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Today's News

  • Watson to challenge Boyd for House seat

    Republican Paul Watson announced that he has  officially launched his campaign for Florida House of  Representatives, District 11, to challenge incumbent Debbie Boyd of Newberry in the 2010 election.

    Watson is a long-time resident of Gilchrist County and the pastor of Bell Baptist Church.

  • The lights are coming, maybe next year

    This column is called Good News.

    It reports both varieties of good news: good as in feel good news and good news as in good news to use.

    Last week, it was about news your could use: Vice Mayor Theresa Barron's quest to have the city buy, rather than lease lighted Christmas decorations. Mayor Teal Pomeroy said he would like to see businesses buy and sponsor lights.

    Here's the feel good news: More people voted than usual in the Citizen online Christmas lights poll.  By Tuesday evening there were 53 votes.

    There were four options:

  • Letter: Chiefland's Good Samaritans

    My husband and I are presently deployed to Guantanamo Bay Naval Station, Cuba. Our home of record is Inverness, Florida. On a recent trip home, we were traveling along Rt. 19 on our way to Tallahassee and eventually to Pensacola to visit our children and grandchildren.

  • Levy Dwain Justice

    Levy Dwain Justice, 65, of Williston, died on August 6. He was born on February 14, 1944, in Jacksonville, to Audi and Norell Justice.

    He served in the U.S. Army Reserves. He worked as a metrologist for a nuclear power plant. He was of the Baptist faith. He moved to Williston 10 years ago from Pennsville, N.J.

    He was an amateur ham operator, call K4VSJ, from 1958 to current. He enjoyed doing amateur radio he enjoyed spelunking in high school and was known for running a 4.26 mile in 1961 at Duncan U. Fletcher High School in Neptune.

  • Fire money heats commission meeting again

    Fiery words flew at the Chiefland City Commission's Monday meeting leading Commissioner Frank Buie to ask at the end of the meeting if the discussion was “unprofessional.”

    “It didn't sound very professional tonight,” he said. “Did it sound professional Mr. Mayor?”

    Mayor Teal Pomeroy agreed it did not.

    For the third time in six weeks the commission and Fire Chief John Ward  wrangled over money he has set aside to purchase equipment.

  • Langworthy named top banking graduate

     Jason Langworthy, Perkins State Bank consumer/commercial lender, has been awarded the Florida Banker’s Association Florida School of Banking Honor Graduate for the Class of 2009.  

    Each year, the FBA Florida School of Banking presents an Honor Graduate Award to a graduating senior.

    This individual is chosen from the top 10 percent of the class by the program directors and staff.  

  • Amedisys opens in Chiefland

        Amedisys Home Health Care announced the opening of its office at 108 NW 3rd Avenue in Chiefland to service Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties.

        The agency be headed by Susan Bitson, and will offer a complete menu of home care services.    

     

  • Grandmother helps cops nab driver

    A Wakulla Springs man charged with drunken driving is learning the hard way that one should not mess with a grandmother from Old Town.

    He's also learning that head-butting a Chiefland police officer is not a good idea either. It can get one lightly tased — twice — and charged with resisting an officer with violence.

  • Bringing broadband to Levy might broaden horizons

    Bringing wireless internet to Levy County will provide a major boost to the economy, officials with the newly formed North Florida Broadband Authority say.

    “It’s a very large variable when it comes to attracting new businesses,” Pat Lien, project leader for NFBA, said.

    According Lien and other experts, many new businesses will turn away from areas unable to provide such services.

    But he also said broadband would increase opportunities for at-home businesses.

  • Bronson salon is a cut above for the jobless

    Spiraling downward.  Unending.  Stripes of red, white and blue.   

    Was it really just a spinning barber pole outside a local salon?  

    Or, was it a symbol echoing the feelings of so many Americans trying to get ahead, only to find they are getting further behind? Or maybe a helping hand?

    The sign out front, sandwiched between an enormous pair of scissors and a comb, read “The Hair Experts.”