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Features

  • Before last Friday's Chiefland-Trenton High School football game, cheerleaders held a fundraiser to benefit the American Cancer Society's fight against breast cancer. At halftime, the school honored Laura Brookins, a local cancer survivor.

    Also, employees of Chiefland Hardware and Farm Supply stand next to sale items meant to increase awareness of breast cancer.  A percentage of the sale of the "pink" items will go to breast cancer research.  The sale will last through the month of October. 

  • Luke was busy snorting in the dirt and kicking up a huge cloud of sunlit dust when Patricia Zerbini yelled his name to get his attention.  He looked at her, and noticing what she held in her hands, turned and plodded toward her with the same enthusiasm children show when they jump out of bed Christmas morning.
    When he made it to where Zerbini was standing, she handed him a brush loaded with paint.  Luke snorted again and walked over to a specially prepared easel perched in the dirt not far from where a large crowd had gathered.

  • Williston Rotary Club members received the challenge to have purple pinkies Tueday when Lake City Rotarian John Wheeler spoke to the club about eliminating polio around the world.
    Once pandemic, polio is close to being eradicated and Rotary has taken on the project to ensure it is in most of our lifetimes.
    Today, the disease, which affects the nervous system and causes paralysis, originates in four countries: Afghanistan, India, Pakistan and Nigeria.

  • Hart Springs will be featured in a segment of a new TV series on geology put together by the British Broadcasting Corporation and the Discovery Channel.

    Filming for the project at Hart Springs, which focused on part of the spring's cave system, started Wednesday and ended on Friday.

    Lucy Van Beek, a BBC producer at the springs Wednesday, said the TV series, called “Naked Earth”, will be hosted by the BBC's Richard Hammond and will air some time in 2011.

  • It was a day full of events on Saturday, Sept. 4, at the Williston Horseman’s Park. Cross Brand Cowboy Church hosted their first team roping at 10 a.m. It was a three-head progressive put on by John Hudson and his crew. Casey Larkins and Bud Partin rode away with the top prize money. The next team roping will be Saturday, Oct. 2. Sign-up is at 9 a.m., rope at 10 a.m.

  • The fifth annual motorcycle fund-raiser “Ride to Provide,” to benefit Levy Association for Retarded Citizens (Levy ARC), will be held Sept. 11 at 10 a.m.

    On-site registration begins at 7:30 a.m. at Bronson High School with free coffee and doughnuts.

    The ride will begin with kickstands up at 10 a.m. Participants are encouraged to pre-register online at www.ridetoprovide.net.

  •  It’s time to let your voice be heard.

  • Haven’s Fall at the Lodge, a benefit for Haven Hospice will take place from  5:30 – 9:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17, at the Gilchrist Club, a private hunting and sporting club set in the heart of Florida’s timberland, located at 290 SE 4th Way, Trenton. Festivities begin at 5:30 p.m. with live music, along with a live and silent auction.   Reservations and tickets are required. The cost is $75 per guest. For tickets contact Stephanie Brod at 352-271-4665.  

  •  Keyboarding course offered at CCF Levy Center

  • Ask Bronson Volunteer Fire Department Captain Jerry Horton why the program he helped pioneer, the Levy County Fire Academy, is growing in popularity, and he’ll tell you it’s because of the quality of the instructors. “If it wasn’t for the instructors, it wouldn’t be what it is today,” he said Thursday. The program, given its official name this year, has steadily grown since it was started about five years ago and is being looked at by the Florida State Fire College, in Ocala, as a potential partner in providing more advanced t

  • Data collection specialists with the Suwannee River Water Management District spend long hours installing, maintaining and collecting data from gages along our rivers, lakes, and streams, but they can’t do it without the help of a few volunteers that supplement their efforts.  More than 30 volunteer observers help collect  rainfall and water-level data from manual gages within the District’s 15-county region.

  • The Suwannee River Water Management District commends Anderson Columbia Co., Inc., and Strickland Field Limited Partnership for a10-year commitment to water resource protection. The District purchased development rights on a 3,822-acre parcel owned by Anderson Columbia and Strickland Field Limited Partnership for $2.3 million 10 years ago. Under the terms of the conservation easement, landowners of the property have agreed to keep the property in its current natural state. The agreement restricts harvesting or alteration of forested wetlands.

  • Although the effects of the oil spill are decreasing in Florida, the threat to wildlife remains.

  •  Catch and release is a good rule of thumb while fishing. Entice and educate is an even better rule of thumb for young anglers.

  • Another Way, Inc., which operates a shelter and life skills center for victims of domestic violence and rape in Chiefland, has received a grant from Walmart Foundation for $60,000 to support the continuation of its Economic Empowerment Program. The non-profit agency which serves Columbia, Dixie, Gilchrist, Hamilton, Lafayette, Levy and Suwannee counties had been facing an end of funding for the program by another foundation when the Walmart Foundation came through with the grant. Donna Fagan, executive director of Another Way, said the agency serves about 900 to

  • Chris Wilson doesn’t ride bulls anymore.

        “You have to be a special person to ride a bull,” the 37-year-old husband and father of four said over the phone Monday.  “I’ve been stepped on.  I’ve been rammed into the ground.  And I’ve been sat on.”

    The sport of bull riding is a young man’s game, Wilson said.  “ I’ve seen guys get thrown 50 feet into the air.”  He said he has a brother-in-law who is paralyzed from the neck down from bull riding.

  • The Social Security Stories Project is seeking stories from individuals about the importance and impact of Social Security in their lives, with a goal of receiving 1,000 stories by the end of July.

    The submitted stories will be reviewed for possible inclusion in a new book to be published in honor of the 75th anniversary of Social Security on Aug. 14, 2010.

    There are 10 stories featured in a new video that can be viewed on YouTube. The video uses photos submitted by the story tellers, as well as audio captured through a special toll-free number set up for the project.

  • Cedar Key FFA members! If you want to attend the national FFA meeting in Indianapolis, Ind., in October you MUST contact Adviser Dennis Voyles before Aug. 15 to reserve your room. Please call him at 352-339-2034 or email at davoyles@aol.com.

  • Students filed into a classroom last Thursday at Chiefland High School, well aware that they would see some solemn examples of the terrible things that can happen behind the wheel of a vehicle.

    About 15 participants, primarily from Chiefland and a few from Dixie County, were attending a session of the Levy County Teen Driver Improvement Program. The free course shows young drivers the consequences of operating a car while impaired or distracted.

  • Mosquito season is here and we all need to remember a few tips to avoid being bitten.

    The five D’s are:

    n Dusk and Dawn are when mosquitoes are most active so you should avoid being outside at those times. And if you must be outdoors then--

    n Dress so your skin is covered with clothing. Wear shoes, socks, long pants, and a long sleeved shirt.

    n Drain any empty containers and stagnant water so mosquito wrigglers can’t grow up to become biters.