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Today's News

  • Taking a knee?

    By Bob Denny

    I played football with “Loopie” Favre, back in high school. Our coach would yell, “Take a knee!” when he wanted to offer us some “constructive criticism,” or more often, to “chew us out.” (You may be familiar with Loopie’s son, another pretty good quarterback.)

    To a football player, “taking a knee” means “Listen up! I need your attention for something important!” It was never a sign of disrespect, or a way to express anger. It was just a way of communicating to a bunch of us that there’s something important, that really needs to be said.

  • Industrial Arts: A disappearing necessity

    By Ed Emrich 

    I became a teacher very late in my working career. After 25 years in corporate management I found myself with an “opportunity” to redirect and re-evaluate my career. So I decided to become a teacher and give something back to society. I was by decades the oldest person in all of my graduate classes at Western Michigan University (Go Broncos). Most teachers graduate from college, go into teaching in their early 20s, and really, what life lessons can they teach? As a 57 year-old Marine Corps veteran and “new teacher,” I have had a lot of life experience that came in real handy because today’s students seriously need mentors as well as lessons about specific core content.

  • What kind of nation is the United States of America?

    What kind of nation is the United States of America? Are we hateful or grateful? Did the United States become the most powerful nation on earth through “Manifest Destiny” or greed? Are we a religious or secular nation?

    Ponca Indian Chief Standing Bear was a Christian man and farmer, but I’ll bet if he were asked what he thought about the US, he would say it is all those things. Standing Bear lost his daughter and then his son because of his tribe’s forced relocation from Nebraska to Indian Territory (Oklahoma). Some Christian women prayed with him and his family in Kansas when his daughter died. Still, he continued the journey to Indian Territory. The last straw for Standing Bear came at the death of his 16 year-old son. After that, he disobeyed the federal government and returned to his homeland in Nebraska to bury his son.

    Instead of looking at one's actions, ask what someone is trying to say when they take a knee at a football game.

    What was Standing Bear trying to say?

  • Tigers run past Eagles

    A young Bronson football team took its lumps against a veteran Trenton squad last Friday, as the Tigers rolled with eight rushing touchdowns for a 74-8 win.

    Moments after Bronson quarterback Christian Kidd went out with an injury, Trenton senior Eric Henry lifted the Tigers to a 21-0 lead on a scoop-and-score with 4:35 remaining in the opening quarter.

    The Eagles’ fortunes improved some on the ensuing drive, thanks to a couple of Trenton penalties, as BMHS moved into Trenton territory. But after the Eagles were stopped at the 35, Trenton reeled off four rushing TDs on its next four possessions, before a Tyrique Baber pick six put TMHS ahead 54-0 by the break.

    Baber and senior fullback Randy Fuller had a pair of rushing scores apiece for the Tigers.

    Despite the struggles, Bronson showed its team attitude has matured, as it maintained its effort to hit a couple of big plays late in the game. Near the end of the third quarter, Cole Langston took an end-around 27 yards, setting up a 32-yard score by Kidd, who raced to the corner. Kidd then converted the two-point conversion.

  • Lady Indians’ late surge comes up short versus Lafayette

    The Chiefland volleyball team’s record doesn’t exactly reflect just how competitive the squad can be against some of its best opponents.

    The Lady Indians have shown themselves to be fast starters in early matches this season, but against Lafayette (Mayo) on Sept. 28, they proved their stamina has improved.

    Behind a run of service aces by senior Sydney Allen, CMHS rallied for a 25-22 win over the Lady Hornets in the third set, before falling in the fourth in a 3-1 loss in non-district action.

    Chiefland was coming off a 3-2 win over district foe Branford, which is vying for a No. 3 seed with CMHS. The Lady Indians dropped a non-district meeting Monday with Bell 3-0. Chiefland, which was 6-11 before its double-header against Trenton Tuesday, gets another crack at Bell (14-4) on Friday at home (JV tips off at 3:30 p.m.).

    The Lady Indians celebrate senior night against Newberry on Monday Oct. 9.

  • First-quarter shell shock

    Facing what could very well be the strongest team on its schedule, Chiefland could not afford excessive mistakes and a deep deficit.

    Unfortunately, for the Indians, their first quarter against the Bears was a perfect storm of everything that’s plagued the young team to date.

    CMHS turned it over four times in the opening quarter while DCHS reeled off five TDs on just 14 plays en route to a 42-7 win at C. Doyle McCall Field in Chiefland on Sept. 21.

    The Bears improved to 5-0, while Chiefland fell to 1-3.

    “Dixie County’s a great football team, a well-coached football team,” CMHS coach Adam Gore said, “and honestly that’s where we want to be. Hats off to them. They have great athletes too.

    “We come out and we weren’t concentrating on beating Dixie County. When you go through the motions and you have those turnovers, that’s the result.”

  • Running away with it

    The Chiefland boys’ and girls’ cross country squads battled the heat on their home turf in a 5K meet last Thursday, Sept. 21, for a couple of strong showings.

    The Lady Indians improved to 2-0 with a win behind Lauren Jones’ No. 1 overall finish for the girls. Jones, who qualified for the state championship as a seventh-grader last year, notched a time of 20:44.

    “I just try to stick to my pace and not get worn out at the start,” Jones said.

    Banner Hodge (No. 4, 25:39), Jaycie Anderson (No. 5, 25:57) and Jolie Anderson (No. 6, 25:58) finished in the top six with Jones to help life CMHS to the win, while Lily Macarthur (No. 13, 29:21), Tabitha Welch (No. 16, 30:06) and Eleanor Frields (No. 17, 30:41) also finished in the top 20 for the Lady Indians.

    “All of my girls are improving each meet,” said CMHS coach Lynda Aldrich, who also commended her boys’ efforts.

  • City adopts final millage rate, budget

    Chiefland City Commissioners narrowly approved the new millage rate for Fiscal Year 2017-18 during the final budget meeting Monday.

    Resolution 17-09 adopts a final millage rate of 6.9850 is 17.46 percent greater than the rolled-back rate of 5.9468 and for that reason, Commissioners Teresa Barron and Rollin Hudson voted against the motion offered by Commission Donald Lawrence and seconded by Commissioner Chris Jones. Mayor Betty Walker joined Lawrence and Jones in voting for approval. The new rate is projected to raise $878,608 in taxable revenue.

    With that done, commissioners voted by the same margin to approve Resolution 17-10 to set the budget at $5,023,904 in projected revenues and expenses.

  • NCBS opens in Cedar Key

    By REBECCA GALLAGHER
    Citizen Correspondent

    The long-awaited opening of the new Nature Coast Biological Station has arrived. Residents of Cedar Key and surrounding areas turned out en masse to get a view of the new building.

    Dr. Michael Allen, director of the NCBS, said that the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences has been active in Cedar Key with research, teaching and extension programs along the nature coast in for about 30 years and yet never had an office.

    “This will be our home,” he said. “This building will provide a research facility and offices for scientists, graduate students and technicians.”

  • Peaton: 'We got lucky'

    As the cleanup continues from the debris left by Hurricane Irma, Levy County Emergency Management Assistant Director David Peaton said Friday, Sept. 15, they are in the recovery stage. They are checking on all the buildings, getting all the shelters and county equipment cleaned up and then just collecting data.

    “We’re checking on what was the financial burden on the county and what was the financial burden on the citizens, getting schools open as well as government offices,” he said.

    There were still about 2,000 customers of Central Florida Electric Cooperative without electricity. That number was down from 26,168 customers countywide who lost power during Hurricane Irma that hit North Central Florida Sept. 10 – 11.