Today's News

  • Volunteers, citizen supporters help power local parks

    The Chiefland Chamber of Commerce meeting Jan. 26 boasted an exceptional turnout, thanks to all of the volunteers and supporters for the local parks in attendance.

    With Manatee Springs State Park as the meeting co-sponsor, guest speaker Mark Abrizenski, the park manager for Manatee Springs and Fanning Springs State Park and the Nature Coast State Trail (NCST), took the opportunity to highlight the contributions of park volunteers and the Friends of Manatee Springs, Inc. And to illustrate that level of support, he invited those individuals – and the park rangers – whose work is so critical to the parks’ functioning.

    The Gathering Table co-sponsored the meeting and catered lunch.

    It was the first meeting with new Chamber president Dr. Bennitt Patterson at the helm, as well as the first with new executive director Joy Parker. More than 50 attendees filled the room at the Haven Hospice Community Center.

    Patterson announced the annual Citizen of the Year banquet, normally held in February, has been pushed back to April 21, adding that he hopes to build up the banquet attendance to past heights.

  • Full slate of constitutional proposals in pipeline

    The Florida Constitution Revision Commission (CRC), a group of 37 delegates charged with examining the Florida Constitution and filing amendment recommendations to go before voters this November, is only on its third edition in state history.

    The first CRC came in 1977-1978, and there has only been once since, in 1997-1998, as the Commission operates once every 20 years.

    But this cycle is figuring to be the most significant yet, as the Commission is currently weighing 103 amendment proposals.

    Stephanie Marchman, senior assistant attorney for the City of Gainesville, and representative for the Eighth Judicial Circuit to the Florida Bar’s Board of Governors, paid a visit to the meeting of the Suwannee Valley Rotary Club Jan. 11 to discuss the Florida Constitution and the CRC.

    Before addressing the CRC’s current business, she outlined the function of the Florida Constitution, noting its role in defining the structure of the state government and citizens’ state rights.

  • Whitehurst takes over as tourism director

    After recasting its advertisement for a new tourism director, with more of an emphasis on marketing, the county turned inward to find the candidate it was looking for.

    Tisha Whitehurst, the current grants coordinator for Levy County, was warmly welcomed at the County Commission meeting Jan. 23 as the new director of tourism. Whitehurst will remain the grants coordinator.

    “We’re just piling on, don’t worry about the mule or the wagon,” Commission chairman John Meeks said jokingly at the meeting of Whitehurst wearing multiple hats.

    The jobs are far from unrelated, however.

    As grants coordinator, Whitehurst also coordinated the county’s interests with regards to the RESTORE Act (Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States Act of 2012), a federal law that directs fines from BP and others responsible for the Gulf oil spill disaster of 2010 toward improving the ecosystems and economies of the Gulf communities.

  • County Commissioners quiz FDOT on trouble spots

    The Board of Levy County Commissioners argue that the county’s unique traffic patterns might be preventing the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) from properly measuring its worst traffic hazards along state highways.

    At the County Commission meeting Jan. 23, they voiced those concerns to Jeff Scott, the District Safety Program Engineer for the FDOT, who reported on recommendations from safety reviews concerning four potentially problem roadways along state roads in the county.

    The study process for each location, which were requested by the county, included collecting crash report data, conducting a field review by an engineer, providing a crash analysis and concluding with recommendations. The crash data was from 2012 to 2016.

    The two main areas of concern for the Commission in the report included: 1) the stretch of State Road 24 in front of the Bronson Speedway, extending to Andee Road, and 2) the intersections of State Road 45 (US 41) and County Roads 326 and 323 in Morriston.

  • Girls’ hoops tourney tips off Feb. 5 in Trenton

    The Chiefland girls (12-8) are the No. 3 seed in next week's District 1A-7 tournament in Trenton. They face Cedar Key Monday, Feb. 5, at 6. The Lady Indians defeated the Lady Sharks twice in the regular season, 39-31 and 55-43. The winner plays Thursday, Feb. 8, at 6 p.m. versus No. 2 seed Branford or No. 7-seeded Bell. Bronson kicks off the tournament at 4:30 Monday against Dixie County. The championship game will be held Feb. 9 at 7:30 p.m.

    District 1A-7 Girls’ Basketball Tournament in Trenton
    Monday, Feb. 5
    Game 1: No. 5 Dixie County Bears vs. No. 4 Bronson Eagles, 4:30 p.m.
    Game 2: No. 6 Cedar Key Sharks vs. No. 3 Chiefland Indians, 6 p.m.
    Game 3: No. 7 Bell Bulldogs vs. No. 2 Branford Buccaneers, 7:30 p.m.
    Thursday, Feb. 8
    Game 4: winner of Game 2 vs. winner of Game 3, 6 p.m.
    Game 5: No. 1 Trenton Tigers vs. winner of Game 1, 7:30 p.m.
    Friday, Feb. 9
    Championship game: winner of Game 4 vs. winner of Game 5, 7:30 p.m.

  • Lady Indians clip county foes

    It was supposed to be a rebuilding year for the Chiefland girls’ basketball team.

    The Lady Indians were tasked with adjusting to a world without do-it-all standout Takiya London, who helped lead the squad to four-straight playoff berths and a final four, while acclimating an inexperienced group of younger players under a new head coach in Buddy Vickers.

    While the program certainly is building for times ahead – Vickers likes to call it a five-year plan – the team hasn’t let this season become a forgettable sacrifice for the future, as Chiefland, with a pair of recent wins over county rivals Bronson and Williston, has guaranteed itself a winning season and heads into the district tournament as a No. 3 seed.

    On senior night Jan. 23, the Lady Indians cruised to a 52-22 win over Bronson, before knocking off the Lady Red Devils 50-35 on the road Jan. 29.

  • Chiefland dominates early in win against Bronson

    Chiefland strung together one of its more satisfying performances on the season against Bronson Jan. 23 to lead by as much as 23 points in the second half.

    It was senior night for the Indians, who don’t have a senior on the roster, making for an ironic subtext behind the proceedings.

    Bronson, showing its pride against its a chief rival, made a run in the fourth quarter, but CMHS had enough cushion to absorb the blow at that point, as it went on to prevail 63-58.

    Chiefland a well-rounded scoring distribution, with newcomer Quay Brodus leading the way with 15 points. Jarrett Jerrels jumped out with seven points in the opening quarter to finish with 11 on the night for CMHS; Ty Corbin (five rebounds) and Austin Adams chipped in 10 and nine points, respectively. Payne Parnell had seven points and four boards for Chiefland.

  • Indians surrender early lead to Oak Hall

    The Chiefland boys’ basketball team had its share of mini-surges in the second half against Oak Hall Jan. 26 in the CMHS gym.

    But the Indians could never completely shake the deficit they carried into the break, as they fell 68-63 to the Gainesville private school in what turned out to be a disappointing, for CMHS, but mostly thrilling final quarter of action.

    Chiefland was under serious threat early in the fourth quarter as the Eagles pulled ahead 50-37. But back-to-back dazzling plays by sophomore Ty Corbin, including a 3-pointer and a behind-the-back assist to Sedrik Moultrie, energized the crowd and made the deficit manageable once again at 50-42.

    When OHS responded with a couple of buckets, Chiefland junior Payne Parnell connected on a 3 to take it back to an eight-point game.

    From there, Oak Hall remained ahead by 8-12 points, until an Austin Adams steal and assist – to Quay Brodus – and another Corbin 3 cut the Eagle lead to 62-58 with 3:05 remaining. Adams later added a 3-pointer of his own, but the Indians were done for the night scoring from the floor thereafter.

  • The best present I ever bought my wife

    I struggled this last year to figure out what to get my wife for Christmas this year. I’m a good gift-giver and I started trying to look around in October. My birthday is in October so I’m usually thinking about gifts then.

    She didn’t drop any hints. If she did, I wasn’t listening until finally, I just came out and asked, “What do you want for Christmas?”

    “I want an Alexa,” she said.

    “I thought you said they were a waste of money and that you didn’t want one,” I queried.

    “I didn’t, but my sisters have one and they keep telling me how much fun they are having and all the things it will do,” she replied.

    I have to remember to thank her sisters for putting an Amazon Echo in her mind because it is absolutely the best gift I ever got her for myself.

  • Citizen of the Year wanted

    The Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce is seeking the names of people who made extraordinary effort in good citizenship in 2017. These are people who have changed things for the better, who perhaps are examples of selfless volunteer service.

    This special citizen may display a broad range of contribution and achievement or be an individual unsurpassed in commitment to provide for a particular cause. Considerations may include:

    Significant contribution to the well-being of the community through personal service; personal effort that has made a lasting, noteworthy, and positive difference; perception as a role model for good citizenship and volunteerism; inspiring personal attributes, such as versatility, perseverance, devotion, and diplomacy; contributions above and beyond those expected; sustained dedication to a cause or effort, or to community service; an exceptional or extraordinary history of achievement in local philanthropic endeavors; courage in overcoming extreme adversity; a selfless act of bravery or generosity or performing service without expectation of compensation or recognition.