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Today's News

  • Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus

    Eight-year-old Virginia O'Hanlon wrote a letter to the editor of New York's Sun, and the quick response was printed as an unsigned editorial Sept. 21, 1897. The work of veteran newsman Francis Pharcellus Church has since become history's most reprinted newspaper editorial, appearing in part or whole in dozens of languages in books, movies, and other editorials, and on posters and stamps.

    "DEAR EDITOR: I am 8 years old.

    "Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus.

    "Papa says, 'If you see it in THE SUN it's so.'

  • Ex-Ford manager investigated for grand theft

    Donald Barrett, ex-manager of White Ford in Chiefland, is being investigated for grand theft by the State Attorney’s Office in connection with $709,000 in expenditures over the past 12 years according to a Chiefland Police Department report. The sworn complaint came after an extensive two-month audit by the dealership’s attorney John Bovay and certified public accountant Jeff Crippen.

  • Eight from 'Forgotten War' honored

    The room was large, easily capable of holding a hundred people. The group gathered was small, less than a dozen people, including two reporters. Outside the commission meeting room at Chiefland City Hall a father and two children came and went after paying a utility bill.  City Hall employ

  • Memories and missed opportunities

    Over the Thanksgiving holiday, I listened to an audiobook–Deliver Us from Normal–and one sentence from a very long book hung in my mind for days.

    “Mom made us hot cocoa–with salt.”

    Boy, did that bring back memories.

    As a treat on cold winter nights, my mother would take out the Hershey cocoa powder and make a pot full of steaming hot chocolate.

    In the days before Swiss Miss powder or Quik, Hershey’s cocoa was a staple in our home.

    I’d forgotten how good it was but that one sentence brought it all back.

  • Locals come through for their team

    The uniforms are on their way.

    Two weeks ago, the Citizen reported on the plight of the Chiefland boys' basketball program, which had lost all its home, away and practice uniforms in a break-in. Basketballs and video recording equipment were also taken, but the uniforms were the biggest problem.

    On reading the appeal, several local readers took action. At press time, Chiefland's Basketball Uniform Replacement Fund had received about $4,900 in donations, enough for Head Coach Mark Lundy to order uniforms.

  • What prompts this frenzy?

    Levy County is in a gossip frenzy. All it took was someone being out of the office, someone being added to the federal grand jury indictment that resulted in two Levy County commissioner being suspended and folks with nothing better to do than stoke the flames.

    The first::

    Sheriff Johnny Smith has not been arrested. This tidbit has been hanging around for weeks and keeps cropping up anew.

    Smith’s spokesman has said the sheriff has no comment — a number of times.

    This has just got to be hurting Smith’s family and we empathize.

  • Turnovers a factor as Lady Indians fall to Ft. White

    Still looking for answers, Chiefland girls fell 49-36 to Ft. White Thursday. They suffered from turnovers and struggled for three quarters to put the ball in the hoop, so that even a gonzo fourth quarter couldn't save them.

    “We're just not making easy shots,” said head coach Emily Gore.

  • Bronson bank robbed; three arrested

    Dog may be man’s best friend, but Brix, a K-9 partner in the Marion County Sheriff’s Office is no friend of suspected bank robbers.

    Brix was instrumental in the Tuesday arrest of John Patterson, 43, of Bronson in connection with the Dec. 12 robbery of an undisclosed amount of cash from Capital City Bank in Bronson.

  • Residents complain to commissioners about mud boggers

    The mud boggers are at it again in northern Levy County and one resident has asked the Board of County Commissioners for help because the traffic is tearing up a private road used by residents.

    Charles Wilkerson addressed commissioners in their regular Tuesday morning meeting saying that “four-wheelers and mud boggers are coming down the road” and tearing up Northeast 125th Street, a private road.

  • When people are needing, a day of work can help

    To the editor:

    My grandmother had many sayings she liked to repeat to us growing up. One of her favorites was “everyone can afford soap and water.” I always thought this to be true until recently. Like many others, I was laid off earlier this year. At first I was not worried, I’m a hard worker with great references. I thought I could get another job very soon. That was over five months ago.