Today's News

  • UF forestry has wide impact on industry, natural resources

    The UF/IFAS School of Forest Resources and Conservation (SFRC) boasts a wide scope of research and services, touching on everything from the hit film Finding Dory, to converting pine chemicals into jet fuel, to working with cutting edge industry applications for drones and electronic mapping.

    The new SFRC director, Dr. “Red” Baker,” paid a visit to the Suwannee Valley Rotary Club in Chiefland just before Christmas to discuss the program’s unique accomplishments and its current projects that continue to shape the future of the industries of forestry and natural resources.

    Baker, who has served in role for nine months, outlined the three main units of the SFRC, which includes its oldest part, the forestry division, as well as the fisheries and aquatic sciences program, a major part of which is operated in Cedar Key, and, thirdly, the geomatics unit. The latter includes remote sensing, satellite imaging, surveying and mapping and drones.

  • Levy County burglary suspect killed at Dunnellon home

    By Julie Gorham
    For the Citizen

    A burglary suspect from Levy County died from gunshot wounds Wednesday after an altercation with family members at a Dunnellon-area home.

    According to the Citrus County Sheriff’s Office, deputies were responding to a burglary in process at 4:31 p.m. Wednesday on West Dunklin Street when a male suspect, later identified as Zechariah Tackett, 28, of Levy County, was shot.
    When deputies arrived, they found Tackett lying on his back outside of the residence, and two males identified as Robert Jones Sr., 54, and Robert Jones Jr., 32, both of Citrus County, standing in the driveway.

    Deputies performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation on Tackett, but he was unresponsive and pronounced dead at 4:51 p.m, the report states.

    Major crimes detectives interviewed Robert Jones Sr., who said after receiving a call from his sister about a possible burglary, he and his son — both carrying weapons — responded to the home and found an unknown male in the living room. He said Tackett was shot during that confrontation, the report states.

  • Jalen Hurts showed us his true character

    Today, Jalen Hurts will not get the ESPN coverage. His image will not be plastered over Sports Center and other news programming. People will not be inundated with his heroic performance of throwing a perfect back-shoulder pass or some long beast mode type run to win the game.

    No. Those accolades will go to someone else- and deservingly so. However, in an age of “me, me” and “I have to get mine,” Jalen Hurt’s response to being pulled at the half of the national championship game will go highly unnoticed.

    Only a year removed from nearly pulling off one of the greatest plays in history for a true freshman quarterback until another great player and Heisman Trophy finalist quarterback upstaged him in defeat; he was devastated once again by being benched.

    While he clearly wanted to be in the game on that final drive evidenced by him visibly shaking on the sideline as adrenaline flowed; he stood there, cheered for his teammate, and once hugged the guy who had taken his place.

    After the game, he was all smiles and displayed genuine happiness for he and his teammates.

  • I don't know what to call this one: sports?

    If you look to the left, you’ll notice a column by Dr. Kendrick Scott. I’ve been pestering him off and on to write a regular column for the Citizen since last February when I heard him speak at the annual Levy County Black History Program.

    There are reasons I wanted him. First, he’s smart and well spoken. Second, I really want the paper to represent all of Chiefland and not a bunch of old white men like myself. I don’t know yet how often he will contribute, but I hope it’s often because he’s already made me think about how I view sports on television.

    I never played sports too much. Oh, I rode in the annual donkey basketball game and sometimes followed behind the donkeys with a shovel. And, I was a four-year substitute on the high school basketball team. I never got to play many regular minutes and when I did, I only further solidified my role as the 10th Man. The last time I looked, I could still see the imprint of my butt on the far end of the bench where I sat from 1965 to 1969.

  • State considers playoff changes for high school football

    The Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA) will decide on a couple of proposals that, if in place, would have put the Chiefland football team in the playoffs for the first time since 2004 this past season.

    The FHSAA’s Athletic Director Advisory Committee (ADAC) endorsed a Football Advisory Committee proposal at its meeting Jan. 10 in Gainesville to add two more playoff teams from each region in Classes 1A through 4A. They also endorsed a recommendation to add five more points for losses under the playoff points qualifying system.

    Under the current system, four teams from each region make the playoffs in Classes 1A through 4A, making for a total of 16 playoff teams from each of the smaller classifications. The new proposal, if approved, would create 24 playoff teams, and grant a bye for the top two seeded teams from each region, adding an extra round to the playoffs.

    The FHSAA will vote on the changes Jan. 29, and they would be applied for the upcoming 2018 season.

  • Brodus’ 27 points against Bucs help propel CMHS to back-to-back district wins

    Sometimes a basketball team can do 90 percent of its job, but if it fails to finish at the basket, it’s left with nothing to show for all the hard work.

    The Chiefland boys’ basketball team is still a young squad trying to figure things out. And when the shots aren’t falling, the mishaps get magnified.

    Making the shots, however, can fix a lot, as seen by the boost that Quay Brodus provided his Chiefland team Jan. 12 against Branford.

    Brodus, who recently became eligible after transferring schools, tacked on 11 points in the fourth quarter to finish with 27, helping the Indians pull away for a 74-56 district win.

    The victory gave Chiefland its first back-to-back wins on the season, a much-needed lift for the team as it heads toward the district tournament next month. CMHS coach Adam Boyd says the team's three-game stretch, which started against Bell and continued against Bronson Jan. 11, represents the best sustained effort by the team all season.

  • Chiefland comes back in Bronson

    The Chiefland boys’ basketball team came alive from 3-point range to wipe away a double-digit deficit in the second half in Bronson.

    Four different Indians connected from beyond the arc in the third to help the squad to 25 points in the quarter, before Jarrett Jerrels’ nine-point fourth quarter helped Chiefland secure a 70-68 win in district and intra-county action Jan. 11.

    While Jerrels and Jalen Rutledge led CMHS with 13 points apiece, seven Indians notched at least five points apiece in the win, which marked the team’s second victory in District 1A-7 play.

    The comeback win followed what head coach Adam Boyd saw as an encouraging effort in defeat against district powerhouse Bell the previous Friday. It was an especially welcome payoff for a young, sophomore-led squad that has shown impressive effort throughout games as it works to iron out the details of its offense and signature press defense while striving for more consistency.

  • New worlds for sale

    Friends of the Luther Callaway Public Library is having a book sale Saturday, Feb. 3, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Octagon Building behind Chiefland Fire Rescue. Hardback covers are priced to sell at 50 cents each and paperbacks for a quarter.

    Some of the thousands of titles are library books that have not been checked out for a while, but most are donations. They will be organized on tables in categories of fiction and nonfiction.

    Books are always on sale inside the library, but Friends President Ann Brown said Thursday, Jan. 11, during the organization’s monthly meeting that the nonprofit organization is having the book sale to raise money to replace the carpet in the building. Instead of laying carpet rolls, they want carpet squares that will be cheaper in the long run though the upfront cost is about $10,000. Although the library is part of the county system and the building is owned by the city of Chiefland, the friends group helps support programs and other needs not funded through the county system or by the city.

  • Anderson: phone system is going to break

    Chiefland fire and police chiefs made their presentations to the city commission at the regular meeting Jan. 8. Chief James Harris said Chiefland Fire Rescue responded to 1,672 incidents in 2017 while Chief Scott Anderson warned the governing body that the phone system is about to crash.

    Harris said 827 responses were inside the city and 681 were in the county. CFR responded to 78 incidents where other agencies did not respond. CFR went to Bronson on 12 occasions and on three of those trips, CFR was the only agency to respond; Fowlers Bluff did not respond 26 times. CFR aided Fanning Springs 23 times, but Fanning Springs did not respond 36 times. CFR had 35 calls in Otter Creek and aided Rosewood four times, but Rosewood did not respond on five occasions; aided Trenton twice and Cedar Key four times.

  • Bronson celebrates Martin Luther King Jr. Day

    MLK Day in Bronson was a day filled of fun and games. Participants in the egg race (Page 4A) made their way down Main Street in Bronson with their heads up. The street was closed to traffic and vendors set up tables up and down the street. Free hot dogs and sodas were in abundance along with various other food delicacies.