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Today's News

  • Chiefland dominates early in win against Bronson

    Chiefland strung together one of its more satisfying performances on the season against Bronson Jan. 23 to lead by as much as 23 points in the second half.

    It was senior night for the Indians, who don’t have a senior on the roster, making for an ironic subtext behind the proceedings.

    Bronson, showing its pride against its a chief rival, made a run in the fourth quarter, but CMHS had enough cushion to absorb the blow at that point, as it went on to prevail 63-58.

    Chiefland a well-rounded scoring distribution, with newcomer Quay Brodus leading the way with 15 points. Jarrett Jerrels jumped out with seven points in the opening quarter to finish with 11 on the night for CMHS; Ty Corbin (five rebounds) and Austin Adams chipped in 10 and nine points, respectively. Payne Parnell had seven points and four boards for Chiefland.

  • Indians surrender early lead to Oak Hall

    The Chiefland boys’ basketball team had its share of mini-surges in the second half against Oak Hall Jan. 26 in the CMHS gym.

    But the Indians could never completely shake the deficit they carried into the break, as they fell 68-63 to the Gainesville private school in what turned out to be a disappointing, for CMHS, but mostly thrilling final quarter of action.

    Chiefland was under serious threat early in the fourth quarter as the Eagles pulled ahead 50-37. But back-to-back dazzling plays by sophomore Ty Corbin, including a 3-pointer and a behind-the-back assist to Sedrik Moultrie, energized the crowd and made the deficit manageable once again at 50-42.

    When OHS responded with a couple of buckets, Chiefland junior Payne Parnell connected on a 3 to take it back to an eight-point game.

    From there, Oak Hall remained ahead by 8-12 points, until an Austin Adams steal and assist – to Quay Brodus – and another Corbin 3 cut the Eagle lead to 62-58 with 3:05 remaining. Adams later added a 3-pointer of his own, but the Indians were done for the night scoring from the floor thereafter.

  • The best present I ever bought my wife

    I struggled this last year to figure out what to get my wife for Christmas this year. I’m a good gift-giver and I started trying to look around in October. My birthday is in October so I’m usually thinking about gifts then.

    She didn’t drop any hints. If she did, I wasn’t listening until finally, I just came out and asked, “What do you want for Christmas?”

    “I want an Alexa,” she said.

    “I thought you said they were a waste of money and that you didn’t want one,” I queried.

    “I didn’t, but my sisters have one and they keep telling me how much fun they are having and all the things it will do,” she replied.

    I have to remember to thank her sisters for putting an Amazon Echo in her mind because it is absolutely the best gift I ever got her for myself.

  • Indians misfire on layups in loss to Dixie County

    If there was an encouraging development for Chiefland in their loss to Dixie County Jan. 16, it was that the Indians, despite missing so many layups and struggling to find much momentum on offense beyond point guard Jalen Rutledge, remained in the game until the final two minutes, trailing by just six points at one point in the final quarter.

    But the misses proved too costly in the end, as the Bears pulled away in the final moments, stretching out their advantage for a 79-63 win in Chiefland.

    Dixie County is still alive for the No. 2 seed in District 1A-7 after beating Trenton 61-53 on Jan. 22. Bell is the top seed.

    After trailing by as much as 15 in the third quarter, Chiefland got its deficit down to 54-48 early in the four on an Austin Adams floater. Dixie County responded with back-to-back buckets, including one off a pickpocket takeaway, before L.J. Jenkins converted on three free throws to get Chiefland back within seven.

    The Bears continued to toy with a double-digit margin however, and CMHS junior Payne Parnell gave his team its final single-digit margin of deficit with three free throws just before the two-minute mark.

  • Lady Indians spear Bears

    The Chiefland girls’ basketball found itself in the envious position against Dixie County of building up a big enough lead to allow playing time for its entire bench.

    The Lady Indians built up a 41-13 lead in the third on the heels of a Colby Reed 3-pointer.

    The playing time for the less experience varsity talent led to a surge by Dixie County, which cut its deficit to 49-36 with 2:45 remaining.

    But Reed issued the final dagger with her second 3 of the game, as Chiefland went on to prevail 58-37.

    The lanky junior finished with a team-high 14 points, and up-and-coming eighth-grader Nikki Fuller (13 points) and rebound machines Courtney Hayes (11 points) and Naja Martin (12 points) joined her in double figures.

    Hayes and Fuller, who was 3 of 5 at the foul line, each nabbed eight rebounds, and Martin added seven.

  • Picking trash in Levy County — immortal trash

    By Ed Emrich

    I hate trash. I really do! I notice how people discard items out of their vehicle windows or how they allow trash to blow out the beds of their trucks. Take a look around during dear hunting season and you will see an increase of empty plastic deer corm, dog food and ice bags along the roadside. Are some hunters unconcerned because they believe that the plastic bags will be picked up by road crews or picked up by concerned citizens who work to keep the Nature Coast natural. Maybe "Litter Bugs" believe that the plastic will eventually dissolve into the landscape and disappear. So what is the life expectancy of plastic trash? How long does it take for plastic to deteriorate and disappear into the landscape? According to my research, the short answer is NEVER! Plastic trash is in fact IMMORTAL!

  • Dear Mr. Denier, I believe in climate change

    Dear Mr. C. C. Denier:

    I know, I know, I know. Everybody used to always talk about “global warming” and then one fine morning we all woke up and everyone was saying “climate change.” It was all over the TV and radio news and talk shows, the internet and in print.

    But, I have to tell you Mr. Denier, this is my second full winter in Florida and 2018 is much, much colder than 2017.

    According to Weather Underground, the average mean temperature from Dec. 1, 2016, to Jan. 19, 2017, was 63 degrees. The average low was 38 degrees and the average high was 75 degrees. During the same period from December 2017 to Jan. 19, the average mean temperature was 56 degrees, the average low, 38 is the same; but the average high is 70 — five degrees cooler.

  • Lady Bucs snap CMHS streak with explosive 1Q

    The Chiefland girls’ basketball team caught a red-hot Branford squad on the wrong night.

    The Lady Buccaneers stemmed the Lady Indians’ win streak at five games as they nearly eclipsed CMHS’ total scoring output for the night with 30 points in the first quarter.

    Branford jumped out to a 30-3 lead in the opening quarter before securing a 62-31 win in Chiefland.

    A series of half-court steals helped BHS build an insurmountable advantage in the first quarter with a 30-1 run. Chiefland played even with Branford for the remainder.

    It marked just the third time this season that Chiefland was held to under 39 points.

    Courtney Hayes paced the Lady Indians with 12 points, while Naja Martin hauled in a team-high 13 rebounds.

    “That’s going to happen to you sometimes, I’m just glad it was tonight and not in the district tournament,” Chiefland coach Buddy Vickers said. “I guess we still had the blues over last night (against Bronson). We were tired and we were hurting from (the Bronson game).”

    Defense, rebounding lead CMHS past FW

  • Reed, Norris guide Lady Indians past BMHS

    The Chiefland girls’ basketball team was led by a pair of standout efforts, one on offense and the other on defense, in Bronson Jan. 11.

    Junior Colby Reed, buoyed by an 11-point first quarter, led all scorers with 25 points, while Sierra “Cee Cee” Norris helped limit Bronson’s top scoring threat as the Lady Indians prevailed 65-48 at BMHS.

    Reed connected three times from 3-point range and added a handful of long 2s to her tally, as she helped her squad to a 19-8 lead in the opening quarter. One of those long field goals put Chiefland ahead by 24 in the fourth, before Bronson finished on a 9-2 run.

    “When she gets her feet right, she can hit it,” CMHS coach Buddy Vickers said of Reed. “We talked about that before we went on the floor.”

    Naja Martin and Courtney Hayes finished with 10 points apiece for Chiefland and led on the boards. Hayes finished with a game-high 14 rebounds, making it her fourth straight game with double-figure boards, while Martin nine rebounds.

  • Jalen Hurts showed us his true character

    Today, Jalen Hurts will not get the ESPN coverage. His image will not be plastered over Sports Center and other news programming. People will not be inundated with his heroic performance of throwing a perfect back-shoulder pass or some long beast mode type run to win the game.

    No. Those accolades will go to someone else- and deservingly so. However, in an age of “me, me” and “I have to get mine,” Jalen Hurt’s response to being pulled at the half of the national championship game will go highly unnoticed.

    Only a year removed from nearly pulling off one of the greatest plays in history for a true freshman quarterback until another great player and Heisman Trophy finalist quarterback upstaged him in defeat; he was devastated once again by being benched.

    While he clearly wanted to be in the game on that final drive evidenced by him visibly shaking on the sideline as adrenaline flowed; he stood there, cheered for his teammate, and once hugged the guy who had taken his place.

    After the game, he was all smiles and displayed genuine happiness for he and his teammates.