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Today's News

  • Homeowners beware of bad contractors

    In the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, people are scrambling to rebuild their lives and homes.

    Unfortunately, bad actors can take advantage of honest folks during these moments of stress, when everyone is eager to get their lives back in order. There are resources available that can help homeowners avoid being taken advantage of during this challenging time.

  • Love is all we need

    Too many tragedies, too recently. So many innocent victims. There is panic, but there is also courage, and heroism, and kindness that come out in tragic times and events.

    Maybe more than ever, this is the time to come together because of our humanity, empathy, concern for our fellow man, and to reach out in love, prayer, and good will for all. It’s what we’re made of.

    Let’s choose to believe that good always, and eventually, wins out over all the negativity in the world.

    Today, and every day, be kind to others. Reach out with a kind word and a smile.

    Resolve whatever may keep us separated from each other, and let’s be the wonderful people we are created to be.

    Help someone less fortunate than you.

    Be there for those who can use support and encouragement.

    Are you interested in a ground roots movement for bringing in a little more light and a little more love to your community, and to your world?

    Call or email me with your ideas, suggestions, or support for a meeting of minds.

  • What makes good people do bad things?

    I knew this kid growing up. He was a good kid, quiet, friendly. I liked him. I liked his sister better. I never knew of Sonny doing anything truly bad, just kid stuff, teenager stuff, stuff that I hope he grew out of.

    He and his sister were raised by their father, Shorty, a single parent, who mowed yards and probably collected welfare for a living. I grew up in a very small, rural town. It was in an agricultural area and once a retail hub where farmers and their families shopped. Then came WWII and it seemed like most people moved to Dallas to go to work. The town was dying, but it never seemed to take its last breath. So, most of the people I knew were on government assistance in one form or another.

  • Holiday Food Boxes

    One Way Church of Chiefland is creating Holiday Food Boxes for needy families. Holiday Food donation boxes located at The Gathering Table, 116 N. Main St.; The Print Shop, 224 N. Main St.; and Dollar General, 1310 N. Young Blvd. In Trenton, boxes are located at Dollar General, 702 N. Main St.; and Ayers Health and Rehabilitation Center, 606 N. Seventh St. Place nonperishable food items at any one of these locations and be a part of blessing a needy family this holiday.

  • Railroads and Riverboats are on display at Levy County libraries

    An excursion into the Golden Age of Transportation awaits patrons of the Levy County Public Libraries.

    For the next six months, each of the local libraries will have a display of photographs of the railroads and riverboats that plied the waters of the Suwannee River and surrounding waters.

    Steam navigation started on the Suwannee during the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-1842) when the vessels were utilized to carry U.S. soldiers to the interior of Florida and bring the captured Seminoles Indians out to the coast for transport west. Commercial navigation ended when the City of Hawkinsville was abandoned by her last Captain, Mr. Currie, on May 19, 1922.

    Today the vessel rests in shallow water on the west bank of the Suwannee River above Old Town.

    Another well known vessel of Suwannee River fame was the Madison, owned and operated by Capt. James Tucker. Not only did the vessel gain recognition providing the residents of the Suwannee River with much needed supplies, but also served under the Confederacy during the Civil War transporting troops and food stuffs and protecting the river.

  • Jones, CMHS girls pick up another Cross Country win

    A pair of Chiefland girls finished in the top three to help lift the Lady Indians to a cross country win Oct. 5 at the 34th Annual Cedar Key Invitational Cross Country Race.

    CMHS eighth-grader Lauren Jones led the crowd in the 5K, while fellow eighth-grader Banner Hodge took third.

    A rainstorm at the end of the event prevented accurate times from being recorded.

    The Lady Indians defeated 11 schools at the Invitational, which is supposed to be the final one worked by longtime Cedar Key School track coach Brad Penney, who is retiring after the school year.

    Chiefland sophomores Jaycie Anderson and Luke Stockman captured top-ten finishes for the CMHS girls’ and boys’ squads, respectively. Dylan Cochran finished 11th among the varsity boys for the Indians, while CMHS eighth-grader Donovan Simoga placed at No. 16.

    Also for Chiefland, sixth-grader Lily Macarthur and freshman Eleanor Frields finished in the top half of the field of more than 50 varsity girls, as did Indians sophomore Jonathan Cannon on the boys’ side.

  • Toys for Tots registration dates in Tri-County area

    The U.S. Marine Corps Reserves begins registration for Toys For Tots Registration in Levy County will be open to all three counties, however, to ease transportation barriers and to ensure sufficient volunteer assistance on-hand for each site, please take advantage of registration dates in your home county, when possible.

    Dixie County: Friday, Oct. 20, 9 a.m.12 p.m. Dixie County Public Library, 16328 US-19, Cross City, FL 32628

    Gilchrist County: Friday, Oct. 27, 9 a.m.12 p.m. Gilchrist County Public Library, 105 NE 11th Ave, Trenton, FL 32693

    Levy County: Mon-Thurs, Oct. 15, from 9 a.m.12 p.m., Tri-County Community Resources, 15 North Main St in Chiefland, FL 32626

    Registration requirements:

    Only children 12 years of age or younger are qualified.

    Parent or Legal Guardian’s current Government Issued Photo ID.

    Child’s Birth Certificate or Court Ordered Custody Records

    Child’s Social Security Card

    Proof of Residence (2 of 4, in registering guardian’s name)

    Driver’s License or Photo ID (with star indicating verified residence)

  • Fowlers Bluff Fire Board
  • Hornets flying in for CMHS homecoming

    After collecting back-to-back road wins to even its record, Chiefland returns to Wayne Pridgeon Stadium for homecoming this Friday, Oct. 13.

    The significance of the opponent likely won’t get lost in the festivities, however. Hawthorne, the Indians’ homecoming opponent, handed Chiefland a bitter loss last year, with players on both sides facing ejections for a scuffle during the game between teams.

    The Hornets, headed by former Florida Gator football and basketball standout Cornelius Ingram, jumped out to a 4-0 start this season before suffering their first loss to Union County (Lake Butler) last week in a 31-25 overtime clash.

    The Hornet offense, led by junior Kahleil Jackson, is a balanced attack, and the defense has recorded 35 tackles for losses.

    CMHS coach says Hawthorne’s success is bolstered by the improved strength of its offensive and defensive lines.

  • 2 men rescued from Gulf waters

    By Buster Thompson

    Being stranded in a boat on the Gulf of Mexico for 12 hours will be a fishing trip Charles Scott won’t soon forget.

    Scott and his brother-in-law Jerry Newsome, both in their late 60s, went out the morning of Sept. 29 to go grouper fishing, Scott said Tuesday.

    The Marion County residents launched Newsome’s boat from a ramp near Yankeetown in Levy County, pushing their 17’ Starcraft vessel 27 miles out into the Gulf.

    Several hours into their day, Scott and Newsome realized at about 2 p.m. they forgot to put oil in the boat, which would not start, marooning the pair without any way to contact their loved ones.

    “So we just sort of sat their,” Scott said about how him and Newsome anchored their boat.

    Scott’s wife, Wanda, said she expected her husband to call around 3 p.m. to say he was returning home. She never got that call.

    “I didn’t get anything and I was a little bit concerned,” Wanda Scott said. “The first two hours I was so frantic.”