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Today's News

  • Eagles avoid shutout in spring game

    When it was over, Bronson football head coach Al Cooksey sighed and said, “Next year, it won't be like this.”

    Bronson lost 46-7 in their home spring game against Hawthorne. It was no optical illusion – the Hornets looked substantially bigger, stronger and faster than the Eagles because they really were.

  • Eagles score late to dodge shutout

    When it was over, Bronson football head coach Al Cooksey sighed and said, “Next year, it won't be like this.”

    Bronson lost 46-7 in their home spring game against Hawthorne. It was no optical illusion – the Hornets looked substantially bigger, stronger and faster than the Eagles because they really were.

  • Freshman Fuller swipes four records in softball season

    Chiefland softball celebrated a 14-5 season that had them inches away from regional play. Head coach Wayne Weatherford thanked his players and their parents for “a great season,” noting that with their commitment, next year would be even better.

    Apart from district champ Williston, the team Chiefland never could get past this year, the Lady Indians' big nemesis was district runner-up P.K. Yonge. Before falling to Keystone Heights in the regional quarterfinal, the Blue Wave had suffered only one defeat on the season – to Chiefland.

  • Watermelon festival, parade to be held Saturday

    It's a big weekend if you like festivals and big crowds.

    It's a big weekend if you like parades and celebrations.

    And it's a really big weekend if you like watermelon.

    The 54th annual Watermelon Festival will be held in downtown Chiefland this weekend. Large crowds are expected at the all-day event, which opens at 8 a.m. with the opening of arts and crafts shows. At 9 there will be free watermelon and entertainment by the Salt Water Cowboys.

  • Buie Park problems aired

    Two members of the city’s planning board and a former mayor attended the Chiefland City Commission meeting last Tuesday evening, but a rezoning on the agenda was not their reason for speaking.

    It was their concern about Buie Park on the city’s south side.

    John Henry Donaldson, still recovering from an operation on his knee, was the spokesman for the small group, “We got a couple of problems at the park.”

    He said when the May Day reunion was held recently with several hundred people in attendance, the park’s bathrooms were shut down.

  • Andrews' suit dismissed for second time

    A Levy County judge has dismissed — for the second time — a defamation lawsuit filed by A.D. “Andy” Andrews, landscape tree grower and publisher of the Levy County Journal, against the Chiefland Citizen, a reporter, editor, publisher and the parent corporation, Florida Newspapers, Inc.

    Circuit Civil Judge David O. Glant dismissed the suit in October after it was pointed out that Andrews’ attorney:

    • did not properly request a retraction allowing five days to respond from all the parties as required by state law

  • EMS fees going up

    A June 16 public hearing on a mining application by the Levy County Commission has been put on hold until all the Ts are crossed and the Is are dotted.

    The commission decided to delay the hearing on the recommendation after Development Director Rob Corbitt asked to hold them back because all the landowners have not signed off on the special exception permit application.

  • Dark cars and credit cards

    Catching up on some news items you might have missed:

    Dark cars the culprit? California is considering a ban on the sale of cars painted black and other dark colors. The theory is that dark cars need more air conditioning to stay cool and that results in the emission of more dangerous gases than white cars.

    I have to wonder what would happened to hearses at the funeral homes.

    And what about black and white police cars? Remember "1 Adam 12, 1 Adam 12, See the man..."? Will Reed and Malloy's buddies have to take to white cars only?

  • In defense of the animals

    Editor:

    My family and I have been volunteering at the Billiar/Davis Sanctuary for several months. We have known Dr. Billiar in a professional capacity for two years. We have also had the honor and privilege of providing foster care for an endangered ape. As you know after one year of age, they can no longer be kept in a private residence. Lucky little ape, he now lives the life of Riley at Sue and Brian’s house.

  • D-day remembrance

    Editor: