Today's News

  • Christmas Golf Cart Parade returns to Old Town

    The 10th annual Christmas Golf Cart Parade will be Dec. 16 at 6:30 p.m. at the Turner Point Boat Ramp in Old Town. Santa and Mrs. Claus will be there with bags of candy for all the boys and girls. We invite everyone to decorate their golf carts and join

  • Motorcyclists ride 1,000 miles in 24 hours

    Three Chiefland men make an annual endurance ride on motorcycles to raise money and awareness of the needs of some long-term nursing home residents.

    Brad Groom and Bruce Bryant have donated about $9,000 in the past five years.

    Groom said that through their proud donors, the 2017 Iron Butt ride raised about $1,500 upon completing the Southeast 1,000. The two men created that route, which is not listed with the Iron Butt Association as a sanctioned ride.

    The money raised is split evenly between eight needy residents living in Tri-County area nursing homes. The residents of Ayers, Cross City, Tri-County and Williston nursing homes must be long-term residents truly in need of financial assistance as determined by either facility case managers or social workers. The Iron Butt team has no input on who receives the donations.

  • Goodale shooting update released

    The Florida Department of Law Enforcement released an update on the officer involved shooting death of Michael Wesley Goodale on Nov. 16 in Chiefland.

    Levy County Sheriff’s Public Affairs Officer Lt. Scott Tummond said, “At this point in the FDLE investigation, we were authorized to release this information related to the current and open FDLE investigation.”

    According to a press release from the sheriff’s office, “Three Levy County deputies responded to 7450 NW 110 St. in Chiefland to a reported domestic violence complaint with an armed subject. Deputies arrived and confronted Michael Wesley Goodale, 34, at the front door of this residence. Goodale was armed with two knives and refused to comply with all lawful orders given by deputies. Deputies deployed Tasers in an attempt to disarm Goodale, but the Tasers were ineffective. Goodale attacked our deputies, which forced them to use their agency issued handguns to stop this attack. Goodale was struck by two bullets fired by our deputies and did not survive his injuries. Two deputies sustained minor injuries during the altercation.”

  • Former CES custodian to plead guilty on 2 counts of voyeurism

    A former Chiefland Elementary School custodian arrested April 4 after a hidden camera was found in a staff restroom is expected to plead guilty Dec. 13 as part of a plea agreement.

    According to an open letter to CES staff and faculty from Andrea Muirhead of the Levy County State Attorney's Office, Perez will plead guilty to two counts of video voyeurism.

    The agreement calls for Perez to receive 18 months in prison followed by eight years probation. During his probationary period, Perez must write a letter of apology to the faculty and staff at Chiefland Elementary School, have no contact with CES faculty and staff or campus, enter and successfully complete sex offender counseling, perform 200 hours of community service within the first two years on probation, and possess no camera, video camera, or surveillance equipment unless the recording devices is manufactured as part of a smartphone or computer.

    There were no images of children in the seized videos though there were short, edited video clips of women using the bathroom. Some women were identifiable and some were not.

  • Still much work to be done to protect manatees

    Earlier this year, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service downgraded the West Indian manatee’s Endangered Species Act status from endangered to threatened.

    Although Save the Manatee Club believes that the species is endangered throughout a significant portion of its range, we are most concerned that downlisting will give the public and policymakers the impression that their work to protect the manatee is complete. Such an attitude risks undoing decades of effort and hard-won gains to conserve Florida’s treasured marine mammal and leaves us far from what is still needed to ensure the species’ recovery and long-term survival.

    Recent years have seen record manatee deaths from new and increasing threats, including extreme cold events, red tide outbreaks, and a still-unexplained unusual mortality event on the Indian River Lagoon. Last year, an unprecedented 104 manatees died from impacts with watercraft, and 2017 is closing in on yet another manatee watercraft mortality and injury record.

  • Pearl Harbor Day, does anyone care?

    Today is Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. Does anyone care?

    There are tons of written information, movies and historical information on the sneak attack perpetrated against the U.S. 7th Fleet and other military installations on the island of Oahu, Territory of Hawaii, on Dec. 7, 1941, by the Imperial Japanese Navy.

    It was a Sunday morning, much like this Sunday morning Dec. 3 at 7:50 a.m. as I try to put into words why remembering Pearl Harbor is so important these 76 years later. It is important for many reasons pertaining to national security, public policy, foreign affairs and many, many other governmental decisions. On that sleepy Sunday morning, the Japanese bombers from the “land of the rising sun” laid waste to the U.S. 7th Fleet and killed 2,403 Americans. That was the dawning of the era in which the United States became the dominant world power.

  • Lady Indians take their lumps against Trenton

    Buddy Vickers, the first-year Chiefland girls’ basketball coach, knew what his team was in for when it squared off against Trenton Dec. 1.

    Vickers previously worked in the program as it made a state finals appearance in 2016 and added another regional finals bid in 2017.

    The young Lady Indians may have been overmatched at this stage, but they didn’t make it easy for the Lady Tigers in the early going. Trenton eventually separated itself for a convincing 62-25 win.

    The TMHS win, combined with its 60-17 victory Dec. 4 against Cedar Key, helped the squad to a 4-0 start, and 3-0 in District 1A-7.

    CMHS headed into its Dec. 5 game at Dixie County at 1-2 overall, and 1-1 in district competition.

    “We ran out of steam,” Vickers said. “We played as good as we can play. It wasn’t for a lack of effort. I was proud of them.”

    Trenton had yet to make a field goal four minutes into the game, but then raced out to an 18-4 lead by the end of the opening quarter.

  • Chiefland surrenders early lead in tense rivalry clash versus Trenton

    While the inexperienced, but talented, Chiefland boys’ basketball team seeks its identity, you often get tantalizing glimpses of its most electrifying potential as well as its share of forgettable lows on any given night.

    Against Trenton Dec. 1, in a meeting that lived up to the best and worst of what that intense and exhausting rivalry has become, the Indians led with their best foot forward, storming out to a 15-0 lead, culminating in a Ty Corbin 3-pointer.

    But the Tigers took advantage of Chiefland’s less-than-consistent play for the remainder of the game, as the Indian offense went stagnant for long stretches. Trenton chipped away to lead by two at the half, following a buzzer-beating 3 by Jayce Gentry, and then narrowly clung to its advantage for the second half, eventually securing a 51-44 win in the district rivalry clash.

    Chiefland dropped to 1-2 (1-1 in District 1A-7) heading into its game at Dixie County Dec. 5. Trenton knocked off Cedar Key Dec. 4 to improve to 3-0 overall as well as in the district.

  • Hoops coach discusses life lessons from basketball

    At the Suwannee Valley Rotary Club meeting Nov. 30, guest speaker Buddy Vickers, the first-year head coach of the Chiefland Middle High School girls’ basketball team, was officially there to talk Lady Indian basketball.

    But it was the lessons one gains from basketball and athletics – discipline; learning how to work toward an achievement; losing the right way – that Vickers was really interested in relaying.

    “I’ll talk to you about basketball, but you know basketball in itself is not really that important,” he started. “But I think the things you learn from basketball, or any athletic endeavor, is important.”

    Vickers discussed the coaches who influenced him, including former Trenton and Bronson coach John Rowe.

    “You never know what’s going to influence you,” said Vickers, who was previously a middle school and JV coach at Trenton. “I never expected to be a coach. In fact, I expected to be in front of a judge. Coach Rowe, my dad, my wife, helped keep from getting there.”

  • Courthouse monument case dismissed in favor of County

    The lawsuit filed against Levy County by American Atheists, Inc., claiming a violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment and Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, was dismissed by in the U.S. District Court in Gainesville.

    The suit stems from the denial by the county of a local atheist group’s application to install a monument at the Levy County Courthouse, claiming it failed to meet guidelines. The county established guidelines in 2009 for the placing of monuments by local citizens and groups at the site.

    In 2010, a granite monument detailing the Ten Commandments, submitted by the Tri-County Pregnancy Center of Williston, was granted permission.

    Levy County, represented by Liberty Counsel, first filed a motion requesting a summary judgement over the summer, seeking a dismissal without trial.