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Today's News

  • Asbell assumes chairmanship on School Board; Etheridge picked as vice chairman

    Cameron Asbell was unanimously voted the new chairman of the School Board of Levy County Nov. 28.

    Rick Turner offered the nomination of Asbell.

    “Mr. Superintendent (Jeff Edison),” Turner said, “it is with honor and a great privilege I offer to you in the form of a nomination the most honorable and admirable Cameron Asbell to serve as chair of the Levy County School Board.”

    Asbell, who has served on the Board for eight years, represents Bronson on the Board, and also owns Cameron Asbell Insurance Agency in the town. He is a Bronson High School alumnus.

    Asbell succeed Chris Cowart (Cedar Key) in the position.

    “I can’t live up to it,” Asbell said jokingly of Turner’s nomination. “I want to thank Mr. Turner for that rousing introduction.

    “I also want to thank Mr. Cowart for an excellent job, and I hope I do half as good,” Asbell added. “It’s going to be a fun year. I promise to stay focused; ya’ll work with me.”

  • County extends moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries; seeks ban ordinance

    The Levy County Commission voted unanimously Nov. 21 to extend by three months its moratorium on medical marijuana dispensaries in unincorporated areas of the county.

    The motion for the extended moratorium was offered by Rock Meeks and seconded by Matt Brooks. It passed 5-0.

    The Board also offered a consensus opinion guiding county attorney Anne Bast Brown to craft an ordinance that bans dispensary facilities in unincorporated areas for the long term. Brown requested direction on constructing an ordinance as she advised that passing any further moratoriums would potentially test constitutional grounds.

    Brown put the question before the Board in bifurcated terms, with one part concerning medical marijuana dispensaries, where counties have more discretion, and the other dealing with the cultivation and processing of medical marijuana. She warned that if the county issued an across-the-board ban of the cultivation, processing and dispensing of medical marijuana in Levy County, it would be challenged in court and the county would lose.

  • Chiefland 11U football competes in national tournament in Daytona Beach

    Young Chiefland Indian football players experienced something like a working vacation over the Thanksgiving holiday.

    A collection of local 10- and 11-year-olds culled from a pair of Tri-County championship squads visited Daytona Beach for the National Youth Football Championships Nov. 23 and Nov. 24.

    The annual event pits youth teams from different states – and from various league brands – to compete for age-based division championships over the holiday weekend in and around Daytona Beach (Eastern Division) as well as Las Vegas, where the Western Division is hosted. The divisions are divided up by age groups.

    The Chiefland 11U team was making its debut in the prestigious tournament, and faced a daunting opener against a stout Maryland squad, on a chilly and rainy Thanksgiving morning.

    The Indians fell behind by a big margin early but gained some traction by the fourth quarter, eventually losing 32-6.

  • LCSO investigates Williston shooting

    On Friday, November 24th, 2017, at approximately 11:15 pm Levy County Deputies responded to 4011 NE 205th Avenue in Williston to Melvin and Alice’s BBQ in reference a shooting incident. Deputies arrived and discovered two individuals with gunshot wounds. One victim was driven by a bystander to a local hospital before being flown by ShandsCair with life threatening injuries. The second victim was transported by ambulance to a local trauma center. One victim is currently listed in critical condition; the other is listed in critical but stable condition.

    Levy County Sheriff’s Office Criminal Investigation Division responded and began their investigation. Investigators were able to identify a person of interest in the shooting. Investigators believe victims and suspect may have known each other. The shooting is believed to be in retaliation of prior altercation between the suspect and one of the victims.

  • Lady Eagle hoops led at guard

    While the Chiefland girls are led this year in the paint, the top returning talent for the Bronson Middle High School varsity girls’ basketball team is concentrated at the guard positions.

    Junior shooting guard Yelena Thomas is back after leading the Lady Eagles with 18.2 points a game her sophomore season, while her younger sister, Neomi Thomas, leads at point again.

    Yelena Thomas scored 33 points in a preseason loss to Williston Nov. 14.

    BMHS loses just one starter, Myia Knight, from last year’s squad, while junior Tamia Haynes and senior Taeya Mayes provide key returning experience with the Thomas siblings. Freshman Keyera Hutto joins the fray as an up-and-coming guard.

    The Bronson girls, who are led by Rodney Thomas, open at home Nov. 28 against Gainesville St. Francis, and are home again Nov. 30 versus Gainesville Eastside.

    Trenton figures to be the team to beat in Bronson’s district, as the Lady Tigers come off a regional finals appearance, and a state finals appearance the previous year.

  • Fall frosh

    The bats swing year-round these days, whether it’s high school travel ball, off-season training leagues or even the most elite pros sharpening their skills in Arizona.

    It’s no different for the bevy of talent that the Chiefland Middle High School softball program has exported the last couple of years, as five players from last year’s Lady Indians club recently got their first taste of college ball.

    At the University of Florida’s Katie Seashole Pressly Stadium Friday Nov. 17, around 45 Chiefland faithful were in attendance to welcome Jacksonville University freshman catcher Emily Hallman, a four-year standout for the Lady Indians, who was part of three state championships and another state finals club.

    The Gators, who boast three NCAA championship appearances and two national championships over the past four years, were led in the circle by reigning Collegiate Player of the Year Kelly Barnhill. The exhibition games are set for 10 innings. Stats and results are not official.

  • SGA raises big money on tasty sweets

    Chiefland Middle High School’s 26th Annual Cake and Pie Auction had to overcome a slight snag.

    Its hosts proved up to the challenge, however, as SGA co-vice president Maddilyn Johnson, in her first time in the role, handled auctioneering duties admirably for the first half of the event, before her father, the evening’s professional auctioneer, Chad “Cracker” Johnson, arrived from out of town to take over and hold court.

    The ultimate goal of the night, Nov. 16, was a success too, as the SGA raised over $4,000 on 36 pies and cakes, just in time to add some holiday sweets to local Thanksgiving tables. The treats took in an average of more than $100 per pie or cake. The fundraiser is the largest of the year for the SGA.

    “I’ve never done this before, and I don’t really like crowds, so bear with me,” Johnson said.

    In her introduction, SGA president Maria Gomez noted that the funds will go toward projects like raising money to combat children’s cancer, collecting items for soldiers overseas, and the SGA’s participation in the state convention and district retreat.

  • Top Eagles celebrated at BMHS fall banquet

    Bronson Middle High School went beyond its usual football banquet to include cheerleaders, band members and JROTC, and even recognized a group of special seniors who will see their names etched along the Bronson Eagle Pride Walk for future generations to remember.

    School Board of Levy County member and Bronson alum Cameron Asbell played host for the evening in his Bronson orange blazer, as he extolled the virtues of Bronson Middle High School and let his school spirit fly high.

    “If you look around, this is where the leaders come from,” he started. “Other towns have other things, but the best high school, not only in this county, not only in this state, but in this entire country is right here, and you students are the best there are, and that comes from me.”

    The members of the JROTC, band, cheer squad and football team were introduced and given various recognitions.

  • CES second-grade students give thanks

    Laura Wilson’s Class

    What dose Thanksgiving mean to you? It means I get to see my family and I don’t see them that often- Miah

    What doses thanksgiving mean to you? Its about sering food and being kind- Franklin

    I am thankful that I have a mom and family- Angelena

    Thanksgiving is of sharing food- Duke?

    Meeting friends, family and kusins, having food and I feel inspired- Grant

    I am thankful for…… Thanksgiving because it is a celebration! We all come together to give praise to God- Juliana

    What does Thanksgiving mean to you, to be thankful. - Richard

    I am thankful for…… Thanksgiving all the dinners I get to eat for my uncle (fishhead???) and taking me to kill my first buck. For my uncle David who takes me hinting and Aunt Kristi. I am thankful for my dad and mom and brothers. And to you miss Wilson- Brandon

    I am thankful for……Dad, sister, Ailin, and mom- (Airin?)

  • Log Cabin Quilters

    The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday, Nov 16, at the Levy County Quilt Museum. We’ve reached the halfway part of the quilt in the frame except we’ve decided it needs a little more quilting. The circles and half circles will be getting quilted as well as the outside strips. As we roll the quilt back to the starting point, we’ll add the extra quilting.

    Ann brought in her latest quilt top; a star variation. Thanks for sharing it with us. It’s very pretty.

    Derick and the guys from Lancaster were out. The shelves in the storage room are finished so now it’s time for us to fill the shelves. We’re finding several more boxes of fabric to measure and put out so be sure to drop by one day. Thanks Lancaster.