Today's News

  • Sheriff's Department honors its own

    The Levy County Sheriff’s Department held its annual awards ceremony Wednesday, Jan. 24, in Courtroom A of the Levy County Courthouse where it was standing-room only.

    Just before the ceremony started, with everyone waiting in anticipation, an official voice boomed, “All rise!” Catching everyone off guard, many in the gallery automatically stood up, before they realized a judge had not taken the bench. The courtroom erupted in laughter at the good-natured joke. The ceremony followed that light-hearted moment with stories of benevolence, heroism, spirit, valor and fellowship.

    Sheriff Bobby McCallum welcomed everyone to the awards ceremony, followed by Chief Deputy W.O. Brett Beauchamp giving the invocation and Colonel Mike Sheffield leading in the Pledge of Allegiance.

    McCallum welcomed County Court Judge James T. Browning, thanking him for the use of his courtroom and recognized Property Appraiser Oz Barker. McCallum thanked his employees for the great job that they have done throughout 2017 and all the years before that.

  • 'Dramatic' yard sale Saturday

    Do not forget this date: Saturday, Feb. 3, from 7:30 a.m. until 1 p.m.

    The CMHS Drama/AP Art History student group is holding a yard sale in front of the high school to raise funds for its Spring Break trip to New York. This educational trip will include visits to the 911 Memorial and Museum, Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Natural History Museum, Museum of Modern Art, Empire State Building and a Broadway showing of “The Lion King.”

    The yard sale will have items such as Clay Skeet Throwers, an electric fish knife, furniture, baby items household items and appliances, electronics ranging from gaming systems and games to HDTVs and movies. We also have sports equipment, clothes, and almost everything else under the sun. Sixty-seven individuals will be represented, so there will be something for everyone.

  • Sheriff’s office holds crisis training

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    Levy County Sheriff’s Deputy Grant Sandlin presented free crisis training class covering steps that should be taken when under attack. Approximately 25 people attended the training.

    The training took place at Bronson Middle High School.

    Sandlin began by talking about how humans react to crisis situations by fighting, fleeing, or freezing. He continued by saying how important it was to plan reactions, which consists of three options: running, hiding or fighting.

    “Your response can be just as fluid as the event,” Sandlin said. “In other words, you may need to change your options for reacting as the event unfolds.”

    He then covered some important points about each option.

    If running is the option chosen he instructed the class to plan an escape route, leave belongings behind, evacuate even if others around you freeze and warn others not to enter the area on your way out.

    “Do not attempt to evacuate or treat the wounded, instead tell them to try to stop the bleeding and play dead,” Sandlin said.

  • Slain deputy is memorialized

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    A hero from long ago was honored Jan. 25 when a portion of U.S. Highway 19/98 in Otter Creek was named after him.

    The hero’s name was Atticus Haygood Ellzey, who was slain Jan. 28, 1945 in Otter Creek.

    Levy County Sheriff Bobby McCallum spoke at the dedication ceremony. He was followed by Levy County Commission Chair John Meeks and James Ellzey, grandson of the slain deputy. Nearly all of the remaining Ellzey relatives, from the Levy County area, were present for the ceremony.

    Sheriff McCallum opened the ceremony by sharing the story of Atticus’ bravery that led him to be shot in the line of duty Jan. 28, 1945. The deputy was called to assist at a bar in Otter Creek because of some unruly patrons. Ellzey asked the two men to leave the establishment. They lured Ellzey into the woods off Highway 19 in Otter Creek where they ambushed and shot him. The deputy was able to identify the two men, and they were subsequently sent to prison.

    “Sheriff Ellzey is the only Levy County Sheriff in history to be killed in the line of duty,” MCCallum said.

  • Indians misfire on layups in loss to Dixie County

    If there was an encouraging development for Chiefland in their loss to Dixie County Jan. 16, it was that the Indians, despite missing so many layups and struggling to find much momentum on offense beyond point guard Jalen Rutledge, remained in the game until the final two minutes, trailing by just six points at one point in the final quarter.

    But the misses proved too costly in the end, as the Bears pulled away in the final moments, stretching out their advantage for a 79-63 win in Chiefland.

    Dixie County is still alive for the No. 2 seed in District 1A-7 after beating Trenton 61-53 on Jan. 22. Bell is the top seed.

    After trailing by as much as 15 in the third quarter, Chiefland got its deficit down to 54-48 early in the four on an Austin Adams floater. Dixie County responded with back-to-back buckets, including one off a pickpocket takeaway, before L.J. Jenkins converted on three free throws to get Chiefland back within seven.

    The Bears continued to toy with a double-digit margin however, and CMHS junior Payne Parnell gave his team its final single-digit margin of deficit with three free throws just before the two-minute mark.

  • Lady Indians spear Bears

    The Chiefland girls’ basketball found itself in the envious position against Dixie County of building up a big enough lead to allow playing time for its entire bench.

    The Lady Indians built up a 41-13 lead in the third on the heels of a Colby Reed 3-pointer.

    The playing time for the less experience varsity talent led to a surge by Dixie County, which cut its deficit to 49-36 with 2:45 remaining.

    But Reed issued the final dagger with her second 3 of the game, as Chiefland went on to prevail 58-37.

    The lanky junior finished with a team-high 14 points, and up-and-coming eighth-grader Nikki Fuller (13 points) and rebound machines Courtney Hayes (11 points) and Naja Martin (12 points) joined her in double figures.

    Hayes and Fuller, who was 3 of 5 at the foul line, each nabbed eight rebounds, and Martin added seven.

  • Picking trash in Levy County — immortal trash

    By Ed Emrich

    I hate trash. I really do! I notice how people discard items out of their vehicle windows or how they allow trash to blow out the beds of their trucks. Take a look around during dear hunting season and you will see an increase of empty plastic deer corm, dog food and ice bags along the roadside. Are some hunters unconcerned because they believe that the plastic bags will be picked up by road crews or picked up by concerned citizens who work to keep the Nature Coast natural. Maybe "Litter Bugs" believe that the plastic will eventually dissolve into the landscape and disappear. So what is the life expectancy of plastic trash? How long does it take for plastic to deteriorate and disappear into the landscape? According to my research, the short answer is NEVER! Plastic trash is in fact IMMORTAL!

  • Dear Mr. Denier, I believe in climate change

    Dear Mr. C. C. Denier:

    I know, I know, I know. Everybody used to always talk about “global warming” and then one fine morning we all woke up and everyone was saying “climate change.” It was all over the TV and radio news and talk shows, the internet and in print.

    But, I have to tell you Mr. Denier, this is my second full winter in Florida and 2018 is much, much colder than 2017.

    According to Weather Underground, the average mean temperature from Dec. 1, 2016, to Jan. 19, 2017, was 63 degrees. The average low was 38 degrees and the average high was 75 degrees. During the same period from December 2017 to Jan. 19, the average mean temperature was 56 degrees, the average low, 38 is the same; but the average high is 70 — five degrees cooler.

  • Parker joins local Chamber

    The Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce President Dr. Bennitt Patterson will introduce the business organization’s new executive director at noon Friday during its monthly meeting at the Haven Hospice Community Building.

    Joy Parker received the keys to the Chamber office Thursday, Jan. 11.

    “I’m here to help local businesses in the greater Chiefland area by promoting the ‘Buy Local Campaign’ as well as be involved in the growth of the Chiefland Chamber because a strong Chamber is good for business,” she said.

    She looks forward to having more community involvement and promoting events.

    “I’m grateful for this opportunity and I’m looking forward to working with the community and businesses in our area,” Parker said.

    Parker is married to Steve and they have two children. Steven graduated in 2016 from CHS and is currently working in the Boilermaker Union. Chelsea is a senior at CHS and is very active in school; she was elected Homecoming Queen and Ms. CHS this school year.

  • Dr. Patterson cuts ribbon on new office

    Dr. Bennitt Patterson cut the ribbon to the new location of Tri County Chiropractic Tuesday, Jan. 23, at 2010 N. Young Blvd., with the help of the Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce, patients, and friends.

    This is the 27th year Dr. Patterson has been providing chiropractic care in Chiefland. He began practicing in the city in 1991 by working for Dr. Keith Walburn. He bought the practice from him in January 1993. The business was on Park Avenue until March 3, 1997, when he moved to 2220 N. Young Blvd., north of Winn-Dixie.

    “We were there almost 21 years. We built the building and would have been there 21 years March 3,” he said. “I sold that building to North Florida Pediatrics.”

    He chose the new location because he has always liked the building’s architecture and location. He transformed the drive-thru into two treatment rooms where he and his staff offers massage therapy and a diverse range of chiropractic techniques to give patients the care they need.