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Editorials

  • Editorial toon for September 22
  • OUR VIEW: Good things

    “This is a good thing,” is a trademark phrase for homekeeping doyenne Martha Stewart.
    And whether or not you like her, the statement is as good an assessment for what is happening in Chiefland this year, especially of late.
    Construction has finished on a new Ralph's Burgers, next to the (once shut down) Sunoco station on North Young Boulevard.
    Murphy USA has opened an always busy gas station right in the busiest place in town — home to Winn Dixie and Walmart.

  • Our View: Data miners have ally in Florida DMV

    When you apply for a license to drive in the state, you are required to provide the Department of Motor Vehicles a lot of personal information, such as your Social Security number, your address and date of birth. This is information reasonably required by the state in order to license drivers.

  • OUR VIEW: Closing the blinds in the sunshine

    All political power is inherent in the people.
    Article I, Section 1, Florida State Constitution

    All meetings of any collegial public body of the executive branch of state government or of any collegial public body of a county, municipality, school district, or special district, at which official acts are to be taken or at which public business of such body is to be transacted or discussed, shall be open and noticed to the public...
    Article I, Section 24 (b), Florida State Constitution

  • OUR VIEW: Commissioners want to get their message out

    It's long been handy for politicians to say the news media distorts and spins its reporting on them.
    So the Chiefland Citizen is taking them up on the challenge.
    In Monday's Board of County Commissioners budget workshop the four members were told they could submit columns on this year's vexing budget problems — including the possibility of higher assessments, higher property taxes, furloughs or cuts in hours for county workers or cuts in hours and services.
    These are all worthy topics for debate.

  • OUR VIEW: Personal agendas? Or betterment of county?

      Despite a relatively new Board of County Commissioners and promises to do away with the "old way" of doing things, it appears to be politics as usual in Levy County.

  • OUR VIEW:Let’s end crazy quilt of districts

    THE ISSUE:
    Florida redistricting to begin.
    OUR OPINION:
    Keep politics out of it.

    The Florida House and Senate redistricting committees on Monday begin hosting the first round of joint public meetings. The Florida Legislature redraws state and congressional districts every 10 years following the publication of the U.S. Census.
    Members of the public will have several opportunities to make their vision for redistricting known to committee members.

  • OUR VIEW: Buy the lights

    It was August 2009 when the city closed the door on the idea of purchasing Christmas lights.
    Vice Mayor Teresa Barron had suggested the city consider buying lights rather than renting. She did a little research and found the manufacturer that supplied the rental company would sell the fixtures that adorn poles along U.S. Highways 27A and 19 for $14,000 with a three-year warranty.
    Barron dreamed big, suggesting the city could buy fixtures for 100 light poles for $23,000.
    The city fathers fretted.

  • Our View: Worthy cause

    Kudos Chiefland City Commissioners.
    Bet they never imagined they'd see that in this space, but it's certainly warranted after commissioners went to bat for one of the best programs in the city.
    Commissioners voted unanimously to waive a $180 rental fee normally charged for use of the Tommy Usher Pineland Center for the College of Central Florida Levy Center to have its GED graduation.
    We think that was a brilliant move and hope the commissioners will waive the fee every time there's a GED graduation until the CF Levy Center builds its campus.

  • OUR VIEW: No mulligan this time .... try voting again

     Chiefland Fire Chief James Harris’ name was on the tip of more than a few tongues last week after the news that after a year on the job his paycheck is growing by more than 20 percent.