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Local News

  • Judge to be “invested” Friday

    A formal investiture for newly appointed Levy County Judge James T. “Tim” Browning will be held Friday at 4:30 p.m. in Courtroom A at the Levy County Courthouse.

    The public is welcome to attend the ceremony and the reception that follows in the cafetorium at Hilltop Alternative School behind the courthouse.

    The ceremony, which dates back to feudal times, is a formal ceremony where the judge takes an oath to uphold the U.S. and Florida constitutions and the laws of the state.

  • Decision tabled for fear of setting precedent

    City commissioners decided by consensus on their Feb. 22  meeting to once again table a decision on whether or not the city should help the county collect emergency management service impact fees.

    The fees, an issue first brought before the commission at its meeting on Feb. 8, were adopted by the county in 2008 and would allow the city to keep 2 percent of the fees it helps the county collect from the issuance of building permits within the city.

  • Planning board appointment hits unplanned snag

    A proposal to reappoint two members of the county planning board without advertising the positions ran into public opposition and a tempest of words at the usually calm Levy County Board of County Commission meeting on Tuesday.

    Shenley Neeley, head of planning for the county, informed the commission that the four-year terms of Thadus Barber from Commission District 3, represented by Marsha Drew of Yankeetown, and Ron Grant from District 5, represented by Danny Stevens of Williston, will expire on April 30.

  • Bronson reviews issues most important to residents

    The Town of Bronson held its first community forum regarding the Comprehensive Plan last week to discuss and make preparations to update the plan.

    “The Department of Community Affairs mandates that the comp plan must be reviewed every seven years,” said Bruce Day with the Withlacoochee Regional Planning Council, hired by the Town to update the plan.

  • Hastings: Budget woes continue

    The School Board of Levy County’s budget woes continue, with full time enrollment dropping by 118 from its ranks in the 2009-10 school year.

    Speaking before the board Tuesday, Superintendent Bob Hastings announced the decrease, which comes on top of the full time enrollment decrease of 215 from the previous school year.

  • Breaking NewsChiefland's new football coach: Jim O'Neal

    Jim O'Neal, who coached Chiefland High School's football team to a state title game in 1997, is returning to the school, Principal Bill Tovine announced Thursday.

    O'Neal is expected to begin at Chiefland near the end of March. He will also be a physical education teacher.

    O'Neal returns to the Indians from Centennial High School in Port St. Lucie, Fla.

    For more, pick up next week's Chiefland Citizen

     

  • Bronson resident chosen 2010 National Watermelon Queen

    2009 Florida Watermelon Queen Jessica Southard of Bronson has a new title: 2010 National Watermelon Queen last week in Dallas, Texas.

    The 20-year-old was crowned during a Feb. 21 banquet held at the National Watermelon Association annual convention.

    Miss Southard is the daughter of Gary and Kathi Southard of Bronson.She was valedictorian for the Class of 2008 at Bronson High School and was a member of the Future Farmers of America.

    She has also held the title of 2007 Newberry Watermelon Queen.

     

  • Bob Williams chosen Citizen of the Year

    A man described by all who know him as someone who keeps a low-profile in his work, never seeking recognition, was honored with Chiefland's highest accolade on Tuesday night: Citizen of the Year.

    Bob Williams, executive director of the Levy County Housing Authority, was named the recipient of the Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce's award at its annual banquet Tuesday night at the Tommy Usher Community Center.

  • Springs meeting offers solutions

    A University of Florida professor says the creation of artificial wetlands could be the answer to the plight of area springs.

    Dr. Robert Knight told about 32 scientists and concerned citizens attending the Fanning and Manatee Springs Working Group Thursday at Fanning Springs City Hall that artificial wetlands are great at removing pollutants from water.

    “When you have lots of plants in wetlands,” he said, “you get very good removal of nitrogen, especially nitrates.”

  • FWC proposes change to oyster harvesting rule

    In the wake of a potentially devastating summer oyster harvesting ban proposed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has been postponed for now, a new rule has been developed by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to limit oyster harvesting to morning hours during warm weather months.