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Today's Opinions

  • Lynching in Memphis: Part I

    The first paragraph of a story in the March 10, 1892, edition of the Memphis Appeal-Avalanche stated that not since the race riot of 1866 has the community been in such a fever of excitement as it was yesterday.

    The story described the lynching of three black men: Tom Moss, the owner of People’s Grocery and two clerks, Calvin McDowell and Will Stewart. The store was located in a mixed-race neighborhood known as the Curve. A white grocer named William Barrett was apparently losing business to the nearby People’s Grocery. One narrative tells of rumors and trumped up charges sending a large group of armed white men into the store. Gunshots were traded and several white men were injured. An accounting of events by Damon Mitchell stated a racially charged mob grew out of a fight between a black and a white youth near People’s Grocery.

    A story dated March 10, 1892, in the New York Times stated, “today showed a decided reaction from the excitement into which the city was thrown yesterday by the lynching of the three negro rioters Tom Moss, Will Stewart and Calvin McDowell …”

  • Ask yourself every day: Am I a friend?

    President Franklin Delano Roosevelt felt that the future peace of the world would depend upon relations between the United States and Russia and devoted much thought to the planning of a United Nations, in which, he hoped, international difficulties could be settled, according to White House.gov

    As the war drew to a close, Roosevelt’s health deteriorated, he died April 12, 1945, while at Warm Springs, Georgia, he died of a cerebral hemorrhage.

    When President Roosevelt delivered his historic fourth and final state of the union address Jan. 20, 1945, in a United States that was much more homogeneous than it is now. The 1940 census showed the U.S. population was 132.2 million; 89.8 percent were white and 9.8 percent were minorities. So, when he delivered his final address, he was speaking almost exclusively to white people.

    He said, “Mr. Chief Justice, Mr. Vice president, my friends, you will understand and, I believe, agree with my wish that the form of this inauguration be simple and its words brief.

  • Springs science and advocacy

    By Bob Knight

    The Florida Springs Institute commends the efforts of the dozens of University of Florida research faculty and students who just completed a three-year study of Silver Springs and the Silver River. Tens of thousands of hours were spent on and under the cold spring water collecting information, and on computers analyzing the data and writing the 1,085-page final study report. After three years and roughly $3 million in state funding, UF has once again concluded that Silver Springs is experiencing excessive flow reductions and nitrate pollution.

  • The best present I ever bought my wife

    I struggled this last year to figure out what to get my wife for Christmas this year. I’m a good gift-giver and I started trying to look around in October. My birthday is in October so I’m usually thinking about gifts then.

    She didn’t drop any hints. If she did, I wasn’t listening until finally, I just came out and asked, “What do you want for Christmas?”

    “I want an Alexa,” she said.

    “I thought you said they were a waste of money and that you didn’t want one,” I queried.

    “I didn’t, but my sisters have one and they keep telling me how much fun they are having and all the things it will do,” she replied.

    I have to remember to thank her sisters for putting an Amazon Echo in her mind because it is absolutely the best gift I ever got her for myself.

  • Dear Mr. Denier, I believe in climate change

    Dear Mr. C. C. Denier:

    I know, I know, I know. Everybody used to always talk about “global warming” and then one fine morning we all woke up and everyone was saying “climate change.” It was all over the TV and radio news and talk shows, the internet and in print.

    But, I have to tell you Mr. Denier, this is my second full winter in Florida and 2018 is much, much colder than 2017.

    According to Weather Underground, the average mean temperature from Dec. 1, 2016, to Jan. 19, 2017, was 63 degrees. The average low was 38 degrees and the average high was 75 degrees. During the same period from December 2017 to Jan. 19, the average mean temperature was 56 degrees, the average low, 38 is the same; but the average high is 70 — five degrees cooler.

  • Picking trash in Levy County — immortal trash

    By Ed Emrich

    I hate trash. I really do! I notice how people discard items out of their vehicle windows or how they allow trash to blow out the beds of their trucks. Take a look around during dear hunting season and you will see an increase of empty plastic deer corm, dog food and ice bags along the roadside. Are some hunters unconcerned because they believe that the plastic bags will be picked up by road crews or picked up by concerned citizens who work to keep the Nature Coast natural. Maybe "Litter Bugs" believe that the plastic will eventually dissolve into the landscape and disappear. So what is the life expectancy of plastic trash? How long does it take for plastic to deteriorate and disappear into the landscape? According to my research, the short answer is NEVER! Plastic trash is in fact IMMORTAL!

  • Jalen Hurts showed us his true character

    Today, Jalen Hurts will not get the ESPN coverage. His image will not be plastered over Sports Center and other news programming. People will not be inundated with his heroic performance of throwing a perfect back-shoulder pass or some long beast mode type run to win the game.

    No. Those accolades will go to someone else- and deservingly so. However, in an age of “me, me” and “I have to get mine,” Jalen Hurt’s response to being pulled at the half of the national championship game will go highly unnoticed.

    Only a year removed from nearly pulling off one of the greatest plays in history for a true freshman quarterback until another great player and Heisman Trophy finalist quarterback upstaged him in defeat; he was devastated once again by being benched.

    While he clearly wanted to be in the game on that final drive evidenced by him visibly shaking on the sideline as adrenaline flowed; he stood there, cheered for his teammate, and once hugged the guy who had taken his place.

    After the game, he was all smiles and displayed genuine happiness for he and his teammates.

  • I don't know what to call this one: sports?

    If you look to the left, you’ll notice a column by Dr. Kendrick Scott. I’ve been pestering him off and on to write a regular column for the Citizen since last February when I heard him speak at the annual Levy County Black History Program.

    There are reasons I wanted him. First, he’s smart and well spoken. Second, I really want the paper to represent all of Chiefland and not a bunch of old white men like myself. I don’t know yet how often he will contribute, but I hope it’s often because he’s already made me think about how I view sports on television.

    I never played sports too much. Oh, I rode in the annual donkey basketball game and sometimes followed behind the donkeys with a shovel. And, I was a four-year substitute on the high school basketball team. I never got to play many regular minutes and when I did, I only further solidified my role as the 10th Man. The last time I looked, I could still see the imprint of my butt on the far end of the bench where I sat from 1965 to 1969.