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Today's News

  • Ready, Set, Skate

    The sun is shining on the powder coated surfaces of Chiefland’s new skate court at Delma Locke Park. Passersby can hear the clack of little wheels as thrashers ollie up on the rails and kickflip their way off.

    The park officially opens Monday, but area skaters couldn’t wait to be the first to ride the new surface. American Ramp Company designed, built and installed the court for the city of Chiefland; the install was finished Saturday.

  • Governor fills two Levy vacancies

    Gov. Charlie Crist has appointed Marsha Drew, vice mayor of Yankeetown, to an interim term on the Levy County Board of Commissioners and Bronson insurance agency owner Cameron Asbell to a vacant seat on the Levy County School Board.

    Drew will fill the vacancy created by the suspension of commission Chair William Samuel Yearty in District 3 and will serve during his suspension. Yearty and fellow Commissioner Tony Parker were suspended from office by the governor in November after being indicted on federal charges.

  • Refuge hosts annual open house in Suwannee

    The Friends and staff of the Lower Suwannee & Cedar Keys National Wildlife Refuges held an Open House last Saturday at the Suwannee Community Center in the town of Suwannee.

    Normally held at the Cedar Key NWR, this was the first time the annual event took place in Dixie County.

    “We wanted to give people over here an opportunity to get to know the Refuge,” said Refuge Manager John Kasbohm. “Based on the turnout we’ll probably rotate years – one year in Cedar Key, one here in Suwannee.”

  • Master Gardener classes come to Yankeetown

    Registration is open for a Select Master Gardener Class being held in Yankeetown from March 10 through April 28.

    The class, being held at the Yankeetown Woman ’s Club at No. 5 56th St., Yankeetown, is limited to 25 students, first come, first served. To register, call Audrey Sharp at 352-486-5131

    These classes are incorporated into the Nature Coast Master Gardener Training. The classes and their dates are:

  • Beckham's 'Canes advance

    Coach Kelly Beckham's Gainesville Hurricanes rode a big wave Tuesday en route to their 70-52 regional quarterfinal win over Jacksonville Wolfson. Leading by as much as 20 points early, the 'Canes fell prey to the Wolf Pack's half court trapping defense and gave up enough possessions to let the lead slip to seven. At halftime, with GHS up by 16, fans of the purple could see the rally coming their way and they bit their nails.

  • Whole lotta woofin’

    For one night, anyway, country fans at the Second Annual Bark-N-Purr charity concert reclaimed Florida roads as Nashville artist Craig Morgan wailed “International Harvester,” his hymn celebrating hardworking, road-hogging farm combine drivers.

  • Inglis reacts to proposed nuclear plant

    The debate about Progress Energy’s new nuclear energy plant still is lively, as proved at a Feb. 26 public testimony session in Inglis.

    “It will forever change our lives,” said the first person to speak, Inglis Commissioner Edward Michaels.

    For good or ill, all aspects of the project’s impact on people and their environment were to be considered as part of the site certification application in sworn testimony for public record before Administrative Law Judge J. Lawrence Johnston from the Division of Administrative hearings in Tallahassee.

  • Bronson wants a bite of Bark ‘n’ Purr money

    The Bronson Town Council is happy for the success of the two Bark ‘n’ Purr events held at Bo Diddley Park, but they would like to see some of the money raised coming to town coffers.

    “I would like to see that the town get some proceeds back,” said Council member Melody LaFlam, who noted that the town provides a facility and other services for the event. “That’s not unreasonable.”

    LaFlam asked the council to set a workshop on setting facility usage fees for the city’s facilities.

  • Seminole Indian War author to speak at quilt museum

    The Second Seminole Indian War, 1835 to 1842, was America’s most costly Indian War in money and lives lost and was experienced differently in the scattered settlements throughout the Territory of Florida. Early pioneers from Tallahassee to St. Augustine to Tampa to Micanopy lived with a constant sense of panic and apprehension out of fear of Indian attack. Soldiers sent by the US government to fight the Seminole and Miccosukee Indians experienced many tactical differences when fighting in remote places such as Charlotte Harbor, the Everglades, and the Cove of the Withlacoochee.

  • Residents should ask governor for appointment

    To the editor:

    It is very disconcerting that the vacancies on the Levy County Commission still sit vacant after almost four months of waiting for a decision from Tallahassee.   

    Everyone should know by now two commissioners were indicted and suspended by the governor in the middle of the fourth quarter of 2008.

    It is now almost the end of February and there have not been any appointments to the positions.