Today's News

  • Veterans Night at the ballpark

    Note: The Veterans Night game has been moved to March 22 due to concerns over cold weather. CMHS baseball and the Interact Club apologize for any inconvenience.

    The Chiefland High School Interact Club would like to invite all veterans to the Williston-Chiefland baseball game at Chiefland High Baseball Field Thursday, March 22. The game starts at 7 p.m., and veterans are encouraged to show up before 6:30 p.m. for a special pre-game recognition. Admission is FREE for veterans. Any veteran interested in the event can call Chiefland Middle High School at (352) 493-6000.

  • City approves grant application for police cars

    By C.L. Watson, Citizen Correspondent

    Tri County Community Resource Center Director Beverly Goodman requested the city donate use of the Tommy Usher Pineland Center for an event with chef Laura Fowler Goss.

    The event is a parent and child cooking class instructed by Goss March 21 from 10 a.m. to noon. Commissioner Teresa Barron made the motion to donate use of the center. Commissioner Donald Lawrence seconded. The motion was unanimously approved.

    City Manager Mary Ellzey presented the USDA Community Facility Grant for purchase of four police vehicles. In October 2017, the commission gave approval to file the application for the 4-to-1 matching grant. The USDA would pay $140,595 and the cost to the city would be $46,865 for four new Chevy Tahoes. Lawrence made the motion that was seconded by Barron and unanimously approved.

    Police Chief Scott Anderson informed commissioners that police officers would soon need their body cams replaced and the wireless printers in eight patrol units needed updating.

  • Local students to remain seated

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    The Feb. 14 Parkland school shooting impacted students across the nation after a former student entered Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, pulled a fire drill and began shooting and killing 14 students and three staff members.

    The shooting prompted students and adults across the United States to take actions in an attempt to influence Congress to change the current policies regarding semi-automatic weapons.

    Levy School Board Member Chris Cowart said in an interview about the current safety issues facing the schools.

    “We have to have common ground. There has to be a way all of our agencies, whether it be the sheriff’s department or the Florida Department of Children and Families, can filter information so this doesn’t happen again. So many warning signs were overlooked,” he said. In addition, he said, “the School Board is working on getting one school resource officer per school.”

  • CK open house educates on a range of environmental topics

    The Florida Department of Environmental Protection’s open house Feb. 22, held at the UF/IFAS Nature Coast Biological Station, was a chance for residents to learn about the purpose and history behind the environmental regulations and restoration efforts that affect Cedar Key and the surrounding area.

    And while environmental regulations might not sound like sexiest of topics, the morning and midday event was a hit by all accounts, with around 80 attendees, proving again that Cedar Key citizen are passionate about its ecological standing.

    The open house presented an arrangement of stations, where, joining the DEP, there were representatives from UF/IFAS, Levy County’s Solid Waste department, an Ocala-based waste and recycling company, and Florida’s Aquatic Preserves, which, like the Florida Park Service, falls under the umbrella of the DEP.

  • CareerSource opens new office

    By Lori Prevatt, Citizen Correspondent

    CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion staff cut the ribbon and held an open house Feb. 22 at its new center at 2175 NW 11th Dr., in the Walmart Supercenter (Suwanee Plaza) off North Young Boulevard.

    The Levy County Career Center opened to the public in December 2017 to better serve businesses and candidates. The office was formerly located at the Old Post Office located behind the Levy County Tax Collector's Office.

    About 30 guests were present for the Chamber of Commerce ribbon cutting ceremony at noon. Among the guests were business participants that collaborate with the CareerSource employees, CareerSource board members and Chiefland Chamber of Commerce members.

    CareerSource staff all agree that moving to the new location will be greatly beneficial for the community. Moving to the center location makes career services more accessible to the public.

    “We moved to a more central location because the college is down the road and this is a much better place to provide services to residents,” said CEO of the Career Source Center Rusty Skinner Jr.

  • Fanning Chamber plans egg hunt

    By Kate Sheridan, Citizen Correspondent

    Fanning Springs Annual Eggstavaganza was the main subject discussed at the recent Fanning Springs Chamber of Commerce meeting.

    The annual Easter egg hunt and ski show takes place March 24 at Fanning Springs Park. The event will run from noon until 4 p.m. with the ski show starting at 3 p.m. There will be more than 6,000 filled Easter eggs for children to hunt. All age groups will be divided into four groups to ensure a fun hunt.

    In addition to hunting eggs, the Chamber will also offer more than 50 different raffles offered for free to all participating children. The day will include face painting, balloon art, music and many other surprises and activities.

    Food and drinks will be available for purchase but picnic lunches with drinks are allowable.

    BYOB (Bring Your Own Basket) and come out Saturday, March 24, for a great day with friends and family.

  • I love spring, pollen

    I love spring.

    The other seasons are OK, but spring is — as Muhammad Ali described himself — the greatest.

    I like the boiling heat of summer. We always joked in Oklahoma and Texas that it was so hot you could fry an egg on the sidewalk, but I’ll bet in Florida that you could boil an egg in the Gulf. I wish the Watermelon Festival was in a cooler month. I guess it would be if melons were a winter crop.

    I couldn’t tell much difference between summer and fall during my one full year here in the Sunshine State. I didn’t like winter too much. It was much colder than I thought it would be, but it wasn’t as rainy as I imagined. Also, deer come out during the wintertime and stand alongside roads; staring, daring. At night, they’re hard to see with flat dull coats; they give me the creeps; ghosts with big eyes glowing red in my lights. Deer along the roadside instill fear in me until I pass it by. Then, dread starts to build again and I pray I’ll see the next one in my headlights.

  • Citizen Viewpoint: Kudos to Levy County Animal Control

    Levy County Animal Services takes a small step forward in Levy County.

    We want to recognize the efforts of Levy County Animal Control for the new efforts to curb the number of unwanted animals in Levy County. The county recently launched a feral cat sterilization program. In this new plan, the county will provide traps to be used by residents to trap feral cats, so they can be brought to the animal control offices to be spayed or neutered.

    While the problem of unwanted pets is a challenge for many communities, we must take a more responsible approach. We as a community should recognize this first step of many needed improvements in how we treat our pets.

    The Levy County Animal Services always receives criticism for whatever they do. We know and understand the role they have. It is easy to be a critic. While we don’t know or are in a position to criticize or compliment their work, we all need to recognize the importance of their work.

  • A few tips for driving under the influence

    I’ve been thinking about this for awhile now, but never seemed to get around to writing anything about it. But, while going through the police reports, I was reminded again that it takes someone unlike me to be a police officer.

    Police officers see good people at their absolute worst and — they also see bad people at their absolute worst. Fortunately, most bad people who commit criminal acts are either really dumb or careless and get caught sooner than later.

    To help those who have a propensity to break the law, I have come up with a few tips that might help you stay out of trouble.

    First tip: Anyone who is under the influence of alcohol or drugs should always perform a complete vehicle inspection before driving through Chiefland.

    Second: Highway 19 is wide and there is absolutely no reason to cross a yellow line into oncoming traffic unless you’re high.

    Third: You’re still high if you think you can speed through Chiefland.

  • Indian bats come up short in rivalry tilt

    With just two regular season games under its belt heading into a road game against Lafayette March 6, the Chiefland baseball team has been solid in two of the three major phases of the game.

    Unfortunately, the bats had yet to follow the example of the Indians’ strong pitching and defense.

    In a repeat of its score at Williston in the season opener, CMHS fell 3-1 to Trenton Feb. 27, dropping the club to 0-2.

    Kelby Osteen and Wyatt Hammond combined to allow just three hits against the Tigers on the mound, while the Chiefland defense, for the second game in a row, committed only one error.

    Osteen made it through five innings as the starter, surrendering two earned runs and five walks while fanning four batters. Hammond tossed a pair of frames in relief, yielding one hit, no runs and no walks, and collecting a pair of strikeouts.

    Keegan McLelland drove in Seth Thomas on an RBI double for a 1-0 Chiefland lead in the first. Thomas and McLelland, who have hit safely in both regular season games, accounted for the only CMHS hits.