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Today's News

  • Student Government to host 26th Annual Pie Auction

    The Chiefland Middle High School Student Government Association is holding its 26th Annual Pie Auction Thursday, Nov. 16, in the school cafeteria. The pie viewing starts at 5:30, followed by the auction at 6 p.m. It’s annually the organization’s biggest fundraiser of the year, so the SGA and CMHS appreciate your support through the event. All proceeds from the auction directly benefit the students and staff at CMHS through educational programs, supplies and school pride projects. A special thanks goes to Mr. Chad “Cracker” Johnson for serving as auctioneer.
     

  • Levy Cup, playoff spots at stake in Williston Friday

    This week’s rivalry showdown between Chiefland and Williston takes on a little more import than usual, as both teams are alive in the playoff hunt if they notch a win Friday in Williston.

    The new points system will require a final tally once the dust has settled on the season, but Chiefland looks to secure the final playoff berth in Region 1A-3 with a win, after Union County ran into a three-game skid to finish its season at 6-4.

    WMHS, meanwhile, needs a win to claim a playoff spot 1A-4.

    “That’s what you want, to go into the last week and have a shot at the playoffs,” said CMHS coach Adam Gore, who prefers a district system over the alternative playoff configurations. “We’re excited for the guys. Williston’s going to be ready to play, there’s a lot at stake.

    “I know this means a lot to the community – the Levy Cup is on the line. They’ve had it the last couple years, so we’d like to get it on this side of the county a little bit. We’re excited to have the opportunity to go play in the playoffs if we win.”

  • Firing on all cylinders

    When junior Kirk Williams took a bubble pass 74 yards for a touchdown on the game’s opening play, it was a harbinger of what was to come on Chiefland’s senior night.

    The Indians scored on six plays of 20 or more yards against Bronson, guaranteeing a memorable night for the seniors as CMHS prevailed 62-23.

    Chiefland evened its record back up to 4-4, while the Eagles, who offered a few fireworks of their own on offense, fell to 0-7.

    Sophomore quarterback Ty Corbin three for a trio of scores and ran for two more. In just one half of work, he completed four of his five passes – all of which for at least 20 yards – for 156 yards. Senior Brian Norris rushed for two TDs as he eclipsed the century mark in the first half with 104 yards on 12 rushes.

    In addition to Williams’ touchdown catch, sophomore Jalen Rutledge (20-yard TD), Payne Parnell (24-yard TD) and Norris (28-yard catch) hauled in long receptions from Corbin, as Chiefland unveiled its most complete version of its offense yet, and put an emphasis on speeding up its tempo.

  • Free speech under attack in America

    I am writing this article the evening before Mr. Richard Spencer is scheduled to address an audience at the Phillips Center on the U of F Campus in Gainesville. He is billed as a white nationalist according to virtually all local mass media sources. 

    Personally, I do not support any organization where race is a prerequisite to membership. Therefore, I do not support Mr. Spencer’s National Policy Institute. Wait a minute, where is the race element in the title NPI? According to Wikipedia, ‘’the National Policy Institute is a white supremacist think tank based in Alexandria Virginia.” If Mr. Spencer is a white supremacist I will have nothing to do with him as I don’t and will not have anything to do with any race based groups, but I am uncomfortable with the double standard that is becoming very common in today’s society. Can you imagine if someone organized a Gainesville White Professionals organization? 

  • Don’t talk politics!

    Have your parents, or has someone important to you, advised you “Don’t talk politics!?” It’s one of those heated topics where most everyone has his or her own opinion, and may see talking politics as a threat, or fuel for a likely argument. But what’s the downside of keeping quiet about your own political opinions? We’re already headed towards being a more and more divided country, with today’s problems and challenges, and with all the diversity this “melting-pot” nation presents us with. So it may feel natural to hold back on your ideas or opinions, to avoid controversy, or to avoid taking sides and further dividing the nation. And we’re supposed to be a nation “by the people, and for all the people.” If we avoid discussing opposing ideas, we are likely to become less tolerant of other points of view. To be a true democracy, shouldn’t we listen to all points of view, consider them thoughtfully, and make intelligent, informed decisions? When we stop communicating well, we can’t make truly informed or wise decisions.

  • Was it a UFO or an Air Force refueling operation?

    Between 1952 and 1969, the U.S. Air Force conducted a study of UFO sightings known as “Project Blue Book.”

    Project Blue Book goals were to scientifically analyze UFO data and to determine if UFOs were a national security threat. In those 17 years, more than 12,000 reported UFO sightings were analyzed. Most of the “UFOs” were explained away as known aircraft or naturally occurring phenomenon.

    The project ended in 1969, when it was concluded there was nothing anomalous or dangerous about the reported UFOs and that there was no evidence that any of the UFOs were in fact extraterrestrial, according to the history website Fold3.com.

    One sighting was reported on a late Sunday night at about 10 p.m. Oct. 30, 1955, in Williston by a police officer whose name was redacted from the report. The officer was 40 years old and had attained a fifth-grade education.

    The report noted the “Source gave much thought to each question and asked and seems fairly sure of his answers. In the opinion of the investigator, source was fairly reliable.”

  • CES students learn about forestry

    Usher Land and Timber, along with the Florida Forestry Service, sent three foresters to speak to fourth graders about Forestry Week. The students learned the importance of trees and their many uses. The foresters were Joe McKenzie Sr., Florida Forestry Service; Sean Gilbert, UF intern; and Eric Handley, forester, both with Usher Land and Timber.

  • Beck wins tiebreaker in Ladies Division at Rye Grass

    The 40th Annual Rye Grass Invitational Tournament held its ladies round Oct. 13 and Oct. 14, and added a Ladies Scramble for the first time in its history on the morning of the opening day (Oct. 12) at the Chiefland Golf and Country Club.

    Eighteen ladies participated and competed well in the first-time scramble. The lowest grossing team turned in a four-over-par 76, while the lowest net group fired a 67.

    The ladies division played its first round of the tournament the next day, with similarly competitive results, as they battled the humidity and gusty winds.

    Betty Beck and Terry Harris each shot a two-day low of 142, with Beck claiming the win on a tiebreaker; the decisive hole was Beck’s par on No. 17.

    Donna Schaffer narrowly trailed the pair with a 143 to finish third.
     

  • Mayes, Chemin voted BMHS homecoming royal couple

    Bronson Middle High School announced its Homecoming King and Queen Oct. 13 at halftime of its football game against Branford.

    Taeya Mayes was crowned the 2017 BMHS Homecoming Queen, and Caleb Chemin was announced as the 2017 King.

    Mayes was joined by fellow Queen contestants Brianna Quinn, Rebecca Rodgers and Diamond Sheffield. The remaining King contestants included Adam Abouzid, John Konstantis and Jarius Thomas.

    Noah Anderson and Naomi Baez were selected Homecoming Prince and Princess, respectively. The Prince and Princess are picked among the eighth-grade court at BMHS. Alana Goodman and Kayla Shannon were also on the Princess Court; Mahki Bostic and Jesse Williams joined Anderson on the Prince Court.

    The ninth-grade attendants were Zoe Stocco and Jeremy Collins. The tenth-grade attendants were Ashley Blatchford and Blayne Thomas. Aliya Haynes and Cole Langston represented the eleventh-grade attendants.

    2016 Queen and King Faith Hyde and Caleb Rice joined this year’s court for the ceremony.

  • CMHS flag corps claims best in class at Lecanto Invitational

    The Chiefland Middle High School flag corps took best in class at the first-ever Panther Pride Invitational Marching Band Festival at Lecanto High School in Citrus County. The Chiefland Marching Indians placed second in class in the band competition, which featured 11 schools in participation. The Marching Indians perform a routine of songs by Journey. Chiefland next performs Oct. 28 in Lake City at its Marching Performance Assessment.