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Today's News

  • Beast Feast coming Oct. 21

    The annual Levy County Schools Foundation Beast Feast is 6 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21, at the Etheridge Produce Farm in Williston.

    The annual fundraiser event features a variety of great food from clam chowder to “yard bird on a stick” prepared and served by cooks from local businesses and civic groups in a casual, picnic setting.

    The 2016 menu included gator, gumbo, fried frog legs and fried mullet fillets, wild hog chili, spicy creamed corn, “possum” (pork) ribs, clams from Cedar Key, cornbread and other wild delights.

    The evening includes door prizes and drawings.

    Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for students age 8-17. Tickets are on sale.

    Proceeds support Levy County School programs promoting student learning, effective teaching and scholarships for Levy County seniors.

    For more information please e-mail Donna Turner at lcsf@levyk12.org.

    Foundation Executive Director Donna Turner said after the 2016 Feast they were hoping for their normal number of 200 people. She had serving ware for 325 people and ran out of plates. That won't happen again.

  • Potential Levy ag project still moving forward

    An agriculture-based business that would be among the five largest employers in Levy County is still part of discussions for a site in Levy County.

    Dave Pieklik, of the Nature Coast Business Development Council, reported at the County Commission meeting on Oct. 3 that the speculative establishment, which he refers to as a large-scale, agricultural project, is still moving forward in site evaluation.

    “The site is perfect for the space, but there are obviously requirements like rail and electrical upgrades, and those things are being explored,” Pieklik said during his quarterly projects overview with the Board of County Commissioners. “We have every belief this is going to happen, it’s just a matter of at what point. It is very much on the horizon.”

  • Vickers discusses upcoming debut as Lady Indians hoops coach

    John “Buddy” Vickers, girls’ basketball coach at Chiefland High School, was the guest speaker Sept. 27 at the Chiefland Rotary Club.

    This is Vickers first year as head coach at CHMS after coming from a position as assistant coach at Trenton.

    Vickers has his work cut out for him as some of the stronger players from last year graduated, and not having had a JV team last year to recruit from, Vickers finds himself rebuilding the team. He plans to teach the fundamentals to as many girls as he can to provide a strong team now and in the future. Lacy Redd, Chiefland Elementary School principal, has agreed to let fifth graders play. Jason Whistler will coach that team.

    Vickers has been using the summer wisely. After tryouts came basketball camp.

    Vickers said, “Most of these girls do not even know the fundamentals. We have to teach how to dribble, how to pass, left side layups and right side layups.”

  • Crowning achievement

    A spirited week of homecoming week festivities – built around the theme of “Around the World” – culminated Friday Oct. 13 in Chiefland, as Chelsea Parker was crowned the 2017 Chiefland Middle High School Homecoming Queen during halftime of the football game.

    Upon the announcement, Parker embraced her father, Steve Parker, who escorted Chelsea and beamed with a tearful smile when his daughter’s name was called.

    Moments before, Haitrieu Nguyen was announced the 2017 CMHS Princess. Nguyen was escorted by her father, Mike Nguyen.

    Fellow Queen contestants included: Maclay Agnoli, who was escorted by her father Joe Agnoli; Tenlee Beauchamp, escorted by her father Jim Beauchamp; Erika Gilliam, escorted by her “Papa,” William Geiger Sr.; Maria Enriquez-Gomez, escorted by her mother Rosy; Jommielle Quiambao, escorted by her father Danilo Quiambao; and Alexis Seyez, escorted by her father Freddie Seyez.

  • Big plays doom Indians in homecoming against Hawthorne

    The Chiefland football team found itself in a 7-on-7 type of match against Hawthorne, and it didn’t go well.

    The Hornets struck on a pair of early touchdowns for at least 50 yards apiece, setting the tone for an offensive onslaught that found them leading by 34 by halftime.

    Hawthorne (5-1) went on to capture a 44-7 win, putting a damper on CMHS’ homecoming, and likely knocking the Indians from playoff contention.

    The Indians fell to 3-4. All four of their losses are to teams headed for the playoffs.

    Hawthorne’s only loss was in overtime against Union County (Lake Butler). UCHS is currently the favorite to take the fourth playoff spot in Region 1A-3. Top-ranked Madison County, Dixie County and Lafayette (Mayo) remain undefeated and are virtually guaranteed the other three playoff berths in Chiefland’s region. The Hornets are in Regional 1A-4 with Williston and Bronson.

    The Indians next play host to Bronson (0-6) Friday Oct. 20 for senior night. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.

  • Lady Indians take down Bronson in volleyball tournament opener

    For the first three sets of their District 1A-7 quarterfinal volleyball match, Chiefland and Bronson were about as closely-matched as two teams can be.

    Then the floodgates opened up for the Lady Indians’ offense, as No. 4 seed CMHS cruised to a 25-14 win in the fourth set against the fifth-seeded Lady Eagles in clinching a 3-1 win in Branford Oct. 16.

    The win advanced Chiefland to the district semifinal round Tuesday, where they faced Williston. At stake in that meeting were a fourth-straight playoff berth and an invitation to the district championship match Thursday Oct. 19. The match was played after the Citizen’s production deadline.

    (Update: Williston won in straight sets 26-24, 25-20, 25-18, versus Chiefland in the semifinals to advance to the district title match; it played Trenton Thursday Oct. 19.)

    Bronson won the first set 25-17 behind its power game, but Chiefland led with its defense in the ensuing pair of games to take a 2-1 lead off back-to-back 26-24 wins.

  • 14th Annual Christmas and Winter Festival in Chiefland

    The 14th Annual Christmas and Winter Festival in Chiefland starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 9, and continues through the day until 8 p.m. in the field on U.S. Highway 19 across from Train Depot Park at 23 SE Second Ave.

    Enjoy arts and crafts, food, children’s attractions, entertainment, free photo with Santa, Mrs. Claus and elves, pony rides and games.

    The Lighted Christmas Parade rolls down Main Street at 6 p.m. from Chiefland High School, then south on Highway 19 to SE Third Avenue. Parade viewing is from sidewalks alongside US 19 on the parade route. 

  • Songs of Christmas for the Williston Christmas parade

    Everyone who celebrates Christmas has a favorite song from the season.

    Maybe it’s O Holy Night or Winter Wonderland or Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer.

    This year the Williston Area Chamber of Commerce is giving those who participate in its parade a chance to show off their imaginations and creativity.

    This year’s parade kicks off at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 2 and is themed, “The Songs of Christmas.”

    Floats, walkers, musicians and all participants are encouraged to pick a theme and then have a lot of fun customizing your parade entry to your favorite Christmas song.

    The Chamber will award three trophies during the Light Up Williston festivities at the pavilion following the parade. Honors will be bestowed for Most Original, Best Depiction of Theme and Best in Show.

    Entrants will need to register at the Chamber to be in the parade beginning Oct. 9.

    For more information, call 352-528-5552 or visit www.willistonfl.com.

  • The math of quilting

    The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday, Oct. 5, at the Levy County Quilt Museum. Just as we were beginning to start on our projects, the electricity went off. We were hoping that meant the electricity was being added to the new RV Park on CR 120 behind Walmart. To us, RVers means quilters, which means new friends.

    Janie brought in several items like pencils and a protractor that we may need when we start working on templates for the Mohawk trail. Betcha didn’t know protractors were used in quilting. Quilting involves a lot of math especially if you’re creating your design or quilting pattern.

    Derick and the guys from Lancaster were out this week. They hadn’t been out for some time so they were busy with the yard and straighten up the porch. It was all Ailien and I could do to move the picnic tables to get ready for Hurricane Irma so we waited for the guys to return to get the porch back in order. There was no way we could lift the tables, it was all we could do to push/pull the tables where we wanted them to go. Thanks guys getting the yard and porch looking so nice.

  • Florida’s dwindling water supply needs conservation, regulatory reform

    Florida is facing a water supply crisis. Large portions of the state are deemed “Water Resource Caution Areas” (WRCAs). The Legislature has directed the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and regional Water Management Districts to identify “alternative water supply” sources, including reclaimed and reused water and even expensive desalinized seawater.

    How did Florida arrive at this critical point? The answer lies partly in the fact that water has always been thought of as plentiful, and free for the taking. We have a culture – and a regulatory system – that encourages permitting groundwater withdrawals for virtually any use from golf course irrigation to cattle ranching to subdivision development.

    Public water supply and agriculture are by far the largest water users statewide, according to DEP’s 2016 annual water supply planning report. With over 1,000 people a day moving to Florida, DEP expects public water consumption to reach 3 billion gallons per day (bgd) by 2035, while agricultural use will increase to 2.8 bgd.