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Education

  • Crossing guard watches over kiddies and kitties

     Crossing guard Mary Anne Griner watches over kiddies and kitties to ensure their safety. She helps the children across the street and sometimes she takes the cats home.
    Griner said she walked a couple of students across the street a little after she arrived on post at North Young and Fourth Avenue at about 7:15 in the morning where she guards the crosswalks for two hours in the morning and again in the afternoon when school lets out.

    A little gray kitten tried to cross the street but Griner picked it up to keep it from getting ran over. She pet it before putting it back down on the ground. It rubbed against her foot and walked between her feet.

    She named the little gray cat, “Smokey.” She said she would take it to the police station to see if they wanted it. If not, she said she would probably take it home. Friday morning, when asked what happened to the kitten, she said she took it home. 

  • Three students, three paths forward

     Three students with widely varying backgrounds, circumstances and educational goals  were singled out Aug. 11 for their commitment to education during the ribbon-cutting ceremony at the Jack Wilkinson Levy Campus.
    Randi Williams, 17, graduated from Chiefland High School in May. Brittany Holder, 24, a single mother of two, earned a GED in 2013 at the old Levy Center and Dilan Jones, 19, graduated from Chiefland High School in 2016, finishing third in his class.

    Williams wants to earn an associate degree in Humanities before she starts traveling and volunteering in lesser developed countries in South America that need help. 

  • CF cuts ribbon to future

     The ribbon was cut to the Jack Wilkinson Levy Campus Aug. 11 in the 60th year of the College of Central Florida as a higher education provider in Marion, Citrus and Levy counties. CF President Dr. James Henningsen said in his opening remarks that he couldn’t think of a better place to celebrate than in Levy County. 

    “Our Jack Wilkinson Levy Campus will be the first permanent higher education facility in the entire county,” he said in his opening remarks. “The Jack Wilkinson Levy Campus started 13 years ago as a vision of the board of trustees, community members and then President Dr. Charles Dassance.”

  • School millage rate falls as property values rise

    The rise in total property value in Levy County has led to a drop in the tentative millage rate just passed by the School Board of Levy County.

    The SBLC on Monday voted to adopt the tentative millage at the rollback rate, which is the rate required to collect roughly the same amount of revenue as the previous fiscal year.

  • Driven to distraction

    It’s difficult enough coping with the challenges of being a new driver on the road.

    When you add the kind of distractions and impairments teen drivers might be susceptible to, the effects can be insurmountable.

    The Teen Driver Improvement Course, put on annually for 11 years by the Levy County Sheriff’s Office, aims to educate prospective and current young drivers on the dangers of texting while driving and driving under the influence of alcohol.

  • CES, two more Levy schools recognized for volunteerism

    Three Levy County elementary schools have been recognized for their excellence in volunteerism.

    At the School Board of Levy County meeting last Tuesday, Chiefland Elementary School Principal Lacy Redd, Yankeetown School principal Denee Hurst and Joyce Bullock Elementary School assistant principal Hillary Cribbs accepted Florida Golden School Award certificates on behalf of their schools for their high levels of volunteer contributions and volunteer training.

    It was the first year any Levy schools received the award.

  • Webber returns to CMHS

    Monday was Dennis Webber’s first day in the office in his new job as principal of Chiefland Middle High School, but it wasn’t exactly a new setting for the longtime Chiefland educator.

    Webber is coming from his position as principal of the Levy Learning Academy, the county’s alternative school center in Bronson, but previously spent time as a teacher, coach, dean of students and eventually assistant principal at Chiefland Middle and Chiefland High School.

    He’s been in education for nearly 30 years.

  • Levy students can dual enroll in UF courses

    The School Board of Levy County has made the County the first rural county to partner with the University of Florida for its dual enrollment program.

    Dual enrollment courses allow high school juniors and seniors to take free college courses that offer credits toward a college degree while also satisfying high school credit requirements in the course subject area.

    The applicants for the UF dual enrollment courses must maintain a 3.5 unweighted GPA. They must also provide a test score – SAT, PSAT or ACT – that meets requirements.

  • Free PreK extended to full day in Levy

    The School Board of Levy County has agreed to a major change to the Prekindergarten program, significantly expanding its free service.

    Four- and 5-year-olds have already been eligible for free prekindergarten instruction for the first three hours of the school day under Florida’s Voluntary Prekindergarten Education Program (VPK).

    Starting next school year, the Board has now made prekindergarten free for the entire day, beyond the three hours of VPK instruction. That includes free transportation to and from the care center as well as breakfast and lunch.

  • Four Lady Indians sign scholarships