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Local News

  • Holiday Food Boxes

    One Way Church of Chiefland is creating Holiday Food Boxes for needy families. Holiday Food donation boxes located at The Gathering Table, 116 N. Main St.; The Print Shop, 224 N. Main St.; and Dollar General, 1310 N. Young Blvd. In Trenton, boxes are located at Dollar General, 702 N. Main St.; and Ayers Health and Rehabilitation Center, 606 N. Seventh St. Place nonperishable food items at any one of these locations and be a part of blessing a needy family this holiday.

  • Railroads and Riverboats are on display at Levy County libraries

    An excursion into the Golden Age of Transportation awaits patrons of the Levy County Public Libraries.

    For the next six months, each of the local libraries will have a display of photographs of the railroads and riverboats that plied the waters of the Suwannee River and surrounding waters.

    Steam navigation started on the Suwannee during the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-1842) when the vessels were utilized to carry U.S. soldiers to the interior of Florida and bring the captured Seminoles Indians out to the coast for transport west. Commercial navigation ended when the City of Hawkinsville was abandoned by her last Captain, Mr. Currie, on May 19, 1922.

    Today the vessel rests in shallow water on the west bank of the Suwannee River above Old Town.

    Another well known vessel of Suwannee River fame was the Madison, owned and operated by Capt. James Tucker. Not only did the vessel gain recognition providing the residents of the Suwannee River with much needed supplies, but also served under the Confederacy during the Civil War transporting troops and food stuffs and protecting the river.

  • Toys for Tots registration dates in Tri-County area

    The U.S. Marine Corps Reserves begins registration for Toys For Tots Registration in Levy County will be open to all three counties, however, to ease transportation barriers and to ensure sufficient volunteer assistance on-hand for each site, please take advantage of registration dates in your home county, when possible.

    Dixie County: Friday, Oct. 20, 9 a.m.12 p.m. Dixie County Public Library, 16328 US-19, Cross City, FL 32628

    Gilchrist County: Friday, Oct. 27, 9 a.m.12 p.m. Gilchrist County Public Library, 105 NE 11th Ave, Trenton, FL 32693

    Levy County: Mon-Thurs, Oct. 15, from 9 a.m.12 p.m., Tri-County Community Resources, 15 North Main St in Chiefland, FL 32626

    Registration requirements:

    Only children 12 years of age or younger are qualified.

    Parent or Legal Guardian’s current Government Issued Photo ID.

    Child’s Birth Certificate or Court Ordered Custody Records

    Child’s Social Security Card

    Proof of Residence (2 of 4, in registering guardian’s name)

    Driver’s License or Photo ID (with star indicating verified residence)

  • Fowlers Bluff Fire Board
  • Songs of Christmas for the Williston Christmas parade

    Everyone who celebrates Christmas has a favorite song from the season.

    Maybe it’s O Holy Night or Winter Wonderland or Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer.

    This year the Williston Area Chamber of Commerce is giving those who participate in its parade a chance to show off their imaginations and creativity.

    This year’s parade kicks off at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 2 and is themed, “The Songs of Christmas.”

    Floats, walkers, musicians and all participants are encouraged to pick a theme and then have a lot of fun customizing your parade entry to your favorite Christmas song.

    The Chamber will award three trophies during the Light Up Williston festivities at the pavilion following the parade. Honors will be bestowed for Most Original, Best Depiction of Theme and Best in Show.

    Entrants will need to register at the Chamber to be in the parade beginning Oct. 9.

    For more information, call 352-528-5552 or visit www.willistonfl.com.

  • NCBS opens in Cedar Key

    By REBECCA GALLAGHER
    Citizen Correspondent

    The long-awaited opening of the new Nature Coast Biological Station has arrived. Residents of Cedar Key and surrounding areas turned out en masse to get a view of the new building.

    Dr. Michael Allen, director of the NCBS, said that the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences has been active in Cedar Key with research, teaching and extension programs along the nature coast in for about 30 years and yet never had an office.

    “This will be our home,” he said. “This building will provide a research facility and offices for scientists, graduate students and technicians.”

  • City adopts final millage rate, budget

    Chiefland City Commissioners narrowly approved the new millage rate for Fiscal Year 2017-18 during the final budget meeting Monday.

    Resolution 17-09 adopts a final millage rate of 6.9850 is 17.46 percent greater than the rolled-back rate of 5.9468 and for that reason, Commissioners Teresa Barron and Rollin Hudson voted against the motion offered by Commission Donald Lawrence and seconded by Commissioner Chris Jones. Mayor Betty Walker joined Lawrence and Jones in voting for approval. The new rate is projected to raise $878,608 in taxable revenue.

    With that done, commissioners voted by the same margin to approve Resolution 17-10 to set the budget at $5,023,904 in projected revenues and expenses.

  • Fanning Springs prohibits internet cafe, marijuana

    By Kate Sheridan, Citizen Correspondent

    The Fanning Springs City Council voted to place a 365-day moratorium on an internet cafe and medical marijuana.

    In explaining the details found and reasons behind the decision to not approve any permits or licenses for the internet café, City Attorney Michael O’Steen said that at this point, internet cafes are quite simply illegal. There are several loopholes and rule bending done to allow the businesses to function, but bottom line said O’Steen, is that if you go into one of these locations, hand over your money, there is a chance you will walk out and lose that money. It is still considered gambling and that is illegal. At this stage, there are just too many negatives to clearly state that these businesses should even be open and running at all. Rather than be the pioneers, Fanning Springs opted for the moratorium.

    Also voted and approved was to adopt a 365-day moratorium to not permit for a facility for the medical marijuana. The action does not infringe on persons to use their prescriptions. It only prevents a facility from opening within Fanning Springs.

  • Lions Club announces expanded vision services

    Cedar Key Lions Club today announced an expanded coverage area for Lions Club Vision Services. Residents of Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie counties are now eligible to receive free vision services from the Lions.

    Club President Dale Register remarked, “Ninety years ago, Helen Keller challenged the Lions Club to take up the cause of the blind. Lions in Cedar Key have answered that challenge since 1968. As we approach our Club’s 50th Anniversary, I’m honored to announce an expanded service area. It’s a privilege for the Cedar Key Lions Club to provide eye exams, eyeglasses, glaucoma treatment and cataract surgery to individuals demonstrating financial need in Levy, Gilchrist and Dixie counties. This expanded service area triples our ability help those in need. Our club proudly upholds the Lions motto: We Serve.”

    Cedar Key Lions have streamlined the application process to deliver benefits faster.  Find the the Lions Vision Service Program application online at www.cedarkeylionsclub.com

  • Chiefland Rotary Club holds annual dove hunt

    Two Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission officers were the guest speakers at the Nov. 29 meeting of the Chiefland Rotary Club.

    Rotarian Stoney Smith introduced officers Morgan Willis and Paul Schulz. Since hunting and fishing regulations are constantly changing due to conservation and environmental concerns, the officers presented updated information that will help members stay safe and avoid law enforcement issues. 

    Schulz went covered deer management areas and antler size regulations, which changed three years ago. With the dove shoot Dec. 2 and the opening of dove season on Dec. 12, he laid out the regulations: hunting license is needed, shotgun must be plugged and there is a 15 dove limit per hunter per day. A hunter may be in possession of 45 doves — but each hunter may only personally have 15. The example given was that if one or two hunters gave their birds to a third hunter to take home, each hunter must provide their name, address and phone number for those 15 doves. The hunter in possession must be able to prove to the officer those were not all his kill.