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Today's News

  • City to post public property

    The Chiefland City Commission held three meetings Monday evening as the Board of Commissioners, Planning Commission and Board of Adjustment.

    The Board of Commissioners approved the first reading of Ordinance 17-06 that would clearly state the closing hours of city-owned property. Commissioner Teresa Barron wanted to make it clear that persons in violation of the ordinance cannot be arrested on the first offense for trespassing. However, the ordinance does give the police probable cause to stop and question anyone on the property during the posted closing time.

    CPD Chief Scott Anderson said, “If they are on city property (during posted hours), then my officers can have probable cause to approach someone and go from there.”

    He said the department can take care of the state-owned walking trail by patrol, and they patrol the schools after hours when no one is expected to be on school property.

  • Free speech under attack in America

    I am writing this article the evening before Mr. Richard Spencer is scheduled to address an audience at the Phillips Center on the U of F Campus in Gainesville. He is billed as a white nationalist according to virtually all local mass media sources. 

    Personally, I do not support any organization where race is a prerequisite to membership. Therefore, I do not support Mr. Spencer’s National Policy Institute. Wait a minute, where is the race element in the title NPI? According to Wikipedia, ‘’the National Policy Institute is a white supremacist think tank based in Alexandria Virginia.” If Mr. Spencer is a white supremacist I will have nothing to do with him as I don’t and will not have anything to do with any race based groups, but I am uncomfortable with the double standard that is becoming very common in today’s society. Can you imagine if someone organized a Gainesville White Professionals organization? 

  • Don’t talk politics!

    Have your parents, or has someone important to you, advised you “Don’t talk politics!?” It’s one of those heated topics where most everyone has his or her own opinion, and may see talking politics as a threat, or fuel for a likely argument. But what’s the downside of keeping quiet about your own political opinions? We’re already headed towards being a more and more divided country, with today’s problems and challenges, and with all the diversity this “melting-pot” nation presents us with. So it may feel natural to hold back on your ideas or opinions, to avoid controversy, or to avoid taking sides and further dividing the nation. And we’re supposed to be a nation “by the people, and for all the people.” If we avoid discussing opposing ideas, we are likely to become less tolerant of other points of view. To be a true democracy, shouldn’t we listen to all points of view, consider them thoughtfully, and make intelligent, informed decisions? When we stop communicating well, we can’t make truly informed or wise decisions.

  • Was it a UFO or an Air Force refueling operation?

    Between 1952 and 1969, the U.S. Air Force conducted a study of UFO sightings known as “Project Blue Book.”

    Project Blue Book goals were to scientifically analyze UFO data and to determine if UFOs were a national security threat. In those 17 years, more than 12,000 reported UFO sightings were analyzed. Most of the “UFOs” were explained away as known aircraft or naturally occurring phenomenon.

    The project ended in 1969, when it was concluded there was nothing anomalous or dangerous about the reported UFOs and that there was no evidence that any of the UFOs were in fact extraterrestrial, according to the history website Fold3.com.

    One sighting was reported on a late Sunday night at about 10 p.m. Oct. 30, 1955, in Williston by a police officer whose name was redacted from the report. The officer was 40 years old and had attained a fifth-grade education.

    The report noted the “Source gave much thought to each question and asked and seems fairly sure of his answers. In the opinion of the investigator, source was fairly reliable.”

  • Beast Feast raises funds for Levy County Schools Foundation

    Saturday was a spectacular evening for the Levy County Schools Foundation complete with a gorgeous sunset, temperatures in the 70s, a cool breeze and almost zero humidity, the weather could not have been more perfect.

    That was the setting for the school foundation’s 8th Annual Beast Feast in Williston. Etheridge Produce donated the use of their facility and V.E. Whitehurst and Sons Inc., supplied the lighting for the parking lots. With so many people in Levy County coming together to support the foundation, this year’s feast saw the largest gifts of donations. With over 300 people in attendance, the event netted $19,673, up $4,025 from $15,648 in 2016.

    The foundation stages fundraisers throughout the year with the Stars Gala in February, Evening of Excellence in the Spring, Stuff the Bus each August and the Beast Feast in the fall. Classroom grants, grants for great ideas and the Student Scholarship Program are funded through the Foundation and its supporters.

  • CES students pick their favorite biomes

    The second-grade classes at Chiefland Elementary School completed a week-long study on the desert and rain forest. Students had the option for an extra credit project of a diorama of the rain forest or a desert. They also wrote an opinion paper on which place they would like to visit and why based on the books read and videos watched during the week.

  • CES students learn about forestry

    Usher Land and Timber, along with the Florida Forestry Service, sent three foresters to speak to fourth graders about Forestry Week. The students learned the importance of trees and their many uses. The foresters were Joe McKenzie Sr., Florida Forestry Service; Sean Gilbert, UF intern; and Eric Handley, forester, both with Usher Land and Timber.

  • Tommy Usher Log A Load For Kids surpasses $1 million

    The organizers behind the Tommy Usher Log A Load for Kids Golf Classic celebrated a landmark achievement for the annual charity event Oct. 20.

    In its 23rd year, the Classic, which generates proceeds for the UF Health Shands Children’s Hospital, surpassed $1 million in funds raised.

    It’s held at the Chiefland Golf and Country Club.

    The Log A Load For Kids fundraising campaign partners loggers and other members of the forest industry to raise money for local Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals. The network has raised more than $48 million dollars in nearly three decades.

    The Chiefland version is named after the late Tommy Usher, brother of Lynetta Usher Griner. Griner has been the leading organizer of the Tommy Usher Log A Load Golf Classic for all 23 years. Usher was the youngest member of the Florida Forestry Association when he passed in 1989.

    The Chiefland Classic needed around $20,000 to surpass its magic number, and collected more than $54,000.

  • Beck wins tiebreaker in Ladies Division at Rye Grass

    The 40th Annual Rye Grass Invitational Tournament held its ladies round Oct. 13 and Oct. 14, and added a Ladies Scramble for the first time in its history on the morning of the opening day (Oct. 12) at the Chiefland Golf and Country Club.

    Eighteen ladies participated and competed well in the first-time scramble. The lowest grossing team turned in a four-over-par 76, while the lowest net group fired a 67.

    The ladies division played its first round of the tournament the next day, with similarly competitive results, as they battled the humidity and gusty winds.

    Betty Beck and Terry Harris each shot a two-day low of 142, with Beck claiming the win on a tiebreaker; the decisive hole was Beck’s par on No. 17.

    Donna Schaffer narrowly trailed the pair with a 143 to finish third.
     

  • County looks to extend moratorium on marijuana dispensaries

    The Levy Board of County Commissioners is seeking to extend its moratorium on marijuana dispensaries until April.

    But first it must hold a couple of public hearings in November before the new ordinance can pass.

    Commissioner Lilly Rooks casted a dissenting vote at the commission meeting Oct. 17 to guarantee one of those hearings – Nov. 7 – will take place at 5:01 p.m., while the other will come on Nov. 21, coinciding with the regular commission meeting, which starts at 9 a.m.

    A majority-plus-one margin was required to hold both hearings during regular hours (before 5 p.m.). With Commission Mike Joyner absent from the meeting, a 4-0 vote was required.

    “I think it’s fair to the public, so they know what we’re trying to do, that we have it after 5,” Rooks said.

    In addition to the public hearings, the Planning Commission must approve the extended moratorium at its meeting on Nov. 6.

    The Commission tabled a related agenda item requesting direction on the issue for County Attorney Ann Bast Brown, rescheduling it for the meeting on Nov. 21.