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Today's News

  • Fanning Springs firefighter resigns

    A Fanning Springs firefighter resigned after failing a blood-alcohol test at the scene of a fatal fire in Levy County. The identity of the victim has not been released.

    Fanning Springs Fire Chief Roy Bass said Mark James, deputy chief of operations at the volunteer fire department voluntarily resigned Sunday on the scene of the fire after recording a .22 blood-alcohol content.

    According to a press release from Chiefland Fire Rescue Capt. Daniel Morgan, Chiefland, Fanning Springs and Levy County Department of Public Safety Medical Units were dispatched at 2:11 a.m. to 7191 NW 95th St. to a reported mobile home fire. Once on the scene, it was found to be a fully-involved recreational vehicle.

    LCSO Dep. John Finkell stated in an incident report that Fanning Springs firefighters Mark James and Jennifer Poppell appeared to be intoxicated. Poppell was having difficulty standing and walking in a straight line, according to the report. After observation, the decision was made to pull her from the scene and make her stay away due to safety concerns.

  • CMHS' Hudson recognized for perfect test score

    Seventeen Levy students were recognized Oct. 10 by the School Board of Levy County for scoring perfect scores on individual state assessments tests last spring.

    Reagan Hudson represented Chiefland Middle High School among the group for her perfect mark on the End-of-Course Assessment in tenth-grade Biology.

    “It’s an honor to present to you Reagan Hudson,” CMHS principal Dennis Webber said. “We’re excited for the accomplishments that have been made in her life.”

    Bronson Elementary School saw five of its students presented perfect-score certificates by BES principal Cheryl Beauchamp, including: Coltan Bridges, Kristopher Lowe; Justice Phillips; Mina Zino and Douglas Tatham.

    Cedar Key principal Joshua Slemp presented to Lane Forney for his accomplishment on the Florida Standards Assessment in sixth-grade Mathematics.

    “This is a great thing for this young man, our only perfect score,” Slemp said.

    Angela Porras scored perfect on her eighth-grade science assessment at Nature Coast Middle School in Chiefland.

  • CES campus named after pioneering Levy family

    The Chiefland Elementary School campus has a new name to honor a pioneering family of Chiefland, one that’s been integral to Levy County education.

    The School Board of Levy County voted 5-0 at a public hearing Oct. 10 to establish the Helen Hiers Usher Campus, in tribute to the late Etter Usher and Helen Hiers Usher.

    Superintendent Jeff Edison said the name was proposed by citizens, eventually leading to a School Advisory Council (SAC) meeting where community members, school officials, educators and parents discussed the contributions of the late couple. Etter died in 2015, and Helen passed in 2016.

    “Those that were new to the area (at the SAC meeting) were thrilled to learn the history (behind the Ushers), about their donation of the land for Chiefland Elementary,” said Paige Brookins, who represents Chiefland on the School Board. “(SAC attendees) were thrilled to name (the campus) after Mr. Etter and Ms. Helen.”

    Brookins said family members of the Ushers, including daughters Lynetta Usher Griner and Karen Usher White, were notably touched by the suggestion.

  • Big plays doom Indians in homecoming against Hawthorne

    The Chiefland football team found itself in a 7-on-7 type of match against Hawthorne, and it didn’t go well.

    The Hornets struck on a pair of early touchdowns for at least 50 yards apiece, setting the tone for an offensive onslaught that found them leading by 34 by halftime.

    Hawthorne (5-1) went on to capture a 44-7 win, putting a damper on CMHS’ homecoming, and likely knocking the Indians from playoff contention.

    The Indians fell to 3-4. All four of their losses are to teams headed for the playoffs.

    Hawthorne’s only loss was in overtime against Union County (Lake Butler). UCHS is currently the favorite to take the fourth playoff spot in Region 1A-3. Top-ranked Madison County, Dixie County and Lafayette (Mayo) remain undefeated and are virtually guaranteed the other three playoff berths in Chiefland’s region. The Hornets are in Regional 1A-4 with Williston and Bronson.

    The Indians next play host to Bronson (0-6) Friday Oct. 20 for senior night. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m.

  • Lady Indians take down Bronson in volleyball tournament opener

    For the first three sets of their District 1A-7 quarterfinal volleyball match, Chiefland and Bronson were about as closely-matched as two teams can be.

    Then the floodgates opened up for the Lady Indians’ offense, as No. 4 seed CMHS cruised to a 25-14 win in the fourth set against the fifth-seeded Lady Eagles in clinching a 3-1 win in Branford Oct. 16.

    The win advanced Chiefland to the district semifinal round Tuesday, where they faced Williston. At stake in that meeting were a fourth-straight playoff berth and an invitation to the district championship match Thursday Oct. 19. The match was played after the Citizen’s production deadline.

    (Update: Williston won in straight sets 26-24, 25-20, 25-18, versus Chiefland in the semifinals to advance to the district title match; it played Trenton Thursday Oct. 19.)

    Bronson won the first set 25-17 behind its power game, but Chiefland led with its defense in the ensuing pair of games to take a 2-1 lead off back-to-back 26-24 wins.

  • Channel, Drew lecture on climate change

    Retired Dr. James E. T. Channel, U.F. Department of Geological Sciences and UF/IFAS Levy County Extension Agent Anthony Drew gave a  climate change presentation to 47 people Sept. 22 at the Levy Levy County Agricultural Extension Service office in Bronson.

    Channel presented the facts of climate change that are supported by documented geological evidence. The potential impact on agriculture and horticulture, in general, was discussed.

    Levy County Extension Agent Anthony Drew asked the audience how many have planted dogwood trees recently and how were those trees doing?

    The overwhelming response seemed to be that the trees are not doing well.

    According to Drew, the warmer temperatures in the atmosphere are to blame. It seems the trees are falling victim to global warming.

    Drew gave examples of what he called “anomalies” being witnessed in the plant kingdom. He then went on to introduce Dr. James E. Channell, his friend of several years.

    They met at a dinner party, and while the wives discussed tile colors the men started talking about their careers.

  • Former world-class sprinter coming to Chiefland

    The Suwannee Valley Rotary Club is hosting former world-class sprinter and motivational speaker Almon Gunter for a special program scheduled for noon Oct. 26 at the Haven Hospice Community Center. Gunter will share how he is working with Chiefland Middle/High School to build Indian Pride. Gunter uses his experiences and success on the track to help others reach their maximum velocity performance in the game of life. The cost is $10 per person, including lunch catered by Beef O’Brady’s.

    Almon Gunter is CEO and president of Almon Gunter Motivates Inc. He is a highly acclaimed motivational, inspirational public speaker, author, and consultant, as well as a former world-class sprinter in track. He is the author of three books: “Focus on the Final Seconds and Win the Game of Life,” a how-to book on achieving both mental and physical fitness success in life; “Focus To Win” analyzes personal traits needed to build a strong foundation for success and “The Essence of Teamwork” outlines the eight principles of a winning team. 

  • Bank teller arrested for grand theft

    Rachel Lynn Mobley was arrested Sept. 19 for grand theft of more than $5,000 and less than $10,000 after allegedly embezzling money from her cash drawer at Sun State Federal Credit Union where she was employed as a teller.

    In an incident report filed by Chiefland Police Officer Kyle Schultz, branch manager Carole Tucker stated that Mobley had been audited several times throughout the month and found a shortage of about $7,300 missing.

    According to the report, Tucker and other corporate leaders confronted Mobley and she confessed to systematically taking cash from her drawer for several months.

    Schultz stated that he read Mobley her rights, which she waived, and stated she had been taking money since August because she was having financial difficulties.

    Schultz stated Mobley was transported to the Levy County Detention Facility without incident.

  • Bad house guest

    The 240-mile round trip to Hilliard Oct. 7 might have been the longest road trek of the season for the Chiefland football team.

    But the Indians looked like they were right at home as they assembled their most dominating effort to prevail 33-0 over the Red Flashes (2-4), evening their record to 3-3 heading into homecoming week.

    CMHS took control early in all three major phases — offense, defense and special teams.

    The Indian defense took up camp in the Red Flashes’ offensive backfield, recording five tackles for losses on Hilliard’s first five plays from scrimmage.

    “Three-and-outs are the goal,” senior defensive tackle Dalton Tiner said of the team’s recent dominance on defense, which has led to back-to-back shutouts. “Once everybody gets it in their head, it’s just a steady flow.”

  • Chiefland Commission recognizes students of the month

    Arianah Boyd, Jarrett Darus and Nathalie Solatorio were recognized by members of the Chiefland City Commission as Students of the Month for September — the first such recognition for the 2017-18 school year.

    Chiefland Elementary School nominated by fifth-grader Arianah Boyd, daughter of Angela and Anthony Boyd. Her teacher, Celeste Green, said Arianah is a very organized fifth grader.

    “I made her my 'classroom manager’ the first week of school. She is a great role model for her peers. She is kind, respectful and extremely responsible,” Green said.

    Jarrett Darus was selected from Chiefland Middle High School. He is the son of Tommy and Heather Darus. The seventh-grader was nominated by all the seventh-grade teachers.