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Today's News

  • From racetrack to runway, Southard is the Queen

    Jessica Southard says she's not a pageant girl. She's an agricultural girl, definitely; a car racing girl, certainly. She's a graphic artist, too; until recently she designed many of the logos and scripts on the race cars built by her parents, Gary and Kathi Southard of Bronson's Southard Racing. How did she come to be crowned the 2009 Florida Watermelon Queen?

    “Years ago, my dad built a car for Buddy Hughes, who is one of the biggest watermelon growers in Newberry,” she says.

  • Chiefland girls can't close the door on P.K. Yonge

    Chiefland softball remains the only team to beat P.K. Yonge this season – in the district, and otherwise. Unfortunately, they couldn't make lightning strike twice. The Lady Indians traveled to Gainesville to try to slam the door on the series, but a pair of errors in the first inning let the Blue Wave score. The game was tied into the eighth inning when a bloop hit into shallow right let the P.K. baserunner go home, giving the Blue Wave the 3-2 win.

  • Diamond Indians clobber Bronson in Round Two

    Chiefland boys answered the challenge Friday against Bronson baseball, traveling to the water tower field to clobber the Eagles 19-3 in their own nest. Indians' head coach Kyle Parnell had been deprecating of Chiefland's home performance against Bronson back in March; the Indians rallied then to beat a better-looking Bronson team 9-7.

    “We were lucky to get a win,” Parnell said at the time.

    “Bronson should have beaten us.”

  • Cold night, hot action at Bronson Motor Speedway

    The roads were a little safer Saturday night after Rick Heath's Ford Pinto left the Four-Cylinder Bomber feature race on a flatbed wrecker. Heath climbed the retaining wall and rolled during the warmup lap leading into the feature. After being extracted from his car, he walked off the track.

  • Chiefland boys whip Newberry, set for Bronson

    Chiefland boys rolled over Newberry again for the second half of that district series. Unlike February's five-inning, 10-run game in 30-degree temperature, this time they took all seven innings to win 7-0; the weather was fine.

    “It always feels good to get a district win,” said Indians' Head Coach Kyle Parnell.

  • Fix the softball concession stand, already

    Chiefland softball is rocking 10-3 with only two district losses, and every home game is packed with fans from both sides. There's rowdiness and good cheer, enough to go around, but do you know what there isn't?

    Peanuts. M&Ms. Hot cocoa on a cold night and blue Powerade on a warm one. Hot dogs, Air Heads and pickles. Milky Ways. I'm miserable just thinking about it.

  • Spring Break with the manatees

    Guess who visited Manatee Springs and wrote the following report:

    "Having borrowed a canoe from some indians, I visited a very grat and most beautiful fountain or spring which boils up from between the hills about 300 yards from the river, throwing up great quantities of white small pieces of shells and white shell rock which, glittering through the limped eliment as they rise to the surface, subside and fall again round about on every side."

  • Ancient tale features beauty queen with smarts

    The Book of Esther tells the tale of how an orphan girl rises to power and saves her people from genocide. One of only three biblical books named for women - Ruth and Susanna being the other two - the Book of Esther has all the ingredients of a fairy tale: a beautiful heroine, a powerful king, an evil villain, intrigue, secrets, suspense, comeuppance, and a happy ending. The book touches on themes of gender roles, respect for and defiance of authority, fidelity to one’s own heritage, and selflessness.

  • Judge considering a motion to dismiss

    A lawsuit by A.D. “Andy” Andrews, landscape tree grower and publisher of the Levy County Journal, against the Chiefland Citizen is being considered for dismissal by Circuit Judge David O. Glant.

    Lawyers for both sides argued the merits of keeping the suit alive or dismissing it in Glant’s chambers on Monday morning,.

  • Lobbying the Legislature

    Daniel Rose brought a letter he had composed to Florida’s state legislators. David Estep quietly rehearsed his statement. On the bus trip to Tallahassee last Wednesday, they and 15 other mentally handicapped clients of Levy Association for Retarded Citizens prepared themselves to go to the state capitol and remind lawmakers that the economy was hitting them harder than almost anyone in Florida.

    “I’m concerned about these budget cuts,” said Estep.

    “I’m worried LARC might have to close its doors.”