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Local News

  • 14th Annual Christmas and Winter Festival in Chiefland

    The 14th Annual Christmas and Winter Festival in Chiefland starts at 10 a.m., Saturday, Dec. 9, and continues through the day until 8 p.m. in the field on U.S. Highway 19 across from Train Depot Park at 23 SE Second Ave.

    Enjoy arts and crafts, food, children’s attractions, entertainment, free photo with Santa, Mrs. Claus and elves, pony rides and games.

    The Lighted Christmas Parade rolls down Main Street at 6 p.m. from Chiefland High School, then south on Highway 19 to SE Third Avenue. Parade viewing is from sidewalks alongside US 19 on the parade route. 

  • Holiday Food Boxes

    One Way Church of Chiefland is creating Holiday Food Boxes for needy families. Holiday Food donation boxes located at The Gathering Table, 116 N. Main St.; The Print Shop, 224 N. Main St.; and Dollar General, 1310 N. Young Blvd. In Trenton, boxes are located at Dollar General, 702 N. Main St.; and Ayers Health and Rehabilitation Center, 606 N. Seventh St. Place nonperishable food items at any one of these locations and be a part of blessing a needy family this holiday.

  • Railroads and Riverboats are on display at Levy County libraries

    An excursion into the Golden Age of Transportation awaits patrons of the Levy County Public Libraries.

    For the next six months, each of the local libraries will have a display of photographs of the railroads and riverboats that plied the waters of the Suwannee River and surrounding waters.

    Steam navigation started on the Suwannee during the Second Seminole Indian War (1835-1842) when the vessels were utilized to carry U.S. soldiers to the interior of Florida and bring the captured Seminoles Indians out to the coast for transport west. Commercial navigation ended when the City of Hawkinsville was abandoned by her last Captain, Mr. Currie, on May 19, 1922.

    Today the vessel rests in shallow water on the west bank of the Suwannee River above Old Town.

    Another well known vessel of Suwannee River fame was the Madison, owned and operated by Capt. James Tucker. Not only did the vessel gain recognition providing the residents of the Suwannee River with much needed supplies, but also served under the Confederacy during the Civil War transporting troops and food stuffs and protecting the river.

  • Toys for Tots registration dates in Tri-County area

    The U.S. Marine Corps Reserves begins registration for Toys For Tots Registration in Levy County will be open to all three counties, however, to ease transportation barriers and to ensure sufficient volunteer assistance on-hand for each site, please take advantage of registration dates in your home county, when possible.

    Dixie County: Friday, Oct. 20, 9 a.m.12 p.m. Dixie County Public Library, 16328 US-19, Cross City, FL 32628

    Gilchrist County: Friday, Oct. 27, 9 a.m.12 p.m. Gilchrist County Public Library, 105 NE 11th Ave, Trenton, FL 32693

    Levy County: Mon-Thurs, Oct. 15, from 9 a.m.12 p.m., Tri-County Community Resources, 15 North Main St in Chiefland, FL 32626

    Registration requirements:

    Only children 12 years of age or younger are qualified.

    Parent or Legal Guardian’s current Government Issued Photo ID.

    Child’s Birth Certificate or Court Ordered Custody Records

    Child’s Social Security Card

    Proof of Residence (2 of 4, in registering guardian’s name)

    Driver’s License or Photo ID (with star indicating verified residence)

  • Fowlers Bluff Fire Board
  • Songs of Christmas for the Williston Christmas parade

    Everyone who celebrates Christmas has a favorite song from the season.

    Maybe it’s O Holy Night or Winter Wonderland or Grandma Got Run Over By a Reindeer.

    This year the Williston Area Chamber of Commerce is giving those who participate in its parade a chance to show off their imaginations and creativity.

    This year’s parade kicks off at 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 2 and is themed, “The Songs of Christmas.”

    Floats, walkers, musicians and all participants are encouraged to pick a theme and then have a lot of fun customizing your parade entry to your favorite Christmas song.

    The Chamber will award three trophies during the Light Up Williston festivities at the pavilion following the parade. Honors will be bestowed for Most Original, Best Depiction of Theme and Best in Show.

    Entrants will need to register at the Chamber to be in the parade beginning Oct. 9.

    For more information, call 352-528-5552 or visit www.willistonfl.com.

  • NCBS opens in Cedar Key

    By REBECCA GALLAGHER
    Citizen Correspondent

    The long-awaited opening of the new Nature Coast Biological Station has arrived. Residents of Cedar Key and surrounding areas turned out en masse to get a view of the new building.

    Dr. Michael Allen, director of the NCBS, said that the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences has been active in Cedar Key with research, teaching and extension programs along the nature coast in for about 30 years and yet never had an office.

    “This will be our home,” he said. “This building will provide a research facility and offices for scientists, graduate students and technicians.”

  • City adopts final millage rate, budget

    Chiefland City Commissioners narrowly approved the new millage rate for Fiscal Year 2017-18 during the final budget meeting Monday.

    Resolution 17-09 adopts a final millage rate of 6.9850 is 17.46 percent greater than the rolled-back rate of 5.9468 and for that reason, Commissioners Teresa Barron and Rollin Hudson voted against the motion offered by Commission Donald Lawrence and seconded by Commissioner Chris Jones. Mayor Betty Walker joined Lawrence and Jones in voting for approval. The new rate is projected to raise $878,608 in taxable revenue.

    With that done, commissioners voted by the same margin to approve Resolution 17-10 to set the budget at $5,023,904 in projected revenues and expenses.

  • The math of quilting

    The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday, Oct. 5, at the Levy County Quilt Museum. Just as we were beginning to start on our projects, the electricity went off. We were hoping that meant the electricity was being added to the new RV Park on CR 120 behind Walmart. To us, RVers means quilters, which means new friends.

    Janie brought in several items like pencils and a protractor that we may need when we start working on templates for the Mohawk trail. Betcha didn’t know protractors were used in quilting. Quilting involves a lot of math especially if you’re creating your design or quilting pattern.

    Derick and the guys from Lancaster were out this week. They hadn’t been out for some time so they were busy with the yard and straighten up the porch. It was all Ailien and I could do to move the picnic tables to get ready for Hurricane Irma so we waited for the guys to return to get the porch back in order. There was no way we could lift the tables, it was all we could do to push/pull the tables where we wanted them to go. Thanks guys getting the yard and porch looking so nice.

  • Channel, Drew lecture on climate change

    Retired Dr. James E. T. Channel, U.F. Department of Geological Sciences and UF/IFAS Levy County Extension Agent Anthony Drew gave a  climate change presentation to 47 people Sept. 22 at the Levy Levy County Agricultural Extension Service office in Bronson.

    Channel presented the facts of climate change that are supported by documented geological evidence. The potential impact on agriculture and horticulture, in general, was discussed.

    Levy County Extension Agent Anthony Drew asked the audience how many have planted dogwood trees recently and how were those trees doing?

    The overwhelming response seemed to be that the trees are not doing well.

    According to Drew, the warmer temperatures in the atmosphere are to blame. It seems the trees are falling victim to global warming.

    Drew gave examples of what he called “anomalies” being witnessed in the plant kingdom. He then went on to introduce Dr. James E. Channell, his friend of several years.

    They met at a dinner party, and while the wives discussed tile colors the men started talking about their careers.