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Local News

  • Nuclear plant delayed

    The news came like a thunderclap.

    Progress Energy Florida announced on Friday, May 1 that it will be unable to start construction of the proposed $17 billion Levy County nuclear power plant for 20 months.

    But they company tempered that with an announcement that customers’ monthly power bills won’t as large as expected in 2010.

    County officials are taking a positive look at the twin announcement saying it allows them to better plan for the arrival of the plant and the 3,700 construction and 800 permanent jobs that accompany it.

  • Economy pushes hospital to extension

    Tri-County Hospital CEO Frank Schupp addressed Chiefland Rotary last week with an update on the status of the hospital. He cut to the chase with his opening statement:

    “With the economy the way it is, it’s a tough time to try to raise $54 million.”

    Schupp then emphasized that the project is “still the priority for Enterprise Florida,” the public-private partnership for economic development that helping the project search for funding.

  • Noisy crowd shoots down mine proposal

    After a four-hour public hearing and testimony from more than 20 residents who live in Levy and Marion counties, the Levy County Planning Commission unanimously refused to recommend an application for a mining operation south of Williston.

    An audience of about 150 who gathered to oppose the special exception to allow the mining operation greeted the commission, in its first meeting for several months due to the economic downturn.

    But the crowd, which was noisy at times, cheered the commission’s decision and went away happy.

  • Editors trading places

    This issue of the Chiefland Citizen marks the last by editor Carolyn Risner.

    Former Citizen editor and current Williston Pioneer Sun News editor Jim Clark will be returning to the helm of the Citizen.

    Risner will be taking over the editorship of the Williston newspaper.

    “This transition is a better allocation of our resources and will allow us to continue to provide strong news products in both areas,” said Chiefland general manager Tom Ten Broeck.

  • Florida Writes results are in, Levy fares well

    The 2009 Florida Writes scores are in, and students in Levy County elementary and middle schools continued to improve while high school results were mixed, down overall as is the case throughout the rest of Florida this year.

    Students take the writing portion of the FCAT in fourth-, eighth- and tenth-grades. A score of 3.5 out of 6 is necessary to pass.

  • Controlled burn gets out of control in Cedar Key Scrub

    What began as a prescribed fire Thursday morning in the Cedar Key Scrub State Reserve became a wildfire around noon when unpredictable weather conditions caused fire specialists to lose control, according to Senior Forestry Ranger Jerry Horton.

    The wildfire was approximately 150 acres as of 6 p.m., Horton said.

  • Bronson man wanted in shooting turns self in

     

                      A Bronson man being sought in connection with a shooting behind the Bronson Post Office — an area the Sheriff’s Office has said is know for drug dealing — turned himself in at the Levy County Jail at lunchtime on Thursday.

  • Florida Indian program set for April 23

    The Luther Calloway Public Library of Chiefland will host “Florida Indians from Past to Present” April 23 at 6:30 p.m. at the library.

    Ranger Pam Darty of the Lower Suwannee National Wildlife Refuge will bring pottery, points, and blowguns, as well as footage of ancient ceremonial pottery taken from local grave sites in the 1930s.

  • Suwannee River Poets publish anthology

    Back in the mid 1990s, poet and author, Sandy Fink, rounded up a group of people interested in the reading, writing and preservation of a slowly vanishing art form – poetry. Initially called the Chiefland Poets’ Workshop, the members of the group have changed over the ensuing years, but not their love of the written word. Now known as the Suwannee River Poets, they meet once a month in Chiefland to share their work.

  • Hospital clears hurdle

    There are no Historical or cultural artifacts or endangered species at the proposed site of the Tri-County Hospital project and that has hospital CEO Frank Schupp happy.

    Schupp, who has been working on the project for more than a year was in a brighter mood than ever on Monday when he discussed the progress of the hospital.

    Work has been going on at the site to meet state regulations on locating and saving any artifacts and to certify no threatened or endangered species were at the site.