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Local News

  • Chiefland gears up for economic opportunity from state Monday

    Chiefland will be in the spotlight for rural economic development when Jesse Panuccio, executive director of the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, visits the city twice in the coming months.

    Panuccio will be in Chiefland at 3:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 15, for a 45-minute meet and greet with local officials and community leaders. He will return to Chiefland with his staff for a luncheon and tour of the city on Jan. 13 with officials and community leaders.

  • Fanning council concerned over yard sales

    Fanning Springs may be cracking down on yard sales along US Hwy. 19.

    In what started out as a discussion on whether or not to do away with required yard sale permits, some council members expressed opinions saying these types of sales should be restricted along the highway to keep Fanning Springs from becoming one large yard sale.

    At Tuesday night’s city council meeting, Mayor Cheryl Nekola said they should do away with the permitting as many residents do not pay for one and it’s not fair to those who do.

  • Chiefland timber project on well property delayed

    A plan to spray herbicide to clear 30 acres at the city's No. 5 wellfield and replant it in longleaf pines came to a dead halt when a city commissioner who grows trees gave fellow commissioners an education on timing and trees.

  • State OKs Chiefland hospital

    After more than a decade of disappointment, the development of a hospital in Chiefland seems to be inching closer to becoming a reality.
    Friday, the Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration announced that it has granted Ameris Health Systems the certificate of need (CON) necessary to get the $45 million project rolling.
    "It's great news. We're really excited," Ameris senior vice president for business development Frank Schupp said in a phone interview.

  • English-only is preferred

    A non-discrimination policy for those with limited English-speaking skills that is required for public transit systems by the federal government was approved by the Levy County Commission. 

    But the approval came after members of the audience indicated with their applause they would prefer the have only English spoken. 

  • Sheriff's Office praised

    Levy Department of Public Safety Director David Knowles had high praise for County Sheriff Bobby McCallum, his deputies and investigators and the U.S. Marshal's Office in Gainesville. 

    “I want to thank the sheriff's office,” Knowles said first thing on coming to the podium for his turn at the commission meeting. “We had an arson down in Inglis and the sheriff's office apprehended the suspects within 24 hours in conjunction with Marshal's Office.”

  • UF medical students to ride ambulances

    Medical residents will shadow ― and possibly help ― crews on Levy County's ambulances as part of a program to allow them to learn about rural health care.

    The agreement to allow the ride-along was unanimously approved by the Levy County Commission on Tuesday.

    County Public Safety Director David Knowles said the students will be insured by the university for any action they take or encounter on the ride-along.

  • Woman dies in Levy vehicle accident

    A woman died in a one-vehicle accident on State Road 24 at Wekiva Road on Wednesday, Nov. 26, at 11:15 p.m., according to a Florida Highway Patrol press release.

    Olivia Shanice Ricketts, 21, of Lake Park, was driving a 2006 Nissan Sentra southbound on SR 24 when the car veered across the northbound lane and went onto the east shoulder where it turned and then collided with a tree.

  • Transit grants to come back to board

    Levy County Transit Department Director Connie Conley asked the commission for guidance on handling joint participation agreements and grants whether the board would like to have the Chairman sign off on spending the grants and agreements when the money is approved or to have it come back before the full board for approval.

    Conley explained that at times it is two or more weeks between commission meetings and it can delay the time it takes to do things – like purchasing buses.

  • County has only one taker for veterinarian job

    Seven people have applied for the county's new grants coordinator job, but it was the veterinarian's job — which attracted only one applicant that got the most attention from those attending the Levy County Commission.