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Columns

  • Reflections on Christmas wishes

    I wish I had money to buy gifts for all the people who touch my life in the course of a year.

    But if I did, you would be calling me Oprah instead of Carolyn, because those people are legion.

    Each year I write a Christmas letter to the family and friends I communicate with less than I should and this year as I thought of a summation, I knew what it had to be:

    "Except for a few minor things, I am very, very happy."

    And when I think about those minor things that trouble me, I realize how blessed I am.

  • Lack of time won't defeat me

    It's no secret . . . I love Christmas. From crowded stores to decorations to kitchens redolent with the aromas of cinnamon and vanilla, it's all good to me.

    Every year since I can remember, I've always vowed to get an earlier start, plan better, stretch out the chores and actually enjoy the holiday I love so much.

    It's only a few days into December and I can already tell I am going to fail miserably at my goals.

  • Hay and Ink

    Hay and Ink

    When I arrive home from the newspaper office, my wife Sharon occasionally tells me that I smell like ink.

    This is not a bad thing. It's just a fact resulting from my close proximity to the giant press that cranks out tens of thousands of newspapers each week. About five thousand of those weekly newspapers are copies of the Chiefland Citizen.

    The fragrance of ink permeates the building where I work and it follows me home every now and then. This odor serves as a reminder from being part of the local press corps.

  • Where have all the traditions gone?

    It's becoming more apparent that soon I will be the last hold-out for sentimentality and tradition.

    Starting with Thanksgiving dinner.

    Dressing, to go with the turkey, is a necessity–whether you like it or not.

    Ditto the pumpkin pie.

    I had neither last week.

    I was part of a group of people who decided a potluck dinner was the easiest solution.

    Neither dressing nor pie was my responsibility.

    I wish it had been.

    It didn't feel like Thanksgiving without the two things that evoke childhood memories and make me all warm and fuzzy inside.

  • Why press your luck?

    The Chiefland Citizen is very generous to its employees.

    This year the company offered to not only pay for flu shots for the staff, but even had a nurse come on site to administer the vaccine in the middle of the workday so there could be no excuses about inability to get one.

    The sign up sheet was posted for over a month and daily I watched name after name queue on it.

    Mine was not added and a couple co-workers asked why I hadn't signed up.

    I met their inquiries with a shrug and a quick change of subject and moved on.

  • Invisibility

    I recently backed my 2006 Jeep Liberty into a Mitsubishi.

    The little car was so close to my vehicle?s rear bumper that I did not see it when I looked in the rear or side view mirrors. From my perspective, it was invisible. I remind readers to look very, very carefully before backing up.

    Now I will address other issues relevant to invisibility.

    I went to a three-day United Methodist Men?s retreat in Leesburg from Oct. 19 through 21. There were 359 visible attendees from 44 churches, including the five men from First United Methodist Church of Chiefland.