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Today's News

  • Video: Sheriff's deputies will patrol flooded areas

     In an effort to deter looting at flooded homes and harm to boaters from debris on the Suwannee River during the current flooding, officials in Levy and Dixie counties have teamed up to close boat ramps along the river as of dusk Saturday, April 11.

    Officials in both counties, sheriff's offices in the two counties, and state Fish and Wildlife Commission officers have teamed up to conduct coordinated patrols on the flooded portions of the river to deter looting that has occurred with past flooding when homeowners had to evacuate their homes and belongings.

     

  • Reason to Relay

    Zachary Andrews says it was hunting that got him through. The Chiefland High School senior was a 15-year-old sophomore when he was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, and everything in his life changed.

    “I was out turkey hunting with my dad and I tripped and fell,” he said.

    “My dad asked me, ‘Why’d you fall down?’ and I told him my knee gave out.”

    Andrews’ left leg had been kind of weak and achy for about a month, he said.

  • Bible is key for understanding literature, culture, self

    Bring up the importance of the Bible and two reactions are common: unquestioning zeal for God’s literal word, and anger. Both reactions stem from defensive points of view: defense of the faith; and defense of the self from those eager to impose belief.

    I would like to offer an alternative that has nothing to do with arguments about faith or truth.

    The Bible is important because its proverbs, its stories and its mythologies underpin art and literature in Western Civilization.

  • The call was issued and you are answering

    Lubcho Michevski is not as alone as he thinks he is.

    Less than 24 hours after my column about his desire to return to his native Bulgaria appeared April 2, calls, e-mails, letters and money started showering my office at the Chiefland Citizen.

    The people of Levy County and the surrounding area, in fact, the world, felt compassion and many stepped up to the plate offering any help they could.

  • Boil Water Notice still in effect

     

    The Levy County Sheriff’s Office has received numerous phone calls from the Chiefland Country Club area with reports of yellow discoloration in the water. As a precaution we are asking the citizens in the area to boil water until further notice or drink bottle water. 

  • Flooding in Fowlers Bluff reaches homes

    The flood warning is still in effect and the Suwanee river is expected to crest on Tuesday, April 22.

  • County to lose 7 percent revenue

    Levy County’s assessed land value is expected to fall 7 percent in the coming year, meaning county government will take a $1.2 million hit in a budget that is already suffering from decreased revenues in the current year.

    County Coordinator Fred Moody told the commissioners that County Property Appraiser Oz Barker had informed his office that land values will be down by about 7 percent in the coming year.

  • Yearty, Parker trial delayed

    Suspended Levy County Commissioners W.S. “Sammy” Yearty and Robert Anthony “Tony” Parker have won a delay in their federal trial until June 1.

    Yearty and Parker, who were indicted in October, but not arrested until the indictments were unsealed after the November 2008 general election, are accused of conspiring to accept bribes in return for votes and influencing their fellow commissioners votes. Yearty has also been indicted on an additional charge of perjury.

  • Levy County citizens concerned about the environment joined residents of Alachua and Marion counties Mar 30 in Micanopy to strategize a response to the proposed state budget which reduces Florida Forever funding from the traditional amount of $12.4 million – leveraged to secure $300 million annually for land preservation – to $0 in the next fiscal year.

    The Florida Forever program focuses on purchasing land and land use rights to conserve and permanently protect land resources.

  • Reason to Relay

    It was St. Patrick’s Day, and he was 10 years old. Taylor Carey’s parents noticed he had been short of breath for some time, and he’d been complaining that his legs hurt.

    “My parents just thought it was growing pains but then they took me to the doctor,” Carey said.

    “He couldn’t figure it out right away. Then my mom remembered that when I was born, the doctor said something about a rare blood trait. They tested my blood and that was when they found it.”