Local News

  • FEMA sets up assistance stations

    FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, disaster assistance teams arrived in Levy County on Monday and immediately got to work, according to Levy County Emergency Management Director John MacDonald.

    MacDonald, who was at the County Commission meeting for ratification of the county's emergency order from Hurricane Hermine, briefed the board on FEMA's activities.

    He said the officials were scouting places to set up assistance centers that will be fully functional by Thursday.

  • Levy under tropical storm watch

    Wednesday evening update:



    A tropical storm watch has been issued for Levy County and is effective until further notice.  A Tropical Storm watch means that the potential exists for Tropical Storm force winds over the next 48 hours.


    Residents must take steps to protect their property from 30-40 mph winds that could affect items that are not secured.


  • SBA offers disaster assistance to residents ffected by Hurricane Hermine

    WASHINGTON – The U.S. Small Business Administration’s Administrator Maria Contreras-Sweet issued the following statement after the announcement of the Presidential disaster declaration for several counties in Florida affected by Hurricane Hermine that occurred on Aug. 31-Sept. 1.

  • FEMA assistance to start flowing


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    WASHINGTON –The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) announced that federal disaster assistance has been made available to the state of Florida to supplement state, tribal, and local recovery efforts in the area affected by Hurricane Hermine during the period of August 31 to September 11, 2016.

  • Chiefland Interact Club raffling Indians cooler at football game

    The Chiefland Middle High School Interact Club is holding its first fundraiser – a raffle for a customized Indians cooler – and tickets are still available at the school.

    The drawing will be made during Friday’s football game between Chiefland and Trenton.

  • Hospital rezoning due to sinkholes

    The Suwannee Valley Community Hospital is still chugging along and Frank Schupp, spokesman, said construction plans are progressing.

    Schupp told the Chiefland City Commission meeting as the Planning Review Board and again as the commission on Monday that the 20-acre location of the hospital on County Road 320 behind the Walmart Supercenter has the same problem as the giant retailer ― sinkholes.

  • Beef O'Brady's business of the year

    An emotional Mark and Stacy Swain, owners of the Beef O’Brady’s in Chiefland, graciously accepted the 2016 Chiefland Area’s Outstanding Business of the Year Award at the Chamber of Commerce’s Annual Industry Appreciation Banquet. The Chiefland Chamber issued the award every year since 1984.

  • Why FEMA is not here, yet


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    If you suffered damage when Hurricane Hermine swept by on Sept. 1 and are wondering why FEMA has not shown up to stroke a check it is not going to happen.

    FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, doers not do things that way any longer. Since 2002 there has been a federal law setting in place a process for obtaining federal aid.

  • County ups property tax to 2005 level

    The Levy County Commission has given final approval to 9 mills, but not after excoriating the County Clerk Danny Shipp who did not attend Monday’s public hearing, but instead sent an assistant to make an 11th hour request to cover pay raises for non-court employees and an expected employee insurance premium hike.

    And it did not stop with the public hearing as the commissioners turned up the heat in their regular meeting asking for responses to their requests for information on a new internet provider agreement. And mocking his absence through most of the meeting.

  • 'It looked like a war zone'

    By Michael Bates

    Tuesday in the middle of his living room at his Yankeetown home — what’s left of it, that is.

    Twenty-seven inches of water swept through Ralph Dixon’s home in Hurricane Hermine, destroying furniture, lamps, kitchen utensils and other items that make up a life.

    It’s hot in the living room. The air condition and power are out. Dixon, 84, sweated while he packed up what was salvageable. What can be saved will be put inside a portable storage unit he had delivered and placed in his driveway.