.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Would you let your daughter color her hair blue?

    By Rebekah McCloud

    ContexTFlorida

    I recently took a ride on the new SunRail. I was among the throng onboard for a free ride and to see, as Dr. Seuss would say, “Oh, the places I could go.”

    When I entered the overstuffed car, a young woman immediately stood up and said to me, “Here, momma, take my seat.” And I did. I thanked her and commented about the kindness of her gesture.

  • Florida's new marijuana law

    ASK A LAWYER

    M. C. of Alachua asks, “What’s the deal with the new marijuana law? Someone told me that it didn’t apply to too many people. Is that true? So what is being voted on in November? Is that something different?”

    Dear M. C.:

  • Study shows flavor trumps health for blueberry buying

    By BRAD BUCK

    bradbuck@ufl.edu

    Taste trumps health benefits for blueberry buyers, sending a strong message that fruit consumers value flavor most, new University of Florida research shows.

    About 61 percent of blueberry consumers buy the fruit for its flavor, while 39 percent do so for psychological reasons, according to two national online surveys. By “psychological,” researchers mean those consumers may buy blueberries because they believe the fruit, which contains antioxidants, provides health benefits.

  • Church News for the week of August 7

    "River Jordon"

    to sing

    at Full Gospel

    Everyone is invited to the Full Gospel Outreach Saturday Night Gospel Sing Aug. 23, at 7 p.m.. The featured group will be "River Jordan" from Ocala. As always, there will be no admission charge for the sing. A free-will love offering will be received. Full Gospel Outreach Church is located just 3 miles north of the Chiefland Walmart on HWY 19.

  • UF ag and life sciences has new associate dean

    A professor and assistant chairman of the Department of Animal Sciences has been named associate dean of the University of Florida College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

    Joel Brendemuhl, with UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences since 1985, began work in his new role July 14, said college Dean Elaine Turner.

    Brendemuhl will provide leadership for admissions, enrollment, curricula and academic program assessment in the college, also known as CALS, Turner said.

  • UF art contest

       The University of Florida Elegance of Science art competition that stresses the connection between artistic and scientific perceptions of reality is now accepting submissions until Dec. 20.

       After a three-year hiatus, the Marston Science Library and Florida Museum of Natural History are re-introducing the contest to UF students, staff and faculty who have created two-dimensional images as part of their research or that feature scientific tools or concepts.

  • CF News

    CF ranked 13 in

    nation for affordability

    The College of Central Florida is ranked No. 13 in affordability in the United States, according to the U.S. Department of Education. CF tuition and fees for 2012-2013 were 66 percent below the national average of $7,407 for public four-year or above institutions.

  • Williston JROTC in need of funding

    They’re everywhere: parades, ballgames, community events and holiday celebrations.

    “They” are the members of the Williston High School JROTC honor guard and their fellow cadets, who for the first time in a long time, are finding themselves short on funding.

    Capt. Frank Clegg, the group’s commanding officer, recently appeared before Williston City Council to ask council members to remember the JROTC when fundraising efforts come about.

  • Officials break ground on new Williston school

    If the walls could talk, they would tell stories of romance, tales of adventure, fears of the unknown, unspeakable sorrows and dreams of the future.

    For more than 80 years, the walls of Williston High School have heard just about everything–most things repeated many times over.

     Since June they’ve heard a new story–one that’s not been told before and causes smiles, laughter and sometimes even giddiness. It is a story that will be repeated over and over for the next two years.

  • Officials: Cedar Key safe from red tide

    A red tide bloom in the Gulf has killed thousands of fish in the last two weeks, according to state officials, but Cedar Key is proving unaffected.

    Leslie Sturmer, a University of Florida aquaculture specialist in Cedar Key, said Monday that test samples for red tide toxins in the area's shellfish have yielded good results.

    "There are zero cells in the samples, as we suspected," she said, adding that 5,000 or more cells per liter in a sample would cause shellfish operations to close shop.