo Jima. Instead, his son James Bradley wrote the book, “Flags of Our Fathers” to tell the story of that moment in a war and how they affected the decades that followed for the survivors.

  • The Levy County Schools Foundation will be holding it's first Cycle for Education on Saturday.

    The bicycle ride will begin at the Chiefland Regional Shopping Center at 102 North Main Street in Chiefland.      SAG stops, with food and beverage available, will be located in Fanning Springs and Old Town until noon.  The ride to Old Town and back to Chiefland is approximately 25 miles.  Riders may ride further if they choose.  

  • Ben Thomas opened the door and pulled out a rifle.

    “Are you familiar with the Henry?” he asked in a stern southern accent.  “They’ve been makin’ them since 1890.”

    The rifle was pointed upward and was stuffed with a bright orange cord, an indication that it was safe for the handling, according to Thomas.

    He made a series of rehearsed movements, illustrating the safest way to place a weapon of this sort into the hands of another.

  • Anyone can enjoy the treats of summer with careful planning and shopping. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) recommends these substitutions to lighten up a traditional cookout.

    Substitute non-fat plain yogurt or non-fat mayonnaise in popular picnic salads.

    Choose lean cuts of meat for grilling. Try ground turkey for burgers or marinated flank steak.

    Pack plenty of fresh vegetables and low fat dips for crunching, air popped popcorn for munching, and a variety of interesting diet drinks for sipping.

  • If you want to take a walk across Florida, like from Pensacola to Key West, plan on having enough shoes for 817 miles or 4,313,760 feet or, in the case of Benny Collins, for 1,734,845 steps.

    Collins is not counting every step he takes in his quest to walk the length of Florida, but he is counting on folks along the way to share an experience, prayer with God, and help Bushnell Assembly of God build a new sanctuary.

  • Are you looking for a flexible volunteer opportunity that enables you to make a real difference in the lives of seniors in your community?  Do you like to help others resolve problems?  If you answered yes to these questions, then the Florida Department of Elder Affairs may have the perfect volunteer position for you!

  • Farm Credit pays homage to rural America with a country rap video. That’s right, a country rap video. Word.

    The video showcases the mad creative skills, courage (one guy attempts a back flip on his motorcycle), and dedication of folks who entered the first-ever “Keepin’ It Rural Video Contest.” Contest co-sponsor Farm Credit of North Florida has awarded cash prizes totaling $6,000.

  • Imagine the roads of the tri-county area. Think about the folks you know. The small towns.

    Set these images to music and you will find them floating through the notes of Easton Corbin’s title song on his new album, “I’m a Little More Country Than That.”

    Those are the roots that run through the album, on the Mercury label,  released on Tuesday.

    For folks in the tri-county area, there can be some pride as Corbin’s roots run deep in the area.

  •    Levy County has a multitude of beautiful, young ladies and now is the time to prove it.  

       The Levy County Fair Association is calling for contestants for the Miss Levy County Fair Queen and Little Miss Levy County Fair Queen pageants to be held April 11 at 6 p.m.

       The Fair Queen pageant is open to all girls 15-18 years of age who reside in and/or attend high school in Levy County.  

       Little Miss pageant is open to all girls ages four to six who reside in and/or attend school in Levy County.   

  • If you were in Cedar Key two weeks ago, you may have noticed a few extra people visiting the island community. That’s because the Florida Lighthouse Association held its meeting in the Island Room at Cedar Cove.

    With more than 130 people in attendance, it was the largest member meeting ever for the 14-year-old non-profit organization run entirely by volunteers who are dedicated to the preservation of the 30 remaining lighthouses along Florida’s 1,200 mile coastline.

  • Marie Meeks said one of the earliest memories of her 100-year life was when her father brought her an old wooden apple crate to stand on so she’d be tall enough to wash dishes.  She was 2.

    “I mostly cooked and washed,” she said.  “My sisters and I we never did work on the farm.”

    Meeks, born in 1910, was one of seven sisters and four brothers to grow up on a small farm in Williston.

    It was a time when people got around by horse and buggies, and Meeks said she walked 3 1/2 miles everyday to get to school.

  • More than 75 people turned out to the opening Saturday night to see the 47 highly-creative entries, including five from exhibit judge Chick Schwartz.  

    Chick is a sculptor who works in bronze, cement, wood, ceramics and found objects. His work has been featured in more than 25 one person shows in galleries and museums across the U.S. and Canada.  

    Chick and his wife Marsha are the artists who conceived and built the fisherman and fish in the CKAC Sculpture Garden.

  • Rhonda Cook’s eyes welled up with tears when she recounted the story of a woman who called her one day at the small radio station she runs out of Long Pond Baptist Church.

    The woman had recently lost a loved one and was calling Cook to praise her for the work she does.

    “The statement she made to me was, ‘ I couldn’t have got through the last two years had it not been for this station,’ ” Cook said.  “And that’s when you know what you’re doing is making a difference.”

  • Andrew Davis said he was about 7 years old when his father first took him out hunting in the furrowed and freshly plowed farmlands of Levy County.  

    Davis said what they sought, though well hidden and making no sound, almost seemed to have the desire of wanting to be found, of wanting to tell a story.

    The stories are those of people that inhabited the land long before the days of fences, highways and acres upon acres of plump, juicy watermelons.  

  • Donna Leggett, an exceptional student education aide at Bronson Middle/High School, was selected as the 2009-2010 School-Related Employee of the Year.

    In her fourth year at Bronson, Leggett has devoted her time to tutoring and assisting some the school's neediest students. She also helps teachers with students that require special accommodations.

    Her patience and understanding does not only apply to academics, either. She also helps students with their emotional well being, providing students with the encouragement they need to perform at their best.

  • Years of dedication to students have paid off for Sherry Beauchamp, a fourth grade teacher at Chiefland Elementary School.

    Beauchamp was was honored by school and district officials on Feb. 5 as she was selected as the Levy County Teacher of the Year.

    She was surprised in Principal Patrice McCully’s office by Levy County Superintendent Robert Hastings, School Board Member Paige Brookins of Chiefland, and selection committee members.