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Today's News

  • Channel, Drew lecture on climate change

    Retired Dr. James E. T. Channel, U.F. Department of Geological Sciences and UF/IFAS Levy County Extension Agent Anthony Drew gave a  climate change presentation to 47 people Sept. 22 at the Levy Levy County Agricultural Extension Service office in Bronson.

    Channel presented the facts of climate change that are supported by documented geological evidence. The potential impact on agriculture and horticulture, in general, was discussed.

    Levy County Extension Agent Anthony Drew asked the audience how many have planted dogwood trees recently and how were those trees doing?

    The overwhelming response seemed to be that the trees are not doing well.

    According to Drew, the warmer temperatures in the atmosphere are to blame. It seems the trees are falling victim to global warming.

    Drew gave examples of what he called “anomalies” being witnessed in the plant kingdom. He then went on to introduce Dr. James E. Channell, his friend of several years.

    They met at a dinner party, and while the wives discussed tile colors the men started talking about their careers.

  • Florida’s dwindling water supply needs conservation, regulatory reform

    Florida is facing a water supply crisis. Large portions of the state are deemed “Water Resource Caution Areas” (WRCAs). The Legislature has directed the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and regional Water Management Districts to identify “alternative water supply” sources, including reclaimed and reused water and even expensive desalinized seawater.

    How did Florida arrive at this critical point? The answer lies partly in the fact that water has always been thought of as plentiful, and free for the taking. We have a culture – and a regulatory system – that encourages permitting groundwater withdrawals for virtually any use from golf course irrigation to cattle ranching to subdivision development.

    Public water supply and agriculture are by far the largest water users statewide, according to DEP’s 2016 annual water supply planning report. With over 1,000 people a day moving to Florida, DEP expects public water consumption to reach 3 billion gallons per day (bgd) by 2035, while agricultural use will increase to 2.8 bgd.

  • Homeowners beware of bad contractors

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, people are scrambling to rebuild their lives and homes.

    Unfortunately, bad actors can take advantage of honest folks during these moments of stress, when everyone is eager to get their lives back in order. There are resources available that can help homeowners avoid being taken advantage of during this challenging time.

  • Love is all we need

    Too many tragedies, too recently. So many innocent victims. There is panic, but there is also courage, and heroism, and kindness that come out in tragic times and events.

    Maybe more than ever, this is the time to come together because of our humanity, empathy, concern for our fellow man, and to reach out in love, prayer, and good will for all. It’s what we’re made of.

    Let’s choose to believe that good always, and eventually, wins out over all the negativity in the world.

    Today, and every day, be kind to others. Reach out with a kind word and a smile.

    Resolve whatever may keep us separated from each other, and let’s be the wonderful people we are created to be.

    Help someone less fortunate than you.

    Be there for those who can use support and encouragement.

    Are you interested in a ground roots movement for bringing in a little more light and a little more love to your community, and to your world?

    Call or email me with your ideas, suggestions, or support for a meeting of minds.

  • What makes good people do bad things?

    I knew this kid growing up. He was a good kid, quiet, friendly. I liked him. I liked his sister better. I never knew of Sonny doing anything truly bad, just kid stuff, teenager stuff, stuff that I hope he grew out of.

    He and his sister were raised by their father, Shorty, a single parent, who mowed yards and probably collected welfare for a living. I grew up in a very small, rural town. It was in an agricultural area and once a retail hub where farmers and their families shopped. Then came WWII and it seemed like most people moved to Dallas to go to work. The town was dying, but it never seemed to take its last breath. So, most of the people I knew were on government assistance in one form or another.

  • Holiday Food Boxes

    One Way Church of Chiefland is creating Holiday Food Boxes for needy families. Holiday Food donation boxes located at The Gathering Table, 116 N. Main St.; The Print Shop, 224 N. Main St.; and Dollar General, 1310 N. Young Blvd. In Trenton, boxes are located at Dollar General, 702 N. Main St.; and Ayers Health and Rehabilitation Center, 606 N. Seventh St. Place nonperishable food items at any one of these locations and be a part of blessing a needy family this holiday.

  • Railroads and Riverboats are on display at Levy County libraries

    An excursion into the Golden Age of Transportation awaits patrons of the Levy County Public Libraries.

    For the next six months, each of the local libraries will have a display of photographs of the railroads and riverboats that plied the waters of the Suwannee River and surrounding waters.

    Steam navigation started on the Suwannee during the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-1842) when the vessels were utilized to carry U.S. soldiers to the interior of Florida and bring the captured Seminoles Indians out to the coast for transport west. Commercial navigation ended when the City of Hawkinsville was abandoned by her last Captain, Mr. Currie, on May 19, 1922.

    Today the vessel rests in shallow water on the west bank of the Suwannee River above Old Town.

    Another well known vessel of Suwannee River fame was the Madison, owned and operated by Capt. James Tucker. Not only did the vessel gain recognition providing the residents of the Suwannee River with much needed supplies, but also served under the Confederacy during the Civil War transporting troops and food stuffs and protecting the river.

  • Former world-class sprinter coming to Chiefland

    The Suwannee Valley Rotary Club is hosting former world-class sprinter and motivational speaker Almon Gunter for a special program scheduled for noon Oct. 26 at the Haven Hospice Community Center. Gunter will share how he is working with Chiefland Middle/High School to build Indian Pride. Gunter uses his experiences and success on the track to help others reach their maximum velocity performance in the game of life. The cost is $10 per person, including lunch catered by Beef O’Brady’s.

    Almon Gunter is CEO and president of Almon Gunter Motivates Inc. He is a highly acclaimed motivational, inspirational public speaker, author, and consultant, as well as a former world-class sprinter in track. He is the author of three books: “Focus on the Final Seconds and Win the Game of Life,” a how-to book on achieving both mental and physical fitness success in life; “Focus To Win” analyzes personal traits needed to build a strong foundation for success and “The Essence of Teamwork” outlines the eight principles of a winning team. 

  • Bank teller arrested for grand theft

    Rachel Lynn Mobley was arrested Sept. 19 for grand theft of more than $5,000 and less than $10,000 after allegedly embezzling money from her cash drawer at Sun State Federal Credit Union where she was employed as a teller.

    In an incident report filed by Chiefland Police Officer Kyle Schultz, branch manager Carole Tucker stated that Mobley had been audited several times throughout the month and found a shortage of about $7,300 missing.

    According to the report, Tucker and other corporate leaders confronted Mobley and she confessed to systematically taking cash from her drawer for several months.

    Schultz stated that he read Mobley her rights, which she waived, and stated she had been taking money since August because she was having financial difficulties.

    Schultz stated Mobley was transported to the Levy County Detention Facility without incident.

  • Jones, CMHS girls pick up another Cross Country win

    A pair of Chiefland girls finished in the top three to help lift the Lady Indians to a cross country win Oct. 5 at the 34th Annual Cedar Key Invitational Cross Country Race.

    CMHS eighth-grader Lauren Jones led the crowd in the 5K, while fellow eighth-grader Banner Hodge took third.

    A rainstorm at the end of the event prevented accurate times from being recorded.

    The Lady Indians defeated 11 schools at the Invitational, which is supposed to be the final one worked by longtime Cedar Key School track coach Brad Penney, who is retiring after the school year.

    Chiefland sophomores Jaycie Anderson and Luke Stockman captured top-ten finishes for the CMHS girls’ and boys’ squads, respectively. Dylan Cochran finished 11th among the varsity boys for the Indians, while CMHS eighth-grader Donovan Simoga placed at No. 16.

    Also for Chiefland, sixth-grader Lily Macarthur and freshman Eleanor Frields finished in the top half of the field of more than 50 varsity girls, as did Indians sophomore Jonathan Cannon on the boys’ side.