Today's News

  • Lady Indians cap exhaustive holiday slate with upset win

    The Chiefland girls’ basketball played 18 quarters of holiday tournament basketball on the road in three days, starting Dec. 19.

    After slogging through a pair of closely-fought overtime losses in Cedar Key, as well as a hard-fought win over Branford on the island, the Lady Indians capped their holiday slate with a one-off exhibition tilt against Providence School (Jacksonville) in the Trenton SAMCO Christmas Classic Dec. 21.

    They shook off the fatigue to score an impressive triumph over the Stallions, as Naja Martin (12 points), Colby Reed (11 points) and Sierra Norris (nine points) combined for 32 points to help CMHS fend off Providence for a 39-34 win.

    Chiefland connected on eight field goals in the second quarter to jump ahead 22-11 by the break. CMHS enjoyed a mix of buckets in the frame, including a mid-range pull-up basket and floater from Reed, multiple layups off drives from Norris, and a couple of put-backs from Martin. Courtney Hayes was also heavily involved as a key rebounder and defender for Chiefland, adding a steal and layup in the period.

  • Lady Indians get workout in Cedar Key tournament

    By the end of its two-day, three-game run in the second Drummond Bank CKS Beach Ball Holiday Tournament Dec. 19 and Dec. 20, the Chiefland girls’ basketball squad was a tired bunch.

    The Lady Indians ended up playing 14 quarters in the two days, with two of their games going into overtime. Still, they ended up nearly capturing third place, and were on the cusp of competing in the championship game, if not for a tiebreaker technicality that left them playing in the third place consolation matchup.

    In that final game against Keystone Heights, a 33-30 overtime loss for Chiefland, the points were scarce in the early going, with CMHS leading just 4-2 at the end of the first quarter.

    As the buckets added up, the margin remained airtight, as the biggest lead by either team in the second half came on the heels of a dribble-drive by Sierra Norris that put the Lady Indians up 16-13.

  • Strong start not enough for CMHS boys against Union County

    Chiefland boys’ basketball home matchup against Union County Dec. 19 was a game of ups and downs for the Indians.

    The squad looked as sharp as it has all year handling the Tiges’ press, but failed to convert enough to reap the rewards. Chiefland would see UCHS build up multiple 11 points leads, before chopping them down to more manageable five-point margins, eventually surrendering 63-52.

    Union County improved to 3-6 behind the win, a misleading record for the Tigers, as they share a district with Williston and 1A powerhouse Hawthorne, and have a couple of district losses by four and two points. It marked the third straight loss for the Indians, who later rebounded with a win over Cedar Key in Trenton’s Christmas tournament.

    Chiefland struggled at the foul line, at 13 for 29, and didn’t get any help from beyond the arc, where it went 1 for 9 as a team.

    Sophomore Jarrett Jerrels paced the Indians with 12 points, while fellow sophomore Jalen Rutledge joined him in double figures with 11 points. Junior Kirk Williams had a trio of buckets in the third quarter to help himself to eight points on the night.

  • Bronson Elementary soars

    Bronson Elementary School initiated a data-driven approach six years ago to help the faculty identify the individual needs of each student. The plan included implementing a digital assessment and instruction program called i-Ready.

    Purchased through the schools’ Title 1 funds, principal Cheryl Beauchamp explained the program was initially purchased to help students with their math needs, but realizing how powerful it was, they also purchased the reading program. The diagnostic assessment has individualized lesson paths, based on the students performance on the diagnostic, so every student has an individual path for instruction in that program, explained reading coach Melinda Chemin.

    Bronson Elementary was the only school that had the i-Ready program for the first three years. Catching the Levy County School Board’s attention by continually climbing scores, the school system now uses district Title 1 funds to purchase the program for the entire county.

  • Holiday scams are aplenty

    Your telephone rings, depending on your set up, you most likely have caller ID. All cell phones do, and newer home phones now carry the caller ID feature. Unfortunately, if you have an older land line, you may not be able to see who's calling you. In the past, the caller ID feature was the way to know who was on the other end of the line. Oh, how things have changed, and not in a good way. The call coming in may show you a call coming from within your area code, even a number from the next town over, so you answer the call. The call and caller as it turns out are from outside the country. How can this be you ask? It's called spoofing, and it's legal.

    Spoofing is the process of changing the caller ID to any number other than the calling number. As the number changes, so does the readout on the caller ID from where the caller is calling from. Anti-spoofing bills have been introduced in Congress, H.R. 2669 (114th): Anti-Spoofing Act of 2016, and was even passed through the House of Representatives last year - but was never passed by the Senate.

  • Tiny wasps pack a punch

    Citrus greening has hit North Central Florida and the residents now have a weapon to fight back: the Tamarixia Wasp.

    Citrus greening causes blotchy mottled leaves and it changes the flavor in your harvests. Huanglongbing (HLB), more commonly known as citrus greening is thought to be caused by a particular strain of bacteria called, Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus. Citrus greening symptoms include pointed leaves on new leaf growth, described as “rabbit ears,” blotchy mottle leaves, leaf drop, reduced fruit size, bitter tasting fruit, poorly colored fruit, lopsided fruit with curved columella (column-like structures), yellow stain at base of fruit and excessive fruit drop.

  • Grant supports efforts to extend mental health services in Levy

    There are efforts underway to bring a mental health court to Levy County, and a new grant approved by the county will support fact-finding and organizing that could help lead to its realization.

    At the Levy County Commission meeting Dec. 19, the Board approved 4-1 to offer a letter in support of a Department of Children and Families (DCF) planning grant that would assign an individual to determine mental health needs in the county for inmates. The program is ultimately aimed at improving jail diversion efforts through mental health treatment.

    Leah Compton, Vice President of Forensic Services at Meridian Behavioral Healthcare, went before the commission to request the grant endorsement. DCF requires that subjected counties offer their approval for the grant. The planning grant and its resulting process is required before a county can be eligible for an implementation grant that would fund more mental health services.

  • Williston site approved for RV park

    A 180-acre site located on the southeastern edge of Williston has been approved by the county for use by a prospective RV park.

    Jose Morales’ requests for the site, which included changes to part of the property’s land-use designations, a rezoning as well as a special exception that is required by all prospective RV park sites, were approved unanimously by the Levy County Commission Dec. 19.

    Public hearings were at the meeting before the adoption of the ordinances, and no objections were raised.

    The amendment to the county’s Comprehensive Plan required the county to earlier submit a petition to the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, while other state agencies also screened the request. The agencies approved the change with no comment on the changes.

    The RV park would receive water and sewer services from the City of Williston. Williston submitted a letter to the County Commission expressing its approval of the venture, while noting its capacity to serve the project’s utilities.

  • Indians pull away from Sharks in second half

    In their two meetings with Chiefland this season, the Cedar Key boys’ basketball team has run into an Indian shooter who was red hot from beyond the arc.

    In their first game, CMHS sophomore Ty Corbin lit up the gym with six 3s to help lift his squad past the Sharks in overtime. In the SAMCO Classic Christmas Tournament in the Dec. 21, it was Payne Parnell’s turn.

    Parnell, in his third outing since returning from a high ankle sprain that had him sidelined since the beginning of the season, connected on a quartet of 3-pointers, including three in the fourth quarter, to help ice Chiefland’s 63-44 win.

    “I felt like (my shot) was going to come back,” said Parnell, who scored a team-high 17 points. “We had the ball movement today against the press and had a lot better looks than we’ve had. We played together as a team.”

    Though the team’s share a district, the game doesn’t count towards the standings because it’s a holiday tournament game. They’ll meet again Jan. 2 in Cedar Key.

  • Football players, cheerleaders recognized at Chiefland banquet

    Adam Gore, the head football coach at Chiefland Middle High School, was aware he had a young team this past season.

    But it wasn’t clear just how new it was until, after combing through the roster for first-year lettermen, he realized there wouldn’t be enough C letters on order to be handed out Dec. 15 at the CMHS Football and Cheer Banquet Dec. 15.

    “We had about 26 (first-year lettermen),” said Gore, who assured everyone would eventually receive their C’s. “We weren’t ready for that.”

    In the end, the cafeteria stage at Chiefland Elementary School was nearly too short to accommodate them as flooded the stage.

    The number of superlatives handed out to sophomores bodes well for the program’s future.