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Features

  • It started out as a visit by deputies to the LARC Center in Otter Creek.

    "We were asked to come out to talk to the clients," Sheriff's Lt. Sean Mullins told the Chiefland Rotary Club on Sept. 17. "I didn't know what to expect."

    He said the officers walked through the door and the adults started clapping.

    One thing he learned that day has stuck with Mullins: "They appreciate everything."

    Then came the idea of how cool it would be to ride bikes out to the center to show the clients.

  • The Cedar Key Historical Society announced that it has been selected to host Museums on Main Street (MoMS), which will be taking place from September through October. Funded in part by the United States Congress, MoMS combines the talents of the Smithsonian Institution, the state humanities councils and local organizations to bring national and local heritage to small communities across the United States.

  • As a scientist, Dr. Ken Sulak is trained to make observations. 

    He makes his living studying the ways of the natural world, with an emphasis, in recent years, on the lives of sturgeon swimming the lengths of the Suwannee River.

    But his professional work over time has bled into his personal interests: observations on the lives of humans and their place in the world.

    "In the course of being on the river, you run into a lot of people, a lot of old timers," Sulak said from his office at the U.S. Geological Survey last week.

  •  Gainesville – Internationally-known quilter Joan Shay will present a trunk show of her creations at the Sept. 4 meeting of Quilters of Alachua County Day Guild (QACDG).

    Employing her signature Appli-Bond™ technique, Joan creates exciting three-dimensional works of fiber art that literally jump off the quilt.

    September’s trunk show is in advance of an all-day workshop with Joan to be held in October.

  • Dr. Brent Stewart was the guest of Rotarian Ben Lott at last week's Suwannee Valley Rotary Club. Stewart, an anesthesiologist, recently opened Advanced Pain Medical Center in Jonesville.

    Stewart spoke on the different types of anesthesia in use today, misconceptions about anesthesia and how anesthesiologists determine how much to administer to patient. Dr. Stewart is pictured with SVRC president Dr. Bob Mount.

  • Julie Davis, left, accepts a thank you from Suwannee Valley Rotary Club President Robert Mount for her talk on services provided by her company Mederi Caretakers. 

    She spoke at the July 17 meeting.

  • Robert Mount, left, the incoming president of the Suwannee Valley Rotary Club, presents, outgoing president Bill Hammond with a plaque of appreciation for his leadership of the club for the 2013-14 year. 

    The presentation was at the club's July 17 meeting.

  • By Melinda Myers

    Picture yourself harvesting a few fresh strawberries for your cereal in the morning or perhaps picking a few apples from your own backyard tree to cook up into a pie.  It is possible, even if you garden on a balcony or small lot. And even if you have plenty of space, you will still appreciate the fun and convenience of reaching out the backdoor and harvesting some homegrown fruit.

  • Haven Hospice is offering a free, grief-support experience for families through the Camp Safe Haven program. The experience will help families understand their feelings of loss and give them an opportunity to heal.

    Camp Safe Haven Family Camp will be held Saturday, Sept. 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Otter Springs Park and Campground, located at 6470 SW 80th Avenue in Trenton.

  • Personnel from the Levy County Sheriff's Office, family members and Sheriff's COPS (Citizens On Patrol) members  honored Tom and Donna Munsell on their retirement from the volunteer group on July 14.

    Tom Munsell was a part of the second volunteer academy taught at LCSO in the early 1990’s.  During his many years of service he donated 2,122 volunteer hours to the citizens of Levy County. 

    Donna Munsell donated an additional 751 volunteer hours. 

  • Summer work begins early in the morning for the Youth Conservation Corps (YCC) students at the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge. Before the sun makes it over the long leaf pines in the forest, the ice is already in the cooler. Equipment for the day’s work is loaded into the truck along with other essentials, but nothing that would attract bats.

  • This rainbow was straddling Levy County from east to west and was visible from Chiefland to Williston on Friday, July 11.

    If you look closely, you might see a fainter double rainbow above the more visible one. Forget the science of why the rainbow formed. Maybe Levy can be our fabled pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

  • The "Pirates of Penzance Jr.," performed by area children as part of our children’s summer theatre program, is coming to the Chief Theater.

  • When she graduated from CHS last year, she earned a spot as co-valedictorian, a rare happening at the school, and she was also chosen as 2013 homecoming queen.

  • The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, in Ocala, is highlighting the life and work of Dr. Gladys Shafran Kashdin in an exhibition that opened Saturday and will close Nov. 2.

  •  Williston

  • Some say it sprang to life more than 900 years ago, gradually pushing its way up through the Levy County muck in a time when, on the European continent, people were still living in the Dark Ages and setting out on what would be the first of many attempts to reconquer the Holy Land.

  • Levy County Supervisor of Elections Tammy Jones, left, is thanked by Chiefland Rotary Club President Stewart Wasson for bringing members up to date on changes in voting procedures and their responsibilities as voters. She addressed the Rotarians on June 18.

    The club meets at noon, Wednesday, at The Gathering Table on North Main Street/U.S. Highway 19.

  • Edna Nute never had children of her own, but the former teacher nurtured the students who passed through her classroom.

  • It's hot and humid and that means the areas springs, which are flush with water from the heavy rains in the past year are bubbling and cool enough for a dip. 

    Here are the places to chill out on these summer days:

    Park hours of operation and admission cost

    *Otter Springs is currently closed for swimming, but hope water levels will allow swimming by July 4th.

    Otter Springs

    8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

    $4/person

    2 and under free

    60 and over $2.50