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Today's News

  • CHS football coach transfers

    CHS football coach Ulmer stepping down to become dean.http://bit.ly/9YeycY

  • Hearing put off on exotic animal permit

     

    A public hearing on veterinarian's request for a permit to operate an exotic animal sanctuary in the Small Farms Unit 2 residential area of Morriston is postponed.

    The hearing on the special exception zoning permit by the Levy County Board of County Commissioners was to be held March 2 at 6:30 p.m.

    Rob Corbitt, county code enforcement director, said during the commission's regular Tuesday meeting that Dr. Suzanne Billiar has asked for a delay.

  • Dissolving Inglis may cost county

    The mayor of Inglis came to the Levy County Commission meeting with a message: If supporters of a referendum to dissolve the town are successful the county will be on the hook to operate the town's infrastructure and prove services.

    Mayor Bill Lake told the commissioners in their  Tuesday meeting that a referendum will be held on dissolving the town.

    Supervisor of Elections Connie Asbell has certified the organizers had met the minimum 84 signatures needed from among the town's 843 voters after 106 petitions were turned in to her office.

  • Mine test pit produces frustration for residents

    A handful of Yankeetown residents asked again to have the King Road limerock mine's test pit closed, but came away empty handed from the Levy County Commission's Tuesday meeting.

    Yankeetown Councilman Jack Schofield, who has been campaigning to have the pit filled in and the land reclaimed to its natural state, was not present at Tuesday's meeting. He was represented by Yankeetown Councilman Larry Feldhusen and the half-dozen residents accompanying Feldhusen.

  • Family donates artifacts from owner of Jackson House

    Leigh Anne Young and Amy Young, along with their father Ron Young and their Grandma Marion Freeland, presented the Town of Bronson with artifacts from the life of their great-great-grandfather Dr. James M. Jackson.

    Jackson was originally from Bronson, where he lived and worked before moving to Miami and starting the medical center known today as Jackson Memorial Hospital. His house was donated to the Town of Bronson by Perkins State Bank in 1998 and is now used as Town Hall.

  • School board trades less rent for guaranteed payment

    The School Board of Levy County approved a renegotiated tower lease with T-Mobile during their meeting on Tuesday that reduces the rent, but guarantees a 10-year income stream.

    The tower is on school district property, and the school board rents the tower space to the cellular company.

    With the new lease, T-Mobile will pay the school district $19,000 a year, down from $20,700. But T-Mobile will ensure the income for 10 years, whereas under the old 30-year lease they could cancel with 90 days notice.

  • Money squeeze gets tighter for schools

    Another precipitous drop in state revenues is bad news for local public schools, Superintendent Bob Hastings told the Levy County School Board at a Feb. 2 meeting.

    Hastings said no one knows what will happen with the state budgets when the Legislature’s session begins on March 2. “It’s anybody’s guess,” Hastings said.

    But he noted that the revenue estimate for the state’s coffers is down by $3 billion overall which translates to $1 billion less in state money for schools.

  • Community Calendar

    Today

    Fanning and Manatee Springs

    Working Group

  • The art of trash

    More than 75 people turned out to the opening Saturday night to see the 47 highly-creative entries, including five from exhibit judge Chick Schwartz.  

    Chick is a sculptor who works in bronze, cement, wood, ceramics and found objects. His work has been featured in more than 25 one person shows in galleries and museums across the U.S. and Canada.  

    Chick and his wife Marsha are the artists who conceived and built the fisherman and fish in the CKAC Sculpture Garden.

  • Gospel broadcaster has golden microphone

    Rhonda Cook’s eyes welled up with tears when she recounted the story of a woman who called her one day at the small radio station she runs out of Long Pond Baptist Church.

    The woman had recently lost a loved one and was calling Cook to praise her for the work she does.

    “The statement she made to me was, ‘ I couldn’t have got through the last two years had it not been for this station,’ ” Cook said.  “And that’s when you know what you’re doing is making a difference.”