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Today's News

  • CMHS track standouts compete at prestigious Florida Relays

    The athletes of the Chiefland track and field team that competed at the 2018 Pepsi Florida Relays in Gainesville over spring break faced an uphill challenge, as they ran and hurdled against some of the top competition from around the state.

    But the Indians’ appearance – and effort – was impressive in itself, as they boasted what was likely the youngest group of runners at the University of Florida-hosted three-day meet from March 29 to March 31. And the experience was invaluable for Coach Lee Bell’s teams, as they turned in performances on a state-of-the-art track against fields of competitors that rivaled those at the state championships. The runners had to deal with long breaks between events, up to five or six hours in some cases, and rainy conditions on Friday.

  • CMHS quintet snatch wins in Monticello

    Five different Chiefland athletes combined for eight individual wins while the Indians collected an additional 18 top-3 finishes at the Jefferson County Tri Meet March 22 in Monticello.

    Reagan Hudson led the charge for CMHS with three first-place finishes – Girls 100 Hurdles (20.57 seconds); Girls 300 Hurdles (1:00.75) and Girls Discus Throw (75 feet, 9 inches) – and a second place (Girls High Jump, 4-04.0).

    Lady Indians junior Courtney Hayes prevailed in the Girls High Jump at 4-08.0.

    Sophomore Luke Stockman led the Indian boys with a first-place finish in the Boys 1600 meter run (5 minutes, 24.61 seconds) and the 3200 (2 mile) at 12:03.16. Senior Tramaine Brown collected first in the Boys Long Jump (17-02.0) for CMHS.

    For the Lady Indians, eighth-grader Lauren Jones took first in the Girls 1600 (5:48.43) and won unopposed in the 3200 (12:29.08).

    Senior Quay Brodus nearly added another win for Chiefland, as he tied for first in the Boys High Jump at 36-04.0, but was marked at second on the tiebreaker. Brodus added a No. 3 finished in the shot put (17-03.5).

  • CMHS track to honor past coaches

    Chiefland Middle High School track and field is hosting the first-ever C. Doyle McCall and Wendell Corbin Honorary Invitational Track Meet Thursday, April 5, in honor of two coaches who built the foundation of the program.

    McCall, best known as a legendary football coach for the Indians, founded the track program in 1953, and Corbin helped take it to new heights as a longtime coach. A special presentation will be held at 3:15 p.m. before the meet to honor the two coaches. McCall is unable to attend due to health reasons, so a member of one of his first track teams, Jolyn Corbin, will accept the honor on his former coach’s behalf.

    With six schools slated to participate, including Bronson, Williston, Mayo-Lafayette and Jefferson County, the meet will be as large or larger than any meet in recent years hosted at CMHS.

    The meet will start at 3:30 p.m., beginning with the 4x800 relay, followed by the field events, and then the remaining running events.

    The CMHS Running Sports Booster Club is putting on the meet with award sponsorships from Bar-B-Q Bill’s and Chiefland Farm Supply.

  • Compromise now or lose later

    We don’t use datelines at the Citizen because we are a hyperlocal newspaper because, as a general rule, we do not publish anything that is not related to Levy County. If we did, then the rule is that a dateline should tell the reader the basic information for the story was obtained in the datelined city. There are 30 American cities that stand alone without state names. All of those cities have a global identity for one reason or another. I could argue that Columbine, Newtown and Parkland could be added to the list because those three cities have a global identity.

    I am not advocating for the government to come and take someone’s gun and neither am I advocating for someone with a gun to take away someone’s child.

  • Lady hoops standouts recognized at banquet

    The Chiefland Middle High School girls’ basketball program has promising talent coming up through its ranks, and lose just one senior starter next season.

    To realize its tantalizing potential, however, its young student-athletes will have to put in the gym time in the offseason.

    At the Lady Indians’ end-of-the-season banquet at Hardeetown Baptist Church March 12, the girls were honored for their contributions and impressive improvements throughout the year. It was also a chance for coaches Buddy Vicker and Jason Whistler – and CMHS Principal Dennis Webber – to paint of picture of what is required to be great going forward.

    Webber, in his introduction, unofficially introduced the theme of the evening in quoting women’s basketball coaching legend Pat Summitt, citing her claim that the competitor needs to “continually raise the bar.”

  • The wonderment of technological advances

    I used to think how wonderful it must have been for someone born in the 1890s, like my grandpa and lived through the Industrial Revolution, the Great Depression, two world wars, the Ford assembly line, airplanes, space travel, the telegraph, telephone, radio, television — everything we use all the time and don’t give a second thought — my grandpa saw in its very beginning.

  • I love spring, pollen

    I love spring.

    The other seasons are OK, but spring is — as Muhammad Ali described himself — the greatest.

    I like the boiling heat of summer. We always joked in Oklahoma and Texas that it was so hot you could fry an egg on the sidewalk, but I’ll bet in Florida that you could boil an egg in the Gulf. I wish the Watermelon Festival was in a cooler month. I guess it would be if melons were a winter crop.

    I couldn’t tell much difference between summer and fall during my one full year here in the Sunshine State. I didn’t like winter too much. It was much colder than I thought it would be, but it wasn’t as rainy as I imagined. Also, deer come out during the wintertime and stand alongside roads; staring, daring. At night, they’re hard to see with flat dull coats; they give me the creeps; ghosts with big eyes glowing red in my lights. Deer along the roadside instill fear in me until I pass it by. Then, dread starts to build again and I pray I’ll see the next one in my headlights.

  • Citizen Viewpoint: Kudos to Levy County Animal Control

    Levy County Animal Services takes a small step forward in Levy County.

    We want to recognize the efforts of Levy County Animal Control for the new efforts to curb the number of unwanted animals in Levy County. The county recently launched a feral cat sterilization program. In this new plan, the county will provide traps to be used by residents to trap feral cats, so they can be brought to the animal control offices to be spayed or neutered.

    While the problem of unwanted pets is a challenge for many communities, we must take a more responsible approach. We as a community should recognize this first step of many needed improvements in how we treat our pets.

    The Levy County Animal Services always receives criticism for whatever they do. We know and understand the role they have. It is easy to be a critic. While we don’t know or are in a position to criticize or compliment their work, we all need to recognize the importance of their work.

  • A few tips for driving under the influence

    I’ve been thinking about this for awhile now, but never seemed to get around to writing anything about it. But, while going through the police reports, I was reminded again that it takes someone unlike me to be a police officer.

    Police officers see good people at their absolute worst and — they also see bad people at their absolute worst. Fortunately, most bad people who commit criminal acts are either really dumb or careless and get caught sooner than later.

    To help those who have a propensity to break the law, I have come up with a few tips that might help you stay out of trouble.

    First tip: Anyone who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs should always perform a complete vehicle inspection before driving through Chiefland.

    Second: Highway 19 is wide and there is absolutely no reason to cross a yellow line into oncoming traffic unless you’re high.

    Third: You’re still high if you think you can speed through Chiefland.

  • Indian bats come up short in rivalry tilt

    With just two regular season games under its belt heading into a road game against Lafayette March 6, the Chiefland baseball team has been solid in two of the three major phases of the game.

    Unfortunately, the bats had yet to follow the example of the Indians’ strong pitching and defense.

    In a repeat of its score at Williston in the season opener, CMHS fell 3-1 to Trenton Feb. 27, dropping the club to 0-2.

    Kelby Osteen and Wyatt Hammond combined to allow just three hits against the Tigers on the mound, while the Chiefland defense, for the second game in a row, committed only one error.

    Osteen made it through five innings as the starter, surrendering two earned runs and five walks while fanning four batters. Hammond tossed a pair of frames in relief, yielding one hit, no runs and no walks, and collecting a pair of strikeouts.

    Keegan McLelland drove in Seth Thomas on an RBI double for a 1-0 Chiefland lead in the first. Thomas and McLelland, who have hit safely in both regular season games, accounted for the only CMHS hits.