.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Are former Prisoners of War ever really free?

    I originally planned on writing something silly as I often do until I went to the Veterans Day luncheon Friday in the Haven Community Center. There are many things wrong with the United States of America, but there are many more things that are good and those good things far outweigh the bad.

    When the Pledge of Allegiance was spoken and the National Anthem was sung Friday, veterans with crooked backs, stood. Veterans in wheelchairs sat more erect and regardless of their condition, saluted, recited the pledge and then sung the anthem.

    The contrast between the men and women who sacrificed their health for their country and able-bodied professional football players was striking.

    I understand why they took a knee. Issues being ignored need to be addressed and talked about. However, we’re not talking about racism, police shootings, church shooting, school shootings, workplace shootings, black on black violence, white on white violence, black on white or white on black — we are only talking about the protest.

  • Haven hospice clarifies care center closing

    As the chairperson of the Haven Corporate Community Advisory Board, who resides in the Tri-County area, I wanted to clarify the events surrounding the recent, temporary closure of the Haven Tri-Counties Hospice Care Center.

    Haven has served the residents of the Tri-County area since 1979 and remains fully committed to serving the Tri-County area. Approximately 95 percent of the patients that Haven cares for receives hospice care in their homes, nursing homes, and assisted living facilities. This is at the request of the patients and their families and we strive to honor those wishes. The hospice field team will continue to serve these patients in their homes and ensure they receive the quality hospice care that Haven is known for.

    The hospice field team will continue to operate from the Haven administrative office located next to Care Center in Chiefland. If a patient needs care center placement, they will be able to access this level of care at either our Gainesville or Lake City care centers.

  • Williston to host Veterans Day Parade

    By Carolyn Ten Broeck, Williston Pioneer Editor

    Men and women from all walks of life representing every branch of military service will be the guests of honor Saturday, when the city of Williston hosts the annual Levy County Veterans Day Parade..

    Step-off is at 10 a.m. Nov. 11. More than 35 units have pre-registered to participate in the parade down Noble Avenue including floats, motorcycles and horse and buggies.

    Following the parade, everyone is encouraged to come to the Heritage Park Pavilion where Mayor R. Gerald Hethcoat's annual Veterans Day Program will take place.

    In addition to patriotic music, where all branches of the military are honored with their anthems, Williston City Council President Charles Goodman, a Vietnam veteran, will deliver the keynote address.

    Following the hour long ceremony, the city will serve hot dogs and chips to those in attendance.

    For more information, call Latricia Wright at 528-3060.

  • Former tank commander is Veterans Day speaker

    By David Davis and Carolyn Ten Broeck

    Men and women from all walks of life representing every branch of military service will be the guests of honor Saturday, when the city of Williston hosts the annual Levy County Veterans Day Parade.

    Step-off is at 10 a.m. Nov. 11. More than 35 units have pre-registered to participate in the parade down Noble Avenue including floats, motorcycles and horse and buggies.

    Following the parade, everyone is encouraged to come to the Heritage Park Pavilion where Mayor R. Gerald Hethcoat’s annual Veterans Day Program will take place.

    In addition to patriotic music, where all branches of the military are honored with their anthems, Williston City Council President Charles Goodman, a Vietnam veteran, will deliver the keynote address.

    At 17 years old, Goodman said he knew he was not going to college and facing certain draft, decided to join the Army rather than wait to be drafted.

    He was first trained at Ft. Benning, Georgia, then Fort Knox, Kentucky.

  • Veterans show respect for the flag

    Retired Army Maj. Jim Lampros spoke on the U.S. Flag Friday during the Veterans Day Luncheon in the Haven Community Building. The former officer said the subject was appropriate due to the recent disrespect shown the flag.

    “It’s upsetting to a lot of people. It’s upsetting to me and I’m sure it’s upsetting to all of you in this room,” he said. “It’s a flag that we fought for, that we defended, that represents so much to us — it’s incorrigible to me that somebody could do some of the things (they’ve done) and be so disrespectful.”

    Lampros said the flag was in a period of restoration from 1914 until 2008 at a cost of $7 million,” he said.

    The flag was tattered and torn from the British bombardment of Fort McHenry, some of the soldiers cut stars out of it as souvenirs, but as much of the original flag as possible was recovered and replaced during restoration.

  • World War II veterans meet

    By Kate Sheridan, Citizen Correspondent

    Local World War II veterans met for lunch recently at HoBo’s Restaurant in Trenton where they were met with warm greetings by other patrons and treated like gold by their server, Jessica, who doted over each one.

    The group meets once a month for lunch to enjoy each other’s company and conversations. The location varies as they are always looking for new venues. Most everyone brings a guest with them and everyone pays for their own meal. Some guests were spouses while others were friends, family or caregivers.

    Most everyone opted for the burgers which were the special of the day and offered several choices of sandwich combinations. The party size varies from month to month depending on everyone’s schedule. This month there were six veterans present, which was purported to be the most ever in attendance. Four were Navy and two were Army Air Corps.

    While enjoying their lunch the group was greeted by Tom Walter of Alliance Dairies who was moved to shake hands and speak to each one, expressing his gratitude for their service.

  • Chiefland misses playoffs with Levy Cup loss

    The Chiefland football team fell short of its highest goal – to reach the playoffs for the first time since 2004.

    The Indians fell victim to Williston’s defensive pressure last Friday, as they committed seven turnovers in their offensive backfield, most of which directly led to Red Devil scores, in falling 55-14 to their cross-county rivals.

    The loss boxed CMHS (5-5) out of the playoffs and handed the Levy County Cup to Williston (5-5) for the third-straight year. The Red Devils earned their first playoff bid since 2009 with the win. They face reigning Class 1A champions Pahokee in South Florida Friday Nov. 10. WMHS jumped ahead of a couple of 7-2 teams to qualify for the playoffs on the strength of their schedule under the new region-based, points structure, as it earned bonus points for facing eight recent playoff teams and made large gains in playing eight teams with winning records.

    Despite the disappointment, first-year coach Adam Gore wanted to make sure his senior class understood the legacy it’s leaving the program, that the better days ahead will be built on the foundation first laid by the current seniors.

  • The Children’s Table pantry aiming resources for Puerto Rico

    The Children’s Table, a Bronson-based food pantry founded by Verna and Bill Brown, is going outside of the area it usually serves.

    While it might be new territory, its newest mission is right in the organization’s wheelhouse, as it applies its organizational skills, its more than two decades of experience and its indefatigable giving spirit to serve those in need in striken Puerto Rico, which is suffering from the overwhelming devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria on Sept. 20.

    The Children’s Table this month is sending a 40-foot shipping container with food, clothes, medical items and other supplies to the island with a focus on rural and inland areas, with up to around 15 shipments planned if all goes well. It’s collaborating with area pastors and ministries with experience in providing relief to areas in crisis here and overseas. The network is working with a longtime nonprofit in Puerto Rico to help with oversight and local logistics to the subject areas. The supplies will be distributed by ministers and small rural churches.

  • County Commission honors longtime EMS employee, union president

    Paul Shear, a longtime employee of the Levy County Department of Public Safety, who witnessed the modernization of the department and represented his co-workers as union president, was presented a plaque on the occasion of his retirement by the Board of County Commissioners Nov. 7.

    “(Shear) has been a very dedicated employee for many years at the Department of Public Safety,” BOCC chair John Meeks said. “I appreciate his many years of service. I’d say he’s one of the good ones because he stuck around so long, but he’s one of the good ones because he’s seen our EMS grow from its very infancy all the way to what it is today. I hate to lose him, but I’m sure he’s ready to retire and go onto something else.”

    Shear was also praised by Board members for his dealings with the Board as the public union president.

    “I enjoyed working with you all through the years,” Commissioner Lilly Rooks said to Shear. “It was easy to sit down with you and talk everything out.”

  • CES celebrates busy week of festivities

    By Tonya Townsend

    It was a busy week at Chiefland Elementary School during National Red Ribbon Week.

    The theme was “Your Future is Key, So stay Drug Free!!"

    Students and staff participated in dress-up days to bring awareness to drug prevention. A poster contest was held for grades 3-5, and a coloring contest for PreK through second grade. A special thanks goes to staff members Cheryl Tindale and Lisa Campbell for heading up all the week’s activities.

    On Tuesday, the Chiefland Rotary Club, along with the Interact Club from Chiefland Middle High School, painted pinkies purple for polio awareness. Students paid one dollar to paint their pinkies purple. The money raised helped to pay for polio vaccines.