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Today's News

  • Senator Nelson discusses issues on stop in Fanning Springs

    Healthcare was a hot topic during U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson’s stop at the Suwannee River Fair and Livestock Association Tri-County Pavilion in Fanning Springs on Aug. 29.

    A crowd of around 45, including many local officials from the Tri-County area, gathered to hear the Democratic senator, who soon handed the floor over to those in attendance to voice their concerns over issues that are affecting the area.

    The topic of health care was introduced early, as Gilchrist and Levy County officials relayed their problems in dealing with rising costs. Inmate health care was raised as a major example, both in the costs of care that falls on counties, and in the lack of rural healthcare providers, which adds more transport costs for local law enforcement. The need for affordable on-site mental health care for inmates was a key point of the discussion.

  • Around the world in 120 days

    A Russian newspaper reported the future had come to its village with the speed of the past. Three months later, that future arrived in Chiefland personified by a German man on a Norwegian electric bicycle.

    Robert Mohr, 41, left Oslo, Norway, May 16 at noon with the hope of riding into the Guinness Book of World Records on a Buddy Bike Model M2. He expects to finish during the Street Life Festival in Munich on Sept. 9-10.

    He got the idea of circumventing the globe because he wanted, “to do something pollution-free in my life. The environment is so polluted and it’s getting worse. This is the way to show that you can travel on electric bikes like this, so you should be able to do this in your hometown.”

    Though he is not a hardcore environmentalist, he became sensibilized to pollution while studying geography for his job as a logistics writer, “But I’m not a Greenpeace member, but I think it’s important to leave this world not like we found it because that’s impossible, but at least so our children and grandchildren can survive.”

  • Chiefland football welcomes Bucs

    Branford Buccaneers (0-1) at Chiefland Indians (0-1), Friday, Sept. 1, 7:30 p.m.

    This one wasn’t pretty last year.

    Branford was in town as Chiefland’s homecoming opponent, and the pair locked heads in a phone booth for four quarters only to look up at a 0-0 tie on the scoreboard at the end of regulation.

    Senior Lonnie Hinote punched in the winning score in overtime to lift the Indians to a 6-0 win.

    Friday marks the second of three straight home games in Chiefland to open the season.

    CMHS hopes to avoid such a defensive slugfest this year, as it’s found success with big passing plays this young season. Four turnovers helped put Chiefland in a 28-0 hole against Trenton in the opener, before it found a spark behind a couple of long passes to junior Kirk Williams and a trick play on fourth down that sprung quarterback Wyatt Hammond for a receiving touchdown.

    Branford is coming off a 48-8 season-opening loss to Seven Rivers Christian, a Class 2A offensive powerhouse from Lecanto that’s reeled off three consecutive eight-win seasons under Ray Greene.

  • Indians climb back for thrilling second half against Trenton

    The Chiefland football team faced a steep enough challenge for its opening week in taking on rival Trenton, a school that entered last Friday having defeated the Indians seven straight seasons by an average of 29 points.

    But then a flu bug devastated the program, even sidelining its head coach, during the week in the run-up to the game.

    After the game kicked off, the Indians found themselves mired in yet more adversity, as they turned it over four times in the first half on fumbles – including on fumbled snaps on three consecutive drives – to help the Tigers leap to a 28-0 lead.

    The game was teetering on the brink of becoming another lopsided Trenton win, the kind it’s enjoyed in five of the previous seven years, and every year since 2013, when Chiefland hung tight with the eventual state champions in a 17-14 loss.

    But then something happened.

    Junior quarterback Wyatt Hammond twice connected on long plays with fellow junior Kirk Williams, including on a 32-yard touchdown pass that saw Williams leaping at the goal line to haul in the score with 1:12 remaining in the opening half.

  • Chiefland football welcomes Bucs

    Branford Buccaneers (0-1) at Chiefland Indians (0-1), Friday, Sept. 1, 7:30 p.m.

    This one wasn’t pretty last year.

    Branford was in town as Chiefland’s homecoming opponent, and the pair locked heads in a phone booth for four quarters only to look up at a 0-0 tie on the scoreboard at the end of regulation.

    Senior Lonnie Hinote punched in the winning score in overtime to lift the Indians to a 6-0 win.

    Friday marks the second of three straight home games in Chiefland to open the season.

    CMHS hopes to avoid such a defensive slugfest this year, as it’s found success with big passing plays this young season. Four turnovers helped put Chiefland in a 28-0 hole against Trenton in the opener, before it found a spark behind a couple of long passes to junior Kirk Williams and a trick play on fourth down that sprung quarterback Wyatt Hammond for a receiving touchdown.

    Branford is coming off a 48-8 season-opening loss to Seven Rivers Christian, a Class 2A offensive powerhouse from Lecanto that’s reeled off three consecutive eight-win seasons under Ray Greene.

  • County seeks bids for Courthouse renovations

    Levy County needs a new courthouse, but the project is too cost-prohibitive at the moment.

    That’s what Paul Silverman, trial court administrator for the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Appeals, found in exploring the courthouse’s infrastructure needs and the options available.

    However, he concluded there are affordable short-term options available to address its pair of most pressing security needs.

    Silverman provided an update to the County Commission on Aug. 22, arguing for a plan to convert a room next to the Clerk of Court’s office into a small courtroom for hearing cases from the Circuit Court in order to alleviate traffic between litigants, judges and others in the hallways between hearing rooms and waiting areas.

    Silverman said there is $1.3 million available in state grant funding to put toward a new courthouse or renovations. In discussing courthouse priorities with various officials, Silverman said there’s a consensus that favors a new courthouse, but opposes spending the $1.3 million on renovations.

  • Gulf Hammock community seeks to reestablish original boundary, identity

    The citizens of the Gulf Hammock area, located around 17 miles southwest of Chiefland along U.S. Highway 19, want their official identity back.

    With the blessing of an endorsement letter from the county, which was won unanimously at the Levy County Commission meeting on Aug. 22, the people of Gulf Hammock appear to be inching toward one of their major goals, which is the re-establishment of an original boundary and zip code to reflect Gulf Hammock.

    The prelude to that endorsement was a July meeting in Gulf Hammock between area residents and county officials. They discussed complaints over emergency response times to the area as well as regaining their postal community status as Gulf Hammock.

  • Gulf Hammock community seeks to reestablish original boundary, identity

    The citizens of the Gulf Hammock area, located around 17 miles southwest of Chiefland along U.S. Highway 19, want their official identity back.

    With the blessing of an endorsement letter from the county, which was won unanimously at the Levy County Commission meeting on Aug. 22, the people of Gulf Hammock appear to be inching toward one of their major goals, which is the re-establishment of an original boundary and zip code to reflect Gulf Hammock.

    The prelude to that endorsement was a July meeting in Gulf Hammock between area residents and county officials. They discussed complaints over emergency response times to the area as well as regaining their postal community status as Gulf Hammock.

  • Gulf Hammock community seeks to reestablish original boundary, identity

    The citizens of the Gulf Hammock area, located around 17 miles southwest of Chiefland along U.S. Highway 19, want their official identity back.

    With the blessing of an endorsement letter from the county, which was won unanimously at the Levy County Commission meeting on Aug. 22, the people of Gulf Hammock appear to be inching toward one of their major goals, which is the re-establishment of an original boundary and zip code to reflect Gulf Hammock.

    The prelude to that endorsement was a July meeting in Gulf Hammock between area residents and county officials. They discussed complaints over emergency response times to the area as well as regaining their postal community status as Gulf Hammock.

  • Hundreds of CES students, parents meet their teachers

    It’s held during work hours, but you wouldn’t know it from the impressive turnout it garners.

    Chiefland Elementary School held its annual Meet the Teacher event Wednesday, the day before school started, and it was another hit.

    Hundreds of students and parents flooded the hallways to find their classrooms and meet their teachers.

    It’s also a chance for students to meet some classmates and in some cases engage in some activities in the classroom.

    Meanwhile, parents get to discuss details about class supplies and expectations as well as sign up for volunteering sessions and other support opportunities.

    The event was held from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., so there’s time for teachers to give one-on-one attention to parents and students.

    There was already a large group of parents and students forming outside the school by 1 p.m.

    In the lobby outside by the entrance, the school had its greeting case redecorated to read, in the form of an acronym for W.E.L.C.O.M.E., “When you Enter this Loving school, Consider yourself One of the special Member of an Extraordinary tribe.”