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Local News

  • Underground grow house found

    An elaborate underground pot-growing operation that even had its own 100 kilowatt electrical generator has been put out of business and two persons arrested by the Levy County Multi-Jurisdictional Task Force and the federal Drug Enforcement Administration.

  • Adult business ordinance should get final approval

    The City Commission has approved on first reading what is expected to be the final versions of two ordinances regulating adult entertainment businesses and expects to give final approval to them in late February.

  • BOCC split on landfill director’s authority

    BRONSON —The downsized Levy County Commission had its first dissenting vote when it decided by a 2-1 vote to give Solid Waste Department Director Benny Jerrels permission to sign off on Environmental Protection Agency documents.

    The commission, which normally acts on everything by unanimous vote, disagreed publicly during its regular meeting on Tuesday morning at the county courthouse. Even in the days before two commissioners were suspended after being indicted on federal charges of influence peddling the board rarely had a dissenting vote.

  • Bill Bennett appointed to Conservation Trust board

  • Do you want to help count people?

    The U.S. Census Bureau is looking for a few good people to work in the 2010 Census and at least one Chiefland official is hoping the count gets done accurately.

    Project and Finance Director Laurie Copeland says Chiefland’s population in the 2000 Census fell two people short of qualifying for more federal grant money.

    “We’re two recorded people between the 650,000 category and 700,000 category” for Community Development Block Grant, she said.

    “The federal government is using the 2000 data. . . and there is no way to change it.”

  • Small investment reaps millions in savings

    It’s the offer no one can refuse.

    Give me $651 in county money and I’ll give everyone in your county an average discount of 20 percent on their prescriptions.

    Heck, if their pets use medicines manufactured for human consumption, I’ll toss in a discount on their prescriptions, too.

    And those folks won’t have to pay a fee to get the discount.

    Levy County Commissioner Lillie Rooks said that’s just what happened.

  • Progress Energy open house draws crowd

    CRYSTAL RIVER — Residents swarmed the National Guard Armory in Crystal River Tuesday to look

     

    at maps of the potential routes of Progress Energy Florida’s new

    transmission lines.

    “We sent out about 6,000 letters in the whole area,” said Gail T. Simpson,

    manager, public policy and constituency relations for Progress Energy.

    By a rough estimate, at least 500 residents attended Tuesday’s open house.

    The parking lot at the armory was overflowing.

  • County Budget Picture Murky

    Levy County’s finances are a mixed bag and commissioners may wish they could read tea leaves to know the county’s future.

    Clerk of Court Danny Shipp and Sheila Rees, head of county finance, gave a report on county revenues and expenditures during Tuesday’s Board of County Commissioners’ meeting that was neither glowing or dismal.

    For the first three months of the fiscal year revenues estimated general fund revenues are up with Rees estimating the county will receive $5,321,042 for the period when the commission had budgeted $5,173,241.

  • Visitors learn how manatees are tracked

    Folks both young and old braved the cold to come out Saturday morning to Manatee Springs State Park, where members of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Sirenia Project held an informative exhibition on the exciting technologies and techniques used in tracking area manatee populations.

    In addition to traditional VHF tracking methods, visitors were also shown new, high-tech digital and GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) tags, which allow researchers to update tagged manatee positions every 15 to 20 minutes and pinpoint their location to within several yards.

  • Bid protest set aside

    The Chiefland City Commission has set aside a bid protest filed by an Illinois company over a pump for the city’s wastewater operation because it came late and the product was too expensive.

    Laurie Copeland, city project and finance coordinator, said the request for bids on the pump said bids could be submitted for diesel or gas-fueled pumps, that the city only intended to spend $47,000 on the pump, and the city reserved the right to waive certain specifications.