.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Hastings: Budget woes continue

    The School Board of Levy County’s budget woes continue, with full time enrollment dropping by 118 from its ranks in the 2009-10 school year.

    Speaking before the board Tuesday, Superintendent Bob Hastings announced the decrease, which comes on top of the full time enrollment decrease of 215 from the previous school year.

  • Breaking NewsChiefland's new football coach: Jim O'Neal

    Jim O'Neal, who coached Chiefland High School's football team to a state title game in 1997, is returning to the school, Principal Bill Tovine announced Thursday.

    O'Neal is expected to begin at Chiefland near the end of March. He will also be a physical education teacher.

    O'Neal returns to the Indians from Centennial High School in Port St. Lucie, Fla.

    For more, pick up next week's Chiefland Citizen

     

  • Bronson resident chosen 2010 National Watermelon Queen

    2009 Florida Watermelon Queen Jessica Southard of Bronson has a new title: 2010 National Watermelon Queen last week in Dallas, Texas.

    The 20-year-old was crowned during a Feb. 21 banquet held at the National Watermelon Association annual convention.

    Miss Southard is the daughter of Gary and Kathi Southard of Bronson.She was valedictorian for the Class of 2008 at Bronson High School and was a member of the Future Farmers of America.

    She has also held the title of 2007 Newberry Watermelon Queen.

     

  • Bob Williams chosen Citizen of the Year

    A man described by all who know him as someone who keeps a low-profile in his work, never seeking recognition, was honored with Chiefland's highest accolade on Tuesday night: Citizen of the Year.

    Bob Williams, executive director of the Levy County Housing Authority, was named the recipient of the Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce's award at its annual banquet Tuesday night at the Tommy Usher Community Center.

  • Springs meeting offers solutions

    A University of Florida professor says the creation of artificial wetlands could be the answer to the plight of area springs.

    Dr. Robert Knight told about 32 scientists and concerned citizens attending the Fanning and Manatee Springs Working Group Thursday at Fanning Springs City Hall that artificial wetlands are great at removing pollutants from water.

    “When you have lots of plants in wetlands,” he said, “you get very good removal of nitrogen, especially nitrates.”

  • FWC proposes change to oyster harvesting rule

    In the wake of a potentially devastating summer oyster harvesting ban proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has been postponed for now, a new rule has been developed by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to limit oyster harvesting to morning hours during warm weather months.

  • NFBA wins grant

    The North Florida Broadband Authority, established to bring broadband and high-speed internet connections to rural areas in North Central Florida, will receive  $30, 142, 676 million in federal grant money, according to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

    “This means a whole lot economically,” Pat O' Neal, one of two Levy County representatives from NFBA, said in a Monday morning phone interview.    

  • Better breakfast for seniors a phone call away

    If you are over 60 and money is tight, the Chiefland Senior Center can help out with a free breakfast from 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.

    It’s free and all that is required is to call ahead and let center personnel know you will be having breakfast.

    The center, which is operated by the Suwannee River Economic Council, is looking for seniors to take advantage of the free meals.

    The free breakfast, and lunch too, offer seniors an opportunity to maintain their nutritional levels and to socialze with others in their age group.

  • Black History Month banquet

    Bob Williams, executive director of the Levy County Housing Authority, left, was honored for his community leadership by the Black History Scholarship Committee. The presentation was made during the committee's annual fund-raising banquet on Feb. 20 at Usher Center in Chiefland. Williams was the guest speaker for the event.

    Jones, in introducing Williams, said “he is a man who gives anything you ask him to.

    “He has pitched in where needed,” she said. She said he is first and foremost, a Christian and member of Chiefland First United Methodist Church.

  • Citizens’ group files lawsuit against Progress Energy

    A group of concerned citizens has filed a lawsuit in Sumter County against Progress Energy, claiming laws were passed that violate the state constitution so the utility can collect money to pay for a proposed nuclear power plant.

    Coleman attorney Frank B. Arenas and Alberto E. Lugo-Janer, of Windermere, filed the lawsuit on Monday, Feb. 8, on behalf of Citizens for Ratepayers Rights, a non-profit group.

    Cherie Jacobs, Progress Energy spokesperson, said Thursday the company has not seen the lawsuit and cannot comment until it is reviewed.