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Today's Opinions

  • Hay and Ink

    Hay and Ink

    When I arrive home from the newspaper office, my wife Sharon occasionally tells me that I smell like ink.

    This is not a bad thing. It's just a fact resulting from my close proximity to the giant press that cranks out tens of thousands of newspapers each week. About five thousand of those weekly newspapers are copies of the Chiefland Citizen.

    The fragrance of ink permeates the building where I work and it follows me home every now and then. This odor serves as a reminder from being part of the local press corps.

  • Cervone needs to make a decision

    Will he or won't he? That's the buzz around Chiefland, as Eighth Judicial Circuit State Attorney Bill Cervone continues weighing evidence of alleged voter fraud cases brought to light in August after the city election.

    On Sept. 27, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement handed Cervone the evidence it collected after a five-week investigation.

    Two months later, the attorney is still sitting on his hands. He is drawing out a process that has left lives in chaos and seems in no hurry to bring the issue to a conclusion once and for all.

  • Where have all the traditions gone?

    It's becoming more apparent that soon I will be the last hold-out for sentimentality and tradition.

    Starting with Thanksgiving dinner.

    Dressing, to go with the turkey, is a necessity–whether you like it or not.

    Ditto the pumpkin pie.

    I had neither last week.

    I was part of a group of people who decided a potluck dinner was the easiest solution.

    Neither dressing nor pie was my responsibility.

    I wish it had been.

    It didn't feel like Thanksgiving without the two things that evoke childhood memories and make me all warm and fuzzy inside.

  • There's truth in the old hymns

    I like to shower. I enjoy clean clothes. I have to have my coffee in the morning–and night–lots of it.

    But those things take water. Daily.

    And for months now I have sympathized with my North Georgia friends who are suffering through the worst drought in 100 years.

    Lakes Hartwell and Lanier are mud puddles. Docks are useless and more importantly good potable water is a rare commodity for tens of thousands of people.

  • Handshakes

    As editor of the Glades County Democrat in the late 1980s, I convinced then-publisher Richard Hitt to buy a modem so that I could transmit stories from Moore Haven to Clewiston.

    My friend Jeff Roslow was the editor of the Clewiston News and we served readers in Glades and Hendry counties. Internet service did not exist then in Moore Haven or Clewiston.

    I transmitted stories via modem from my IBM home computer in Moore Haven to the Macintosh computer at the Clewiston office.

  • Thank you to our real heroes

    On Nov. 11, America will celebrate the greatest heroes of our time-this nation's veterans. These men and women sacrificed of themselves, dedicating their efforts to the cause we call Freedom.

    Freedom always comes with a price and for many of these servicemen and women, the price was often supreme.

    From the Argonne Forest to the sands of Iwo Jima; from Pork Chop Hill in Korea to Hamburger Hill in Vietnam; and back across the waters to the Persian Gulf and now in Iraq, lives were lost, dreams were shattered and still they willingly gave.

  • Good things come to those who wait

    For almost a year the Chiefland Citizen has been in the beginning stages of creating a more reader-friendly, informative website.

    At long last, after trials, mistakes, crashed computers and a few missed deadlines, this week we go live with what can be best described as a work in progress.

    Online readers will still find us at www.chieflandcitizen.com.

    We haven't moved, but our accommodations are more modern, more detailed, more in-depth than what you're used to seeing when you log on.

  • Why press your luck?

    The Chiefland Citizen is very generous to its employees.

    This year the company offered to not only pay for flu shots for the staff, but even had a nurse come on site to administer the vaccine in the middle of the workday so there could be no excuses about inability to get one.

    The sign up sheet was posted for over a month and daily I watched name after name queue on it.

    Mine was not added and a couple co-workers asked why I hadn't signed up.

    I met their inquiries with a shrug and a quick change of subject and moved on.