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Local News

  • Fowlers Bluff fire department back in gear

    Fowlers Bluff will have its own fire department as long as it can show it's up to the job.

  • Andrews v Chiefland Citizen verdict reached

    A Levy County jury has rendered a unanimous verdict in the defamation lawsuit filed against the Chiefland Citizen, former editor Carolyn Risner Ten Broeck, and former publisher Dale Bowen by Andy Dennis Andrews, publisher of the Levy County Journal and Chiefland businessman.

    Details on the week-long jury trial and the verdict will be in the Thursday, Oct. 16, issue of the Chiefland Citizen.

  • Fire service agreement drama continues

    The Fowlers Bluff Volunteer Fire Department board will be getting a letter in a few days from Chiefland commissioners asking for the return of about $16,000.
    Commissioners voted 4-0 in favor of sending the letter, drafted by Vice-Mayor Teresa Barron, at Monday night’s meeting.  Mayor Teal Pomeroy was not in attendance.

  • Candidate forum draws big crowd

    More than 100 people turned out for the Cedar Key Lions Club Candidates Forum on Tuesday to hear the folks running for local and federal office pledge to be fiscal conservatives dedicated to downsizing government and government spending.
    Lions Club President Dale Register read the two questions the club members devised before opening the questioning to the audience, moderated the event and kept strict track of the time allotment for answers. Candidates were limited to 90 seconds.

  • Manatee Springs turtles strong despite decline of ecosystem, high nitrates

    Turtle populations at Manatee Springs State Park appear to be strong, according to a scientist contracting with the Florida Department of Environmental protection.
    “They’re the easiest of all reptiles to study,” herpetologist Eric Munscher said in a phone interview last week.  
    Adults, especially females, tend to use the same areas year after year, he explained.  It creates a higher likelihood of recapturing previously tagged animals.

  • Tourism has strong year

    When the Deepwater Horizon started spilling oil into the Gulf of Mexico you could almost feel the fear among folks in Cedar Key whose livings depend on tourism and seafood.
    While no oil has reached Levy County and seafood purveyors are battling to win back public confidence in the area's pristine products — most of which are shipped out of the area — tourism that is measured by heads in beds is doing fine.

  • SRWMD pays taxes

    Special to the Citizen

  • League releases guide to amendments on ballot

    The League of Women Voters of Florida is a non-partisan expert resource available to help explain the Amendments to voters.
    With six complex ballot amendments this year, along with some highly contested candidate races with national implications, it is imperative that Floridians understand their votes will have a major impact on our state's future.

  • County news briefs

    Paying their dues
    Levy County will again pay its dues to belong to the North Florida Economic Development Partnership. Pat O'Neal, Nature Coast Business Development Council director, said the dues are 5 cents per resident — $2,041 — for the year. While payment is not due, O'Neal said the Partnership did want a letter indicating the Levy County Commission's support for remaining in the organization.

  • Man doesn’t want Levy nuke plant as neighbor

    The environmental impact of the proposed nuclear plant in Levy County could hit Robert Smith hardest. Once it is built, Smith will live 6,800 feet behind the buildings that will house two nuclear reactors.
    “When you did a study of locations, why was Crystal River not suitable?” Smith asked on Sept. 23 at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission public meeting in Crystal River called to discuss the draft environmental impact statement for the construction project.