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Local News

  • Girl killed, family members injured in sturgeon strike

    A 5-year-old girl was killed and her mother and brother were injured by a leaping sturgeon while boating on the Suwannee River on Thursday, July 2, at 8:47 p.m., according to a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission release.

    She is the first fatality from a sturgeon collision on the Suwannee River. Earlier this year a 14-year-old girl was injured by a sturgeon on the Suwannee and the day after the fatal accident, two people were injured in a sturgeon collission on the Santa Fe River.

  • Assessments tentatively adopted

    The Levy County Commission adopted assessments for the coming year that call for property owners to pay the same rate they have for the past two years.

    With little fanfare they approved a fire assessment of $90 for residential parcels, an emergency medical services assessment of $119 for residences and a solid waste assessment of $25 per parcel. They also adopted a long list of road district assessments that vary based on the amount of work to be done maintaining and mowing.

  • County Commission Agenda for Tuesday, July 7

    AGENDA

    REGULAR MEETING

    July 7, 2015

    Call to Order Invocation Pledge to Flag

    Public Comments

    -Issues related to Agenda items

    -Complete public comment form and submit to clerk

    -State your full name and address

    -Discussion must be limited to a maximum of three (3) minutes per person

    Public Hearing

    Development - Bill Hammond, Director

  • Volunteers determined to clean up Fanning Springs

    Twenty-eight volunteers woke up early Saturday morning to show they care about the condition of one small town.

    Fifty bags of garbage were collected in Fanning Springs during a clean up led by Mayor Trip Lancaster. Council members Jane Nogaki and Ron Queen were also on the committee that coordinated the efforts, along with Rodger Nogaki.

    “We want to show citizens of Fanning Springs we care about this town,” Lancaster said. “We want to make this a better place to live for everyone.”

  • Meridian reports seeing more children

    The head of Meridian Behavioral Healthcare says her agency is seeing an increase in the number of patients in Levy County who are under age 5 and that 25 percent of the patients they treat are school-age.

    In addition, she said the agency has seen a 26 percent increase in the use of its service in the acute care programs – emergency screening, inpatient crisis stabilization and detox.

  • Moving on

    Levy County Commissioner Lilly Rooks, left, presents Mark Johnson with a plaque of appreciation for his 17 years with the county’s emergengy management department.

    Johnson is leaving as director of Emergency Management to take a job as an emergency planner for the Department of Health in Bronson, moving just a few blocks away.

  • Carol McQueen appointed to state committee

    Carol McQueen, Director of Levy County Visitors Bureau and Levy County Tourist Development Council has been appointed to Visit Florida’s Industry Relations Committee.

    “Representing Levy County on a state level allows me the opportunity to promote our rural area and to lobby for better ways to market our region," McQueen said.

  • County's finances in good shape

    The county's auditor Martha Garcia-Baker of Carr, Riggs & Ingram, told the Levy County Commission that its finances have been given the best grade possible but it needs to be aware that General Fund expenditures are more than General Fund revenues.

    However, the commission has no worries, Garcia-Baker said, because it has money in other funds that can be shifted to pay the bills, so the county is not running in the red. “We had the money to cover it,” said Commission Chair John Meeks of Bronson.

  • Chiefland turns corner for the better

    Chiefland City Manager Mary Ellzey brought good news to the Chiefland Rotary Club last week.

    She said the city has turned a corner on its finances and its future is looking better.

    Without dwelling the city’s financial squeeze two years ago and the loss of a bid for a hospital, she instead gave the Rotarians a positive picture of city operations and activities in the city.

    Ellzey. a longtime city employee, was tapped to be city manager in July 2014. She started out in the police department and has been with the city for more than 31 years.

  • Flying high again

    More than 100 people, including members of various military organizations turned out Saturday, June 27, for the installation of two flag poles at AMVETS Post 88 where two had been cut down a week earlier.

    Workers at the post came in on Sunday, June 21, to find that someone had cut down two of the five poles in front of the post between midnight and 7 a.m.